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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
If you have a question about lifting your truck, please read this thread before posting your question. There is a good chance that it will be answered here. If you notice any errors, please PM me.

READ THIS FIRST: I will no longer be answering individual questions on lifting member's trucks via PM. I compiled the information in this sticky by doing my own independent research, but I am not - I repeat, I am not - a suspension expert. If you still have questions after reading the sticky, do a little of your own independent research and/or ask your question on the forum. If you create a post with your question, you will get answers from a number of individuals with varying opinions, not just mine. We have a lot of knowledgeable members here - use them as a resource!

FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS
How high can I safely lift my 4x4 truck? Why? What if I want to lift it higher?
Generally, 3" is the recommended maximum amount of suspension lift for a 4x4 truck with IFS. The UCA's on our trucks are the biggest limiting factor. It is also very difficult to get good alignment numbers on stock control arms with greater than 2.5" of lift. I would suggest no more than 2.5" of lift with stock Frontier UCA's, 3" with aftermarket Frontier UCA's or stock Titan UCA's, and 4" with aftermarket Titan UCA's. Additional limiting factors are down travel, ride quality and CV angles. If you want to lift your 4x4 higher, you will either need to use a drop bracket kit or combine a body lift with your suspension lift.

These numbers also apply to 2WD trucks that are *not* running spindle lifts. With a spindle lift, you can go considerably higher.

What size tire can I run with XYZ amount of lift?
Generally, the maximum tire size you can fit without rubbing and without trimming is 265/75/16 (equivalent of a 32" tire). This is the factory tire size on the Pro-4X and Nismo models, and most brands will fit on a stock truck with no modifications. Many people fit 285/75/16 (about 33") tires on a lifted truck with minor melting or trimming in the front. 35" tires will fit on a drop bracket kit with a moderate amount of trimming, but it is not recommended to run 35" tires on anything except a "street vehicle" without other modifications.

Titan swaps and most aftermarket wheels will increase the potential for rubbing and consequently make it more likely that you will need to trim or do a melt mod.

When I lift my truck, will I need to get new shocks? Longer brake lines? Will I need to get an alignment done?
Front shocks generally do not require replacement. Longer rear shocks are not required for lifts up to 2". Rear shocks should be replaced with longer rear shocks for any suspension lift 2" or higher, particularly for off road use or when using shackles, AAL's or new leaf packs. Front brake lines require replacement when the lift significantly increases down travel (i.e, Titan swap). Rear brake lines may need to be unclipped at greater than 1.5-2" of lift, or replaced with longer lines when the truck is lifted over 3-4". ABS lines may need to be unclipped.

An alignment is always required anytime your suspension is altered! Frontiers built after mid-2005 may require aftermarket adjustable camber bolts in order to align properly, particularly if they are lifted over 2". (Early 2005 Frontiers came with adjustable camber bolts.)

What is coil bucket contact? Is it bad for my truck? How do I prevent it?
Coil bucket contact is when the coil bucket (top plate) of your shock assembly contacts your upper control arm. When this happens, there will be a loud metal-to-metal clanking noise. Coil bucket contact is something to think about when lifting your truck 2" or higher. It is most common with spacer lifts. If coil bucket contact occurs frequently, the coil bucket may scratch or gouge the upper control arm but it generally won't "hurt" the truck. Noise from coil bucket contact can be prevented by the use of bump stops or aftermarket upper control arms.

Which lift kits will work for a 2018?
Frontier suspension has not changed since 2005. Any lift kit for 2005-2017 will also work on a 2018.

Can I stack front suspension lift components to lift my truck higher? What about rear lift components?
It is generally a bad idea to stack front lift suspension components (i.e., spacers plus height adjustable shocks, although some members have had good luck with this when keeping the total lift 2.5" or less). Coil bucket clearance, down travel, ride quality, CV angles and stress to the individual components are all reasons NOT to!

There are some exceptions. 2WD trucks can stack lift spindles with anything else to achieve greater lift. Some coilover and spacer combinations work fine as well.

The rear is a different story. Stacking blocks and/or shackles and/or AAL's is no problem at all, provided your shocks and brake lines are long enough.

What is suspension travel? Why is it important?
PRG Greg covers this important topic in his Travel Numbers sticky.

How do I install my new lift kit?
There are many great write ups on this forum that explain how to install various lift setups. If a how to exists, I have included a blue hyperlink in the subtitle of the component (for example, if you click on the big blue "Add-A-Leafs" subtitle, it will take you to Nomad 13's installation write up).

Here is another great write up for installing a front lift: Comprehensive Front Lift Installation Instructions for 2005+ Frontiers

You used an acronym, but I'm new to this stuff and I don't understand what it means!
Check this thread: Acronyms 101


SUSPENSION LIFTS
FRONT

Spacers

Lift amount: 1.5" to 3"
Uses: Street use, light off roading.
Pros: Inexpensive. Fairly easy to install. Ride quality is close to factory.
Cons: Suspension travel is limited with larger spacers. High chance of coil bucket contact with spacers over 2".
Notes: Noise from coil bucket contact can be eliminated with bump stops (cheap) or aftermarket upper control arms (better method but more expensive). Aftermarket UCAs highly recommended for 3" spacers. Some kits come with bump stops. PRG also offers inexpensive 0.5" and 1" spacers which can be added to specific existing lifts.
Cost: $60-$190 (more for kits)
Brands: ADF, Calmini, Daystar, NissTec, PRG, Pro Comp, ReadyLift (kit with bump stops, camber bolts, shackles for rear), Revtek (kit with blocks for rear), Rough Country, Truxxx (kit with bump stops and blocks for rear)

Height Adjustable Shocks
Lift amount: 0.5" to 2"
Uses: Street use, light off roading.
Pros: More balanced suspension travel than with a spacer lift.
Cons: Coil spring compressor required for installation (Bilsteins only). In the past, there were reports of Rancho QuickLift shocks leaking over time.
Notes: Some report that the Bilsteins are very stiff when adjusted at maximum height but most feel the ride quality is improved at a more modest setting. Read this thread before installing your coils onto your Bilsteins!
The Rancho QuickLift shocks have been revamped. They now include new coils and come pre-assembled with a new upper mount. The stiffness is adjustable.
Cost: About $200 for the Bilsteins (shocks only); about $350 for the Ranchos (including shocks, new coils and upper mounts)
Brands: Bilstein, Rancho

Lift Coils
Lift amount: 1.5" to 2"
Uses: Light to moderate off roading. Support for a heavy bumper.
Pros: Better articulation than with spacer lift. Low chance of coil bucket contact.
Cons: Coil spring compressor required for installation. Can be stiff.
Notes: There are medium duty coils for trucks with stock bumpers and heavy duty coils for trucks with aftermarket bumpers and winches. Heavy duty coils will feel stiff on a vehicle with a stock bumper but may add a small amount of additional lift. Old Man Emu Nitrocharger Sport Shocks are recommended for use with Old Man Emu coils.
Cost: About $170
Brands: Old Man Emu

Front Lifts continued on next post...
 

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Discussion Starter #2 (Edited)
continued from previous post

Bilstein Height Adjustable Shocks with Lift Coils
Lift amount: 2.5" to 3"
Uses: Light off roading. Support for a heavy bumper.
Pros: A relatively inexpensive way to gain lift without using spacers. MD coils with Bilsteins at the stock setting (lowest notch) will provide about 2.5" of lift (YMMV).
Cons: Coil spring compressor required for installation. Can be stiff. Going any higher than stock setting on the Bilsteins will cause the rebound to feel harsh and will only add a small amount of additional lift. Many users feel that the ride is too harsh if the sway bar is left on. MD or HD coils may cause undue stress to the Bilstein shocks.
Notes: Old Man Emu and TJM make medium duty coils for trucks with stock bumpers and heavy duty coils for trucks with aftermarket bumpers and winches. Heavy duty coils will feel harsh on a vehicle with a stock bumper. Setting the Bilsteins at stock height is recommended for optimum ride quality. Please note that adjustable Bilsteins were not designed for use with anything but stock coils, and OME coils were not designed for use with anything but OME shocks - user beware! Read this thread before installing your coils onto your Bilsteins! Many people who are running this lift have removed the sway bar. This softens up the ride significantly. (Caution: Removing the sway bar may create additional body roll during emergency maneuvers. Perform this modification at your own risk.)
Cost: $350-400
Brands: Bilstein (struts) and Old Man Emu or TJM (coils)

Economy Coilovers
Lift amount: Up to 2"
Uses: Light to moderate off roading. Support for a heavy bumper.
Pros: Suspension travel slightly increased. Less expensive than performance coilovers.
Cons: Less lift and suspension travel than with performance coilovers.
Notes: Can use LD or HD springs depending on your needs.
Cost: $400-700.
Brands: NissTec (TJM/Bilstein and Eibach/Bilstein).

Performance Coilovers
Lift amount: Up to 2.5" with stock UCAs; up to 3" with aftermarket UCA's
Uses: Moderate to heavy off roading. Support for a heavy bumper.
Pros: Suspension travel moderately increased (aftermarket UCAs will add additional suspension travel).
Cons: Expensive. Require periodic servicing. Noise and vibration damping isn't as good as the stock setup.
Notes: Can use LD or HD springs depending on your needs.
Cost: $800-1,500. Aftermarket UCAs will add an additional $420-$700.
Brands: Coilovers - Fox, Icon, King, NissTec (TJM Extended Travel), Radflo, Sway-A-Way. UCAs - Calmini, CST, NissTec, PRG, Total Chaos.

Spindles
Lift amount: 4"
Uses: Street use.
Pros: Good ride quality (close to factory).
Cons: Expensive. Relatively difficult to install.
Notes: 2WD ONLY! Cannot be used on 4WD trucks! Spindles widen the stance of the truck slightly.
Cost: About $800
Brands: CST.

Budget Titan Swaphttp://www.clubfrontier.org/forums/f103/dan-s-titan-swap-thread-84167/
Lift amount: Up to about 3" on 4WD trucks (can go higher on 2WD with spindles)
Uses: Moderate off roading, light rock crawling.
Pros: Greater suspension travel than most lift setups, at a fraction of the cost of an aftermarket Titan swap (below). Front end may be beefier (some Titan components are stronger than comparable Frontier parts). Significantly better ride quality than when using Frontier control arms.
Cons: Time-consuming to install. Vehicle will have more difficulty navigating narrow trails.
Notes: A "Titan swap" replaces the stock Frontier UCAs and LCAs with Titan UCAs and LCAs. Tie rod extensions and longer brake lines are also needed, and 4WD trucks require extended axles or a Titan front diff and axles. The Titan swap by itself adds minimal lift; most of the lift is achieved through aftermarket coilovers and/or spindles. Vehicle will have a wider stance in the front.
Cost: A few hundred dollars, depending on how many junkyard parts vs. new parts are used, and the number of aftermarket performance upgrades included.
Brands: Stock Titan UCA's and LCA's can be purchased from junkyards. Most of the other components are available through PRG.

Titan Swap using Aftermarket UCA's & Coilovershttp://www.clubfrontier.org/forums/f103/dan-s-titan-swap-thread-84167/
Lift amount: Up to 4" on 4WD trucks when aftermarket coilovers are used (can go higher on 2WD with spindles)
Uses: Heavy off roading, rock crawling, prerunning.
Pros: This is considered a "mid travel" set-up; suspension travel is greatly increased (depending on coilovers, UCAs, etc). Front end may be beefier (some Titan components are stronger than comparable Frontier parts). Very good ride quality.
Cons: Expensive. Time-consuming to install. Vehicle will have more difficulty navigating narrow trails.
Notes: A "Titan swap" replaces the stock Frontier UCAs and LCAs with Titan UCAs and LCAs. Tie rod extensions and longer brake lines are also needed, and 4WD trucks require extended axles or a Titan front diff and axles. The Titan swap by itself adds minimal lift; most of the lift is achieved through aftermarket coilovers and/or spindles. Aftermarket Titan UCA's Titan swap-specific coilovers are recommended to get the most travel out of this set-up. Vehicle will have a wider stance in the front.
Cost: $2000-3000.
Brands: Dirt King, PRG.

Drop Bracket Kithttp://www.clubfrontier.org/forums/f26/db-lifts-good-bad-ugly-101993/
Lift amount: 5" to 6"
Uses: With spacers - Street use, light off roading. With coilovers - Light to moderate off roading.
Pros: Lots of lift. Improved approach, departure and breakover angles. Ability to run larger tires with minor trimming.
Cons: Expensive. Limits ground clearance at the front crossmember. Center of gravity will be high. Drive shaft vibrations may occur. Installation requires cutting into the frame. As is, these kits are primarily for looks (although they perform well off-road with the appropriate upgrades).
Notes: Short of using a body lift with your suspension lift (or doing a Titan swap), this is the only way you can lift a 4WD over 3"! These lifts are offered as an entire kit including drop bracket, spacers, rear lift components, etc. They can be upgraded with aftermarket coilovers and other performance parts.
Cost: $1,400-$2,000 with spacers ($2,000-$3,000 with coilovers)
Brands: Calmini, Fabtech

Titan Swap with Drop Bracket Kit
Lift amount: Up to 9" on 4WD trucks (possibly higher depending on mods)
Uses: Moderate to heavy off roading.
Pros: Lots of lift, lots of suspension travel.
Cons: Expensive. Installation of drop bracket kit requires cutting into the frame. Time-consuming to install. Vehicle will have more difficulty navigating narrow trails. Center of gravity will be high.
Notes: This set-up provides the highest possible amount of suspension lift. Coilovers are recommended to get the most travel out of this set-up.
Cost: Varies ($3,500 and up)
Brands: Dirt King or PRG (Titan swap kit), Calmini or Fabtech (drop bracket kit)
 

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Discussion Starter #3 (Edited)
continued from previous post

REAR
Blocks

Lift amount: 1" to 2"
Pros: Inexpensive.
Cons: Axle wrap with the larger blocks (typically not a huge problem on Frontiers). Can weaken the leaf springs over time. No added flex.
Notes: New U-bolts are needed (come with most block kits when purchased new).
Cost: $65-$90
Brands: Calmini, PRG; also included in some spacer kits

Shackles
Lift amount: 1/2" to 2"
Pros: Inexpensive. Easy to install. Factory ride maintained. Add a small amount of flex.
Cons: Leaf springs may flatten over time.
Notes: Some companies make adjustable-height shackles. Automotive Customizers also offers revolver shackles which offer a significant amount of flex when used with AALs.
Cost: $70-$120 ($310 for revolver shackles)
Brands: Automotive Customizers, Calmini, PRG; also included in some spacer kits

Add-A-Leafs
Lift amount: 2" to 3"
Pros: Increased load carrying capacity (in some cases). Multi-leaf AALs will add a fair amount of flex.
Cons: More difficult to install than blocks or shackles. Leaf springs may flatten over time.
Notes: New U-bolts strongly recommended.
Cost: $65-$165
Brands: Automotive Customizers, Deaver (PRG), NissTec, Prerunnerparts; also included in some spacer kits

New Leaf Pack
Lift amount: 2" to 3" (can go higher if custom or DIY)
Pros: Significantly improved ride quality. More stout than the stock leaf pack. Some brands increase load carrying capacity.
Cons: Expensive.
Notes: Some DIY'ers have pieced together hybrid leaf packs to gain lift for a fraction of the cost.
Cost: $350-$650
Brands: Alcan, Automotive Customizers, Deaver (PRG), Old Man Emu


BODY LIFTS
Lift amount: 2" to 3" in kit form. If you go the DIY route you can do a different height.
Pros: Increased body clearance and fenderwell clearance for larger tires.
Cons: Does nothing for suspension flex. Bumper relocation brackets have to be fabbed if you do not buy a kit (most kits only come with front brackets).
Cost: $75-$350
Brands: Automotive Customizers, Performance Accessories (which can be acquired through PRG), or do-it-yourself.


ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS
Thank you to all the members who contributed to this thread with your suggestions, information, and pictures of your trucks (including HarshReality001, who wrote the original lift sticky and gave me his blessing in updating it).

Thank you to everyone who has ever asked a second generation lift question as well as everyone who has ever answered one. I am NOT a suspension expert, and I did a lot of my research by browsing these forums.

BIG THANKS to FrontierNation3, who generously volunteered to locate the pictures, and domoMKIV, who assisted with the original version of this sticky.
 

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Discussion Starter #4 (Edited)

Lifted Truck Gallery

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Lift height: 1.5" front, 1" rear
Components used: Bilsteins for 1.5" Front lift and 1" block in rear with Bilstein shocks
Wheels and tires: 265/75/16 Goodyear Trailmark ATs.
Truck owner: jwp1964


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2012 Equator RMZ (Pro 4x)
Lift height: 2" front, 1.5" rear
Components used: Bilstein 5100s all around with stock springs. Adjustable fronts set to max 2". Nisstec 1.5" block in rear.
Wheels and tires: Stock rims with Spidertrax 1.5" wheel spacers/adaptors and stock tire size of 265/75/16. Falken Wildpeak at3w
Truck owner: MidTennMtneer


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Lift height: 2.25" front, 1" rear
Components used: 2" front spacer and 1.5" rear shackle.
Wheels and tires: stock sv wheels and stock 265/70r16 tires
Truck owner: Passivaggressor


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Lift height: 2.25" front, 2" rear
Components used: front 2" PRG spacer / rear 2 leaf AAL
Wheels and tires: Stock pro4x wheels stock tires
Truck owner: greystone


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Lift height: 2.25" front, 2.5" rear
Components used: Bilstein set at 1.75" and .5" PRG Spacers, Total Chaos UCAs; Bilstein 5125, Deaver 2-leaf AAL
Wheels and tires: Stock pro4x-16 with 255/85-16 Cooper Discoverer s/t maxx
Truck owner: BagerSV


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Lift height: 3" front, 2" rear
Components used: Front: Titan swap, SPC uppers, Dorman lowers, Custom top hats (Glamisdude design), 1st gen Tundra BILSTEIN 5100 shocks PN 24261425, Moog 4Runner springs PN 81092, lower spring mounts set on the lowest setting. Rear: OEM leaves, Nisstec AAL with the OEM overload spring left in place, Bilstien 5125 shocks.
Wheels and tires: OEM Pro-4X wheels, 285/75/16 Goodyear Duratracs
Truck owner: The Other Sean


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Lift height: 3.25" front , 2.5" rear
Components used: Front: Radflo 2.0 extended length coilovers with Eibach coil springs 650 lb, SPC upper control arms, Nisstec 1" coil spacer lift. Rear: PRG 2-leaf add-a-leaf , PRG lift shackles (set at highest setting) Bilstein 5125 shocks for 2-3" lift.
Wheels and tires: Stock PRO-4X rims with BF Goodrich All-Terrain T/A KO2 LT285/75-16 load range "E"
Truck owner: MNCarl


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Lift height: 3.5" front, 2.5 rear
Components used: Nisstec MK84 extended travel coil overs and Total Chaos UCAs; Old Man Emu Dakar Leaf Springs; OME greaseable shackles; Bilstein 5100 Rear Shocks
Wheels and tires: Stock Nissan wheels (powder coated) with BF Goodrich All Terrain TA KO2's 285/75/16
Truck owner: bhowdy


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Lift height: 3.5" front, 2.5" rear
Components used: King Off-Road custom 2.5 shocks, Total Chaos UCAs; Bilstein 5125, Deaver AAL
Wheels and Tires: Level 8 Bully Pro 6 16x8.5" -16 with 265/75-16 BF Goodrich KO2’s
Truck owner: raine


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Lift height: 3.5" front, 4" rear
Components: Titan swap- Tundra Bilstein 5100s, OEM 4Runner springs, gen 1 custom tophats, Ebay Total Chaos clone uppers, OME Dakar MD leaf packs (removed overloads, Xterra AAL), Nisstec 4* axle shims, Pro Comp MX6 rear shocks (P/N: MX6050)
Wheels and tires: stock Pro4X and 285-75-16 Cooper AT3s
Truck owner: Glamisdude


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Lift height: 4" front, 3.5" rear
Components used: Front: T-Swap (SPC UCA's, 1st Gen Tundra 5100's (New PN), Custom top hat (Thanks Glamisdude), Eibach 600lb Springs, Nisstec Coilover Adjustment Collars). Rear: Alcan Leaf Springs 2" Lift 300lbs, Nisstec Rear Lift Shackles (1.5" setting), Bilstein 5125 for 3" lift
Wheels and tires: 285/75R16 Cooper ST Maxx, Stock Pro 4X wheels
Truck owner: 5280Chris
20170627_144852

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Lift height: 4.5" front, 4" rear
Components used: Front: Stock coil overs and springs, Daystar 2" spacer, CST lift spindles (2wd), goodridge ss extended brake lines. Rear: Prg adjustable shackles set on lowest setting, Bilstein 33-186542 5125 shocks 28" length, hybrid leaf pack (3 frontier leafs, 3 Xterra leafs, no over load spring) 3.5° axle degree shims.
Wheels and tires: Level 8 mk6 wheels. 16"x9", factory lug pattern. Cooper discoverer ATP 265-75-16
Truck owner: d7k8


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Lift height: 6" front, 4" rear
Components used: Titan swap with 2.0 Radflos and SPC UCAs. Rear 5100 Bilsteins with K83 add-a-leafs and nisstec shackles.
Wheels and tires: Black Level 8 MK6's, BFG 285/70r17 KM2 Mud Terrains
Truck owner: SCDeerman
 

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Discussion Starter #5 (Edited)
Updated 7/9/11:
* "General information" moved from the end of the first post to the beginning. Changed to FAQ format.
* "Acknowledgements" section moved to the end (but I'm not any less thankful).
* Added the section "Bilstein Height Adjustable Shocks with OME Lift Coils".
* Several other small changes and clarifications made throughout.

Updated 12/22/11:
* Added NissTec products to the appropriate sections.
* Updated the "Height Adjustable Shocks" section.
* Discussed sway bar removal in the "Bilstein Height Adjustable Shocks with OME Lift Coils" section.
* Rewrote the "Titan swap" section (most notably, added a description of what a Titan swap is and what is needed in the "notes" parts of that section).
* Made some small clarifications throughout.

Updated 12/28/11:
* Added the section "Titan Swap with Drop Bracket Kit."
* Methods for lifting the front of the truck are now split between the first and second post because I was running out of room.
 

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Discussion Starter #6 (Edited)
Updated 3/23/12:
* A "Uses" section has been added for each type of front lift.
* Vendor names are now hyperlinks.
* The subtitle for each type of lift is now a hyperlink to an installation thread (if one exists).
* Numerous other hyperlinks added where relevant.
* Coilover subsection has been divided into "Economy Coilovers" and "Performance Coilovers."
* Several clarifications and revisions made throughout.

Updated 6/6/12:
* Pictures completely revamped to show a wider variety of lift heights and tire/wheel combos.
* Updated some brands and costs.

I received numerous suggestions for these recent updates - thank you to everyone who contributed an idea! Extra thanks to FrontierNation3 who took the time to compile almost all of the pictures.

If I used a picture of your truck for this update, please make sure the info that I have on your lift, tires and wheels is correct. Send me a PM if there are any mistakes or if you would like your picture removed.

As always, if you notice any errors or want to provide any other feedback, just send me a PM.
 

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Discussion Starter #7 (Edited)
Updated 9/28/14:
* A couple FAQ's added. Existing FAQ's edited for clarity.
* "Titan Swap" section divided into "Budget Titan Swap" and "Titan Swap using Aftermarket UCA's & Coilovers."
* Vendors and prices updated to stay current.
* Several hyperlinks updated or added.
* Broken pics removed and a couple new pics added.
* Numerous section edited for accuracy and clarity.

Updated 10/1/14:
* Changed the hyperlinks for the Titan swaps.

Updated 10/4/14:
* Added Dirt King to list of vendors.
 

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All suspension lift is valid up to model year 2016, nothing has changed regarding suspension set-up on the Frontier for 11 years.

EDIT: Same for 2017 and probably 2018 as well.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
PLEASE NOTE: I will no longer be answering individual questions on lifting member's trucks via PM. I compiled the information in this sticky by doing my own independent research, but I am not - I repeat, I am not - a suspension expert. If you still have questions after reading the sticky, do a little of your own independent research and/or ask your question on the forum. If you create a post with your question, you will get answers from a number of individuals with varying opinions, not just mine. We have a lot of knowledgeable members here - use them as a resource!
 
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