Nissan Frontier Forum banner
1 - 10 of 10 Posts

· Registered
Joined
·
29 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
New 2016 CC 4.0 AT. SV My new truck has the VDC switch but not the E-locker. The dealer said that turning off the the VDC engages a full posi-traction. He also said this motor will smoke the tires in the first three gears. I have not tried it and prolly won't. I understand that turning off the VDC will help in certain situations like slipping in the mud. I've had that issue in the Charger that I drive professionally. What is the advantage having the e-locker? I live in the middle of NC so snow is kinda rare, we do get a few weeks of nasty potential ice storms etc but it's not enough to justify 4x4 just for that.

Thanx in advance,
Mike
 

· Registered
Joined
·
434 Posts
The advantage of the E-Locker is that it locks your two rear wheels together, allowing drive on both rear wheels even if one is loosing traction. The ABLS limited slip works whether the VDC control is on or not and it applies the brake to the wheel that is slipping causing power to be transferred to the non slipping wheel.
 

· Administrator
Joined
·
7,241 Posts
The dealer is overstating how the truck works.

With the VDC on, the truck will regulate the brakes on all 4 wheels to maintain traction and proper forward control of the vehicle. It will also pull back throttle if it detects too much wheel spin.

If you turn off the VDC it disables the throttle control portion of the system while leaving the active braking still on. so yes, it will do a good job of regulating the drive wheels.

with that said, yes, the truck will do a perfectly fine job of spinning its tires if you stand on the throttle from a stop.

And, not sure what part of the country you live in, but I do suggest that you get familiar with how the truck responds with the VDC on and off. Most people are critics of it because they don't understand how it works. Try some heavy throttle in a safe location on an unpaved area or snow with the VDC on and off. You will see how different the truck performs right away and have a better understanding when it will be beneficial to turn it off.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
29 Posts
Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Great replies, thanx!!
I am in central NC and don't see a lot of snow and it disappears quickly. We do see more ice though. Does an e-locker work like a Detroit locker where the inside wheel chirps on turns? Given my environment would a locker provide more control? Or, will the VDC/ABLS be sufficient for most expected conditions? I do not plan to go off road intentionally. :) I did not see the need for the added expense, higher insurance, lower fuel milage, increased maintenance of a 4wd. This is a new truck so I don't plan to do much to it for a while. But, what are the options for a locker down the road in a few years.
 

· Re-Moderator
Joined
·
13,752 Posts
Given my environment would a locker provide more control?
Actually, less control...more squirrely, more likely for the rear end to go sideways, more difficult to pull out of a skid. You don't want to drive around on ice with a locker engaged. Unless you're in 12+ inches of snow or you actually get stuck and can't drive forward, you're better off with open diffs on a snow covered road.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
1,324 Posts
The e-locker is not a Detroit locker. It is an open differential until engaged at which point both shafts are solidly locked together. You don't have it, don't worry about it.

VDC is electronic stability control and traction control together. Usually keep you from looping it out when you throttle too much in a turn. Cuts throttle and pulses some brakes here and there. At times it feels like the hand of god reaching down and keeping the truck going where it is pointed.

Turn it off and you loose the traction control (you can spin tires) and the electronic stability control (you can do doughnuts). But you still have the electronic limited slip function. That is the brakes will apply to the tire spinning much faster then the one that isn't, to get both tires spinning at roughly the same speed. It does not cut back the engine power doing so. It does require a slightly different technique when driving off-road. Normally the instructions are to lift off the throttle when you spin tires to not dig in, this you need the wheel spin for the brakes to shift the torque to the other tire on the axle. (this is where the locker comes in handy, you can drive slow enough to not need the wheel spin)

Overall these systems working amazingly well. It is all and more than most anyone will need. If it isn't enough, you are probably so screwed anyway that anything more aggressive would just got you in deeper. Or you are that hard core guy that is just pushing things further and further. But for the average joe, in normal usage, it is pretty amazing what the truck will do.
 

· Administrator
Joined
·
7,241 Posts
The e-locker is not a Detroit locker. It is an open differential until engaged at which point both shafts are solidly locked together. You don't have it, don't worry about it.

VDC is electronic stability control and traction control together. Usually keep you from looping it out when you throttle too much in a turn. Cuts throttle and pulses some brakes here and there. At times it feels like the hand of god reaching down and keeping the truck going where it is pointed.

Turn it off and you loose the traction control (you can spin tires) and the electronic stability control (you can do doughnuts). But you still have the electronic limited slip function. That is the brakes will apply to the tire spinning much faster then the one that isn't, to get both tires spinning at roughly the same speed. It does not cut back the engine power doing so. It does require a slightly different technique when driving off-road. Normally the instructions are to lift off the throttle when you spin tires to not dig in, this you need the wheel spin for the brakes to shift the torque to the other tire on the axle. (this is where the locker comes in handy, you can drive slow enough to not need the wheel spin)

Overall these systems working amazingly well. It is all and more than most anyone will need. If it isn't enough, you are probably so screwed anyway that anything more aggressive would just got you in deeper. Or you are that hard core guy that is just pushing things further and further. But for the average joe, in normal usage, it is pretty amazing what the truck will do.
Agreed. I had an episode on a slippery curved bridge deck where the slip light came on long before I realized there was an issue and the truck crab walked but the truck stayed pointed straight and saved my skin. There was a good couple of seconds from the time the slip light came on to where I felt anything wrong. by that time I had covered a few hundred feet, so without it, It would have been too late.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
29 Posts
Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Thanx again for the great explanations. It seems to be quite similar to systems by other manufacturers. I had a Z06 Vette that used to "correct" me before I realized I needed or could execute a planned compensation. I drive a Charger professionally and I have to punch the traction control off when I want to turn around on someone at any significant speed or the car just kinda turns into a wet noodle. But, after I'm just about turned around I punch it back on and the system sets my trim and ballast back right. It is amazing technology indeed.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
43 Posts
But you still have the electronic limited slip function. That is the brakes will apply to the tire spinning much faster then the one that isn't, to get both tires spinning at roughly the same speed.
Is there a way to turn that off too? Is there ever a situation where you'd want one tire to spin much faster than the other? I guess when both tires break traction they'll be spinning at about the same speed anyway.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
475 Posts
Late to the party here, but the electronic limited slip works really really good on these trucks.

We get some snow and ice here in Dallas, and my little 2WD Frontier has passed full size 4X4 trucks up hills when it's slippery. It's very noisy (you can hear the brakes pulsate), but it works so good!!
 
1 - 10 of 10 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top