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I keep the following in my truck. The recovery gear bag and the air compressor are usually only loaded when I'm planning to off road or go on a long trip. The rest is always in there.

- Leatherman
- small flash light
- head lamp
- window breaker/seat belt cutter
- rain poncho
- CB radio
- role of toilet paper
- cargo straps

- recovery gear bag with the following:
--- recovery strap
--- small shovel
--- 4 D-ring shackles
--- Smittybilt recovery attachment for my hitch receiver

- Tool bag with the following:
--- 1/4 and 3/8 standard and metric socket sets
--- medium adjustable wrench
--- screw driver with multiple attachments
--- metric and standard allen key sets
--- OBD-II code reader
--- Viair tire pressure gauge
--- Smittybilt deflators
--- leather work gloves
--- tire plug set
--- regular/needle nose vise grips
--- 5 lb mini sledge
--- valve stem remover
--- Gerber spring assist knife
--- extra valve stems, zip ties, duct tape, hose clamps, fuses...

- jumper cables
- Viair 300p compressor
- first aid kit semi-mirrored off an IFAK
- write in the rain note pad and pencil
- hand sanitizer, small hand lotion, sunscreen, ibuprofen
 

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So I'll bite, why all the mentions of SAE sockets? Aren't these trucks basically full-metric?

When I was strongly considering buying and upfitting my folks '99 Tracker (basically rebadged Suzuki Vitara), when I looked at the various manufacturers I essentially ruled-out any that used SAE hardware, simply because it seemed dumb to add a need for SAE tools to what started out as an all-metric truck.
 

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So I'll bite, why all the mentions of SAE sockets? Aren't these trucks basically full-metric?

When I was strongly considering buying and upfitting my folks '99 Tracker (basically rebadged Suzuki Vitara), when I looked at the various manufacturers I essentially ruled-out any that used SAE hardware, simply because it seemed dumb to add a need for SAE tools to what started out as an all-metric truck.
What if the rig you're trying to fix enough to get off the trail isn't "all-metric"? Cheap insurance to carry both, even if you never use the SAE on your own vehicle.
 

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What if the rig you're trying to fix enough to get off the trail isn't "all-metric"? Cheap insurance to carry both, even if you never use the SAE on your own vehicle.
Seems if the tools are to fix someone else's rig rather than one's own, that it's carrying things further than "essential", more like an enhanced kit than the bare-bones essential kit. When I look at our 2015 Jeep Renegade Trailhawk I have to equip the toolkit with Torx and Etorx plus the usual complement of metric 6pt if I want to be able to deal with all of the suspension components that could suffer on an adventure. As that particular vehicle is very light there's definitely an upper-limit as to what I will carry simply because I cannot carry everything.

For these Frontiers especially crew cabs like mine, the storage under the seats and behind the back seat is the limiting factor for the essential tools and supplies, so it's limited to things that will first and foremost help this truck should it have a problem. Doesn't mean I'm going to have an F-u-Ive-got-mine attitude if I find someone that needs some assistance, but if everyone brings their own minimal complement of tools adequate for their vehicle then it shouldn't be a big deal. After all, I don't see anyone advocating carrying a set of British Whitworth tools to work on old Landrovers they might encounter on the trail. It's already questionable enough if I will ever actually need my tools for my own truck, I'm not going to speculate further than that.
 

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If you basically have a stock truck, I can see not needing SAE tools.
Many here have modified trucks that use SAE fasteners.
Fox, King, Sway a Way, shocks, etc use SAE fasteners.
Also for those of us that Fab, it is much easier to design and construct things in Imperial measurements rather than metric.
Example, try and find chromemoly tubing in metric that meets requirements in different race organizations.
I easily have 20 grand in machinist equipment and tools.
None of it is in Metric.
Lots of reason.
My fasteners. Very little need for mertric although I do have a supply of replacements nuts and bolts in metric.
 

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Does anybody know where I can find a 101.6 centimeter light bar?
 

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So I'll bite, why all the mentions of SAE sockets? Aren't these trucks basically full-metric?

When I was strongly considering buying and upfitting my folks '99 Tracker (basically rebadged Suzuki Vitara), when I looked at the various manufacturers I essentially ruled-out any that used SAE hardware, simply because it seemed dumb to add a need for SAE tools to what started out as an all-metric truck.
Well, maybe if you are against SAE tools, you should exchange your 1/2”,3/8”,1/4” ratchets for metric ones.
For the life of me I can’t find a metric impact either.
 

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Well, maybe if you are against SAE tools, you should exchange your 1/2”,3/8”,1/4” ratchets for metric ones.
For the life of me I can’t find a metric impact either.
You guys know that isn't the point. The point is that if the truck is all-metric in its fasteners then there's no reason to carry SAE tools. It doesn't matter that the sheet metal gauge of the aftermarket bumper is 3/16", the fasteners that hold that bumper to the frame are metric. It doesn't matter if the lightbar across the top of the truck is 60" or 150cm, it matters if it uses a 10mm fastener at each end or a 7/16" fastener at each end.

My biggest complaint about metric fasteners most of the time, that since metric graduations between sizes are physically smaller it requires more tools to cover a given physical span of sizes, is actually something of an advantage for substituting metric fasteners in place of SAE fasteners. There's a wider selection to choose from and inevitably there's one just below the SAE size or else a little above such that it should not be a problem to use metric fasteners.

When I had been looking at upfitting that Tracker, basically Calmini worked in SAE while OME worked in metric. Had I done the truck up like I'd intended I would have gone with OME most likely.

Obviously everyone is entitled to their own opinion, but I still think it's silly to use SAE fasteners on a metric truck, just like I think it's silly to use metric fasteners on a vehicle that is all SAE. I find cars like my '95 Impala to be very silly in that regard because they left the factory with a mostly-but-not-wholly metric engine and a mostly-but-not-wholly SAE frame, with a body that is about half and half.
 

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Look I respect your opinion. But obviously you do no fabrication.
If you go to my build thread , I used hundreds of fasteners on my truck.
I use tons of AN fittings on my fuel system. They don’t use metric wrenches. The wrenches are SAE although in aluminum.
Your truck is destined to remain stock if you absolutley are unwilling to purchase components that use SAE equipment.
Good luck with that.
 

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By the way,owner’s of m226 differentials might want to carry a wrench(SAE) for the differential cover. 5/16 -18 just in case you need to remove the cover.
 

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[QUOTE It doesn't matter if the lightbar across the top of the truck is 60" or 150cm, it matters if it uses a 10mm fastener at each end or a 7/16" fastener at each end.

When I had been looking at upfitting that Tracker, basically Calmini worked in SAE while OME worked in metric. Had I done the truck up like I'd intended I would have gone with OME most likely.
[/QUOTE]

So you base the quality of a component on the basis of the fasteners used?
Now that is silly to me.
I used 1/4-20 bolts when I fabbed my Light bar mounts.
 

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I keep the following in my truck. The recovery gear bag and the air compressor are usually only loaded when I'm planning to off road or go on a long trip. The rest is always in there.

- Leatherman
- small flash light
- head lamp
- window breaker/seat belt cutter
- rain poncho
- CB radio
- role of toilet paper
- cargo straps

- recovery gear bag with the following:
--- recovery strap
--- small shovel
--- 4 D-ring shackles
--- Smittybilt recovery attachment for my hitch receiver

- Tool bag with the following:
--- 1/4 and 3/8 standard and metric socket sets
--- medium adjustable wrench
--- screw driver with multiple attachments
--- metric and standard allen key sets
--- OBD-II code reader
--- Viair tire pressure gauge
--- Smittybilt deflators
--- leather work gloves
--- tire plug set
--- regular/needle nose vise grips
--- 5 lb mini sledge
--- valve stem remover
--- Gerber spring assist knife
--- extra valve stems, zip ties, duct tape, hose clamps, fuses...

- jumper cables
- Viair 300p compressor
- first aid kit semi-mirrored off an IFAK
- write in the rain note pad and pencil
- hand sanitizer, small hand lotion, sunscreen, ibuprofen
This is a great list. I would add ( if applicable ):
One or two 5 Gallon Jerry Cans ( I have two, haven't needed them yet )
- An axe ( I have, & haven't needed it yet )
- A hatchet ( I have, & haven't needed it yet )
- Wood saw and metal cutting hacksaw ( or just two blades, one saw frame, & exchange them out )( I have, & haven't needed it yet )
- Jack stands ( if you have space ) & solid pads to go underneath, for soft surfaces ( I carry one, & haven't needed it yet )
- Waterproof matches
- A small hand-held mirror
- Possibly a steel and magnesium striker hand-held fire-starter kit ( I have, & haven't needed it yet )
- Bigger expense but a HAM radio after passing your Technician Grade FCC HAM license examination. I'm working on mine now. Many places with absolutely ZERO cell phone reception.
- Lastly, probably not in the toolbox, but extra water, at least a minimum of 1 gallon per person per day, if you are traveling in more remote areas. You can do for days w/o food and maybe just get a little shaky or gut-rumbled but run outta potable water and you could have semi-major issues.
 

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Flashlight, the more lumens the better. Ibuprofen and chocolate! Helmet for places that require one and the good ‘ole orange flag on a post. State Park requirement in some states, or maybe all of them. Blanket for the unexpected overnight camp out. Zip ties, they rock. Come along, or A winch if you’re lucky enough to have one mounted. Small shovel and a board, good old fashion way to get yourself out.
 

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Bunches of good suggestions, and I may have missed it, but a spare key. Preferably not carried inside (for obvious reasons) the cab.

I was about 7 or 8 miles off Hwy 101 back on a bunch of Forest Service roads & stopped to take a short hike with my dog. Somehow, my keys jumped out o' my pocket. I 'bout had a heart attack when I got back to the truck & my pocket was empty. An hour later, and on my fourth time backtracking, I finally found 'em just barely peeking out from under a fern.
 
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