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New here - first post. I have a very slow DSL connection; but just did a gruelingly slow search for info. Just got this rust bucket 1998 Frontier 4X4 XE King Cab. Found info on removing bed - Thanks everyone! 6 bolts, 3 screws on fuel inlet, etc.

Questions:
Guesstimate on how much weight is added when building a wooden flat bed? I want the extra space to haul firewood, gravel, cases of beer, etc. Does doing this really affect hauling capacity?

Configuration of wooden platform...? Could not find pics nor ideas on best / lightest plans.

Thanks!

J.D.
 

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New here - first post. I have a very slow DSL connection; but just did a gruelingly slow search for info. Just got this rust bucket 1998 Frontier 4X4 XE King Cab. Found info on removing bed - Thanks everyone! 6 bolts, 3 screws on fuel inlet, etc.

Questions:
Guesstimate on how much weight is added when building a wooden flat bed? I want the extra space to haul firewood, gravel, cases of beer, etc. Does doing this really affect hauling capacity?

Configuration of wooden platform...? Could not find pics nor ideas on best / lightest plans.

Thanks!

J.D.
you'd add ALOT of weight. It WILL affect your payload capacity negatively. Dealer should be able to tell you what teh freight weight of the stock bed is. I know when I did this with my old F-100 as a kid it added 150lbs over what it was with teh steel bed. It was a highway hauler do the increased weight just planted the rear a bit better, and I was a stupid kid and didn't know any better (internet wasn't a thing yet)
 

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I thought about this when I re-did the bed in my '66 Chevy C10 Looooongbed. I ended up going with White Oak for strength and the White oak is more pleasing to the eye. It also depends on the type of wood you use. If you use White or less expensive Red Oak you had better upgrade the suspension due to the weight. If you use a more soft wood like Pine or Fir... it's probably 1/3 of the weight. The real clincher is what you plan to load in the back. Pine and Fir are going to dent like a piece of cardboard while the oak is like... oak. Hope this helps!
 

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I thought about this when I re-did the bed in my '66 Chevy C10 Looooongbed. I ended up going with White Oak for strength and the White oak is more pleasing to the eye. It also depends on the type of wood you use. If you use White or less expensive Red Oak you had better upgrade the suspension due to the weight. If you use a more soft wood like Pine or Fir... it's probably 1/3 of the weight. The real clincher is what you plan to load in the back. Pine and Fir are going to dent like a piece of cardboard while the oak is like... oak. Hope this helps!
We use 3" thick fir deck boards on oil field supply vessel cargo decks. While it is softer than most oak species and other hardwoods, it doesn't dent like cardboard. In fact, many of those decks last 20 years. And it's about 3/4 the density of red or white oak, not 1/3.
 

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We use 3" thick fir deck boards on oil field supply vessel cargo decks. While it is softer than most oak species and other hardwoods, it doesn't dent like cardboard. In fact, many of those decks last 20 years. And it's about 3/4 the density of red or white oak, not 1/3.
I stand corrected... well, I'm sitting... but you get the point::grin::
 
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