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They are sick as hell. I got to see one up close awhile back, they are ugly but effective. I didn't get to drive it, but I got to watch it driven.
 

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So they mounted tractor wheel/tires and 4 wheel steer on an old diesel dodge ram with what apears to be solid mounted axles. Then they drive it around in what looks like about a foot of snow.

The guy is a "master fabricator" and this is supposed to show off his skill? The truck is using the stock frame, no cage work that i can see, the only fabrication was the mounting the axles, running hydraulic lines to the rear, butcher the fenders to mount the tires, and possibly machining hub adapters to accept the tractor wheels. Other than that the truck apears to be bone stock...

Anyone with a MIG, a spare dodge, and a severe lack of taste/common sense could build that truck. You dont want skinny tires for snow, you want fat rubber you can air down for floatation. Extreamly tall wheels will let you 'stilt' through but thats an extreamly impractical and inefficient way of going about things. The rear steer is redundant and unessesary. And running any modern vehicle without suspension is retarded, especially if your a so called "master fabricator". Using a CNC machine to cut plate to mount axles is like using an exacto knife to cut your steak.
 

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:laugh:red is my hero:laugh::laugh: thats great
 

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So they mounted tractor wheel/tires and 4 wheel steer on an old diesel dodge ram with what apears to be solid mounted axles. Then they drive it around in what looks like about a foot of snow.

The guy is a "master fabricator" and this is supposed to show off his skill? The truck is using the stock frame, no cage work that i can see, the only fabrication was the mounting the axles, running hydraulic lines to the rear, butcher the fenders to mount the tires, and possibly machining hub adapters to accept the tractor wheels. Other than that the truck apears to be bone stock...

Anyone with a MIG, a spare dodge, and a severe lack of taste/common sense could build that truck. You dont want skinny tires for snow, you want fat rubber you can air down for floatation. Extreamly tall wheels will let you 'stilt' through but thats an extreamly impractical and inefficient way of going about things. The rear steer is redundant and unessesary. And running any modern vehicle without suspension is retarded, especially if your a so called "master fabricator". Using a CNC machine to cut plate to mount axles is like using an exacto knife to cut your steak.
did you actually watch the video? its not 4 wheel steer its rear wheel steer. the only part of the frame is from the motor to the rear of the cab, after that its custom. as far as the tires, most agree that skinnier tires are better for snow because it allows you to sink in slightly giving your tread a better grip. YMMV of course.

oh, and i love the red green show.
 

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did you actually watch the video? its not 4 wheel steer its rear wheel steer. the only part of the frame is from the motor to the rear of the cab, after that its custom. as far as the tires, most agree that skinnier tires are better for snow because it allows you to sink in slightly giving your tread a better grip. YMMV of course.

oh, and i love the red green show.
The frame is a stock dodge truck frame, possibly cropped after the rear axle. the cab is sitting on the frame as it would in a stock truck, nothing custom about it, unless sawz-alling a foot or two of frame off the back is "custom".

On second look, it is only rear steer, this only makes the whole build even more rediculous. Now you have a two ton vehicle with the stability of a fork lift.:fantastic: The truck is incapable of anything more than trolling around at parking lot speeds. This was appearently nessesitated by the moronic design decision to put tractor tires on it in the first place and lack of turning clearance at the front of the truck.

Better grip for what? If the truck is going to be plowing snow in a parking lot and trolling around in a field of one foot snow, what grip advantage do tractor tires provide over a set of wide footprint studded snow floatation tires? Don't give me that its 'capable' of some serious snow offroading, it has no suspension!


Oh, and I love uncle red. TRUE master fabricator.
 

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dude, 24 seconds into the video, there is NO FRAME behind the cab. its a custom single rail that the rear axle is mounted to. actually, studded snow tires are thin tires not wide. look into any rally racing car that races on snow. as for the suspension, why does there need to be any for snow? there not rock climbing. it is designed for snow covered roads and fields. i seriously doubt its street legal.
 

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uhm...not getting into the argument here. but red is a real OG, just gonna put that out there
 

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dude, 24 seconds into the video, there is NO FRAME behind the cab. its a custom single rail that the rear axle is mounted to. actually, studded snow tires are thin tires not wide. look into any rally racing car that races on snow. as for the suspension, why does there need to be any for snow? there not rock climbing. it is designed for snow covered roads and fields. i seriously doubt its street legal.
So they cropped the frame to allow the tires to turn... another design compromise to allow the pointless tires to be fitted.

On road studded snow tires are 'small' to mount on otherwise stock vehicles. A truck meant for offroading in snow would use big fat soft snow tires that can be aired down for floatation. If all the guy wanted to do with build a truck that could diddle around in a snow covered field. He could have left the dodge stock and done pretty well. If he planned on seeing a foot or more of snow, he could have lifted it a bit and fitted real offroad snow tires and done better. Hell he would have done better with wide bolt on truck tracks and had a safer, faster, more efficient vehicle.


What we have here is a case of someone being 'different' for the sake of being different. there is no point, no advantage to building the truck that way. He just did it for the shock factor, like the orange and green trucks with 62" of lift that never go off highway, or the ricers with 22" rims and 13 TV's mounted to the back of the car.
 

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Ok, for one, a snow mobile uses a belt...a wide belt. When a snow mobile was first created it was a blank sheet, and a wide belt worked best then...and now. The reason that rally cars use skinny tires is because they race in 12 inches or LESS of snow. If one was inclined to build a truck like this... not sure what there smoking, but they didn't do there math. Well let me restate that. If they want to drive that truck in deep snow...as in ski slope deep, this is the worst possible design. That thing is a rototiller. It would dig its self up to it frame the first hill it came to. Unless it will only be used in shallow snow.

Its a lmao and point my finger at it.
 
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