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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
As the title asks will adding an ARB Air locker to the front diff strengthen it. I have read where the weak front Diff can be an issue?

My Max tire size will likely not be more than a 33 skinny tire... 2014 Frontier for more background to be used for overlanding.

Thanks in advance for replies.

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The weak point of the r180 is the spider gears.That is what fails. If the ARB eliminates them , I think they do but am not sure it will make the r180 less prone to failure. I know the Lokka locker eliminates them.
 

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The most common failure of the stock front axle are the 2 spider gears. A tooth will break off and when if falls between the ring and pinion it spreads then and splits the case.

The ARB will make front diff stronger. It uses 4 spider gears so the forces are distributed on more gears/teeth. The ARB can pretty much take double the force. which means it is no longer the weakest link. Typically after the ARB is installed the next weakest link is the CV on the axle shaft itself. Which is a way easier and cheaper fix then doing a front diff. I'm not sure if anyone has found the next weak point after that.

In short, the ARB is a good choice to make the front diff good and strong. Should be all you will ever need.
 

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Curious as to what actually fails on the CV.
 

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When I broke my axles, the driver's side CV stayed fine and it twisted the axle off right where it goes into the diff. On the passenger side it broke inside the boot closest to the diff. Both are still stuck in the diff as I have not drilled and tapped the driver's side and pry bars are not taking the one out of the other side so I expect it is likely twisted and the mounting surfaces in the diff are now likely screwed. It still turns fine so the locker kept it from blowing up. It is the only reason I bought the M205 was to move the axle connections outside of the diff and just be bolted on in hopes that the next time I break one it breaks where I can change it on a trail and keep going instead of just making it so I can limp home.
 

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Don't people crack the aluminum case too? That's a weak link.

Clint
 

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The case cracks when the spider gears make the gears separate, I do not remember hearing of a case break without the gears exploding first.
 

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So it was the end of the CV and not the actual axles.
 

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One was the axle shaft and one was the inner cv.
 

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Ok, thanks for the info. I don't think I will have a problem with my axles( made from 300m,modified 4340 chrome moly). Hopefully the stock CV's will hold up for what I do.
 

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So it was the end of the CV and not the actual axles.
I've grenaded both but I'm a bit harder on my equipment than most. The biggest reason the CV joints themselves fail is excessive angle. Ours is a pretty poor design. It doesn't take much angle for the lower section of the bearing cage (or upper for the inner joint/cup) to hang out of the cup. When that happens (at or near max droop or near full lock steering) the cage is usually the first thing to go when too much torque or shock load is applied.
At ride height it's usually the axle shaft itself that goes, though it takes a bit more torque application (lose traction then suddenly gain it back with wheels spinning).

But to answer the original question, yes, the ARB locker significantly improves the strength of the stock diff for the reasons mentioned above. The stock sand cast spiders are prone to breakage with relatively little shock load.
 

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Not sure why more people don't strap their suspension. Seems like it would prevent extreme CV angles. Same with bumps.
Maybe to get the lift they want people are pushing the CV angle already.
 

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I wouldn't recommend a 33" tire on the
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Even with the modifications mentioned?
Explain why not?
 

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The R180 diff is super small. We beat this discussion to death over on the AC forums back in the day. Even a 33" tire on a R200A front diff is already being pushed to its limit, and that's on a front diff.

As the same reason why we do not recommend anything larger than a 33" tire on a C200K rear diff.


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So if you go to 33's what fails in the differential? Just curious.
 

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Ring and pinion.

I was going through my old junk when I did ring and pinion installs to show size difference between the R200a, H233b, Dana44, Toyota front. I can't find my R200a pinion.

I ended up throwing all of the ring gears away.


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I'm sure this is all for people who off-road their trucks. If you don't off-road, then it doesn't matter what tire size you use.


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Do you think the problem is the difference in weight or the extra strain on the diff with the taller tire?
I run 265/75/r16 Toyo mt's. They are heavy.
The 255/85/ r16 are a little over an inch taller but I am guessing the weight is close to the same.
Yes, I off- road.
 

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Good question!!!!!!!!

Not sure if it's the weight of the tire and/or taller diameter.

Possibly both contributes to the rolling mass. I'm sure terrain would greatly affect this as well as if a traction aid is installed too. Now to think of it, I bet driving style has some affect.


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