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Discussion Starter #1
After installing a set of Cardone calipers less than a year ago, one was bad out of the box, and now I have one leaking. I wouldn't mind paying a decent price to not have to mess with it again. New would be nice. I guess I could get Nissan OEM. For that price though I would rather go aftermarket performance calipers. What are your experiences and ideas? Thanks.
 

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For my 1988 Mazda truck, I have an O'Reilly rebuilt caliper that's been fine. Another time, I rebuilt the one on the other side, and that has been OK too.

My 1998 and 2004 Frontiers have not needed any brake hydraulic repairs.
 

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Just about all the ones they sell at all the auto parts houses are just Remaned Nissan OEM calipers. Not sure about the cardones but when you go to autozone, Oreilly's, etc and it asks for a Core then its remaned Nissan OEM. Look closely at the pics you'll see the Nissan Logo on all of them.
 

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It's crazy, They ALL remanufacture these calipers. It's just some pistons, orings, slider pins etc. How hard is it to reman these things and not have them fail. What is one company using superior O rings or something. I mean all the rebuild stuff is cheap to begin with. But like Cardone anything is Grade A HorseShit imo. I know they make stuff that works but.....
 

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Discussion Starter #7
It's crazy, They ALL remanufacture these calipers. It's just some pistons, orings, slider pins etc. How hard is it to reman these things and not have them fail. What is one company using superior O rings or something. I mean all the rebuild stuff is cheap to begin with. But like Cardone anything is Grade A HorseShit imo. I know they make stuff that works but.....
The Cardone (once you use their part, your Car is Done) says it uses a phenolic piston. Maybe that's some plastic type crap that flexs and leaks. Had this caliper just under 2 years. Sounds like a lot, but the way I use the truck, it's like 7k miles. Seems like parts should last longer. I have better things to do than re-do stuff I've already done before....
 

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The Cardone (once you use their part, your Car is Done) says it uses a phenolic piston. Maybe that's some plastic type crap that flexs and leaks. Had this caliper just under 2 years. Sounds like a lot, but the way I use the truck, it's like 7k miles. Seems like parts should last longer. I have better things to do than re-do stuff I've already done before....
Phenolic plastic has been used for many years for brake pistons. It's heat resistant, lightweight and has good strength properties. They are better than steel or aluminum pistons when it comes to resisting heat transfer to the brake fluid and they don't corrode. The biggest difference between remanufactured parts (of any type) is the quality of the remanufacturing and the parts that are used in the process. Granted, there's not much to brake caliper parts other than a seal, piston and pin boots and pin bushings and maybe new pins and hardware. But there can be a difference in the labor process; are they just cleaned-up and slapped together or do they properly measure and inspect the bore and hone it? It can be hard to tell from the consumer point, so it's best to stick with a reputable brand name. I do like Power Stop's powder coated caliper assemblies, but they can be a bit more expensive. AC Delco brake parts are almost always re-branded Raybestos parts, which isn't a bad thing. Beck~Arnley and Centric are brands that also have pretty good reputations. The cheap "Cardone Ultra" and "Cardone Select" parts are usually decent, but the "A1 Cardone" parts can be hit-or-miss. For some vehicles, but not all, Nissan does offer "Value Line" brake parts; they are still a bit costly but have OE quality and are much less expensive than the "genuine Nissan original part" replacements.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Phenolic plastic has been used for many years for brake pistons. It's heat resistant, lightweight and has good strength properties. They are better than steel or aluminum pistons when it comes to resisting heat transfer to the brake fluid and they don't corrode. The biggest difference between remanufactured parts (of any type) is the quality of the remanufacturing and the parts that are used in the process. Granted, there's not much to brake caliper parts other than a seal, piston and pin boots and pin bushings and maybe new pins and hardware. But there can be a difference in the labor process; are they just cleaned-up and slapped together or do they properly measure and inspect the bore and hone it? It can be hard to tell from the consumer point, so it's best to stick with a reputable brand name. I do like Power Stop's powder coated caliper assemblies, but they can be a bit more expensive. AC Delco brake parts are almost always re-branded Raybestos parts, which isn't a bad thing. Beck~Arnley and Centric are brands that also have pretty good reputations. The cheap "Cardone Ultra" and "Cardone Select" parts are usually decent, but the "A1 Cardone" parts can be hit-or-miss. For some vehicles, but not all, Nissan does offer "Value Line" brake parts; they are still a bit costly but have OE quality and are much less expensive than the "genuine Nissan original part" replacements.
All good points. I looked at OE Nissan stuff and they appear to be rebuilt as well and were almost $300. I would pay that for new, but found it pricey for rebuilt. I'm sure they are good quality though. I bought the last pair of AC Delco Professional calipers on Rockauto. Hopefully that doesn't mean parts are going away for our "old" trucks.

I could have done a warranty on my old one, but then I would have the same poor quality when they sent me the replacement. The price difference was only about $20 between AC and Cardone. That said, I'm not sure why I bought the cheaper ones in the first place.
 

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When you swap out those calipers, take the time to flush the brake lines.
Keep flushing until the brake fluid being flushed out is the same color as the new stuff.
Anytime you do brake work, spend the $10 for a quart of brake fluid and flush it. It only takes 20 minutes tops, and you protect your lines, calipers, and ABS pump.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
When you swap out those calipers, take the time to flush the brake lines.
Keep flushing until the brake fluid being flushed out is the same color as the new stuff.
Anytime you do brake work, spend the $10 for a quart of brake fluid and flush it. It only takes 20 minutes tops, and you protect your lines, calipers, and ABS pump.
Good advice. Mine's pretty clean, I've had it apart several times for brake hoses, master cylinder, calipers, and general flushing. Clean fluid is a must with as expensive as ABS systems are now, it's cheap insurance.
 
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