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Air bags are nice, and unlike helper springs (additional leaf), can be deflated to let the truck feel stock again when not towing.
WDH are nice, but they work by lifting the center of the rig (at the hitch) to put more weight on the front tires (and rear trailer axle if a tandem axle). This means the truck rear tires are unloaded. This is fine as long as the rear is not unweighted too much. It might take so much lifting force to get the truck level that almost no weight is on the rear. Try driving up a slight gravel slope with a WDH at max and you will spin out easily.
WDH is all about proper balance, WDH is meant to offer some help, but not meant to offer a LOT of help.
WDH will need to be unhooked if you find yourself on uneven dirt roads or roads with dips that will make the up/down angle between the truck n trailer abnormally increase, which will break the WDH springs, or bend the trailer or bend something. Not so with ari bags or helper springs, however.
Remember trucks are made to be rear high when unloaded so that when loaded (as expected they will be, because - truck) the truck will drop an inch or two in the rear. When trying to use WDH, or bags, or springs do not try to get back to the unloaded rear height, just get the truck generally kind-a level. An inch or two sag in the rear is expected, and evens out with the front since it is rear-high when unloaded.

Trailer brakes will be a good idea. My bicycle has bigger brake pads than these trucks, so be glad they are 4-wheel disc unlike the Tacoma's. The trailer should be set up so that it is powerful enough to stop itself, and then the truck can stop itself and not wear out pads / heat up faster.

People talk a lot about length of the trailer. As far as just the motor and trans goes: In calm winds the length is not an issue, actually, the longer the better as a long trailer allows the turbulance created at the front to calm down so it flows off the back smoother. However, in crosswinds (hello Kansas) the wind is actually hitting the side of the trailer more than the front so here length does increase frontal area.
Frontal area is really the biggest factor for towing on flat roads. At highway speed the aerodynamics are everything, and those tall and wide boxes called campers push a lot of air.
Also, if you would tow your camper backwards it would be much more aerodynamic. Having a sloped/ramp shaped front on a trailer is not aerodynamic. It would be better to have a block front and slope/shape the rear of the camper so air flows off of the rear smoothly. Campers with a slanted front are all gimmick and no go. Most of the air will flow around the sides and not over the roof anyway, so the "bull nose" front ends that direct the air to the sides are better and more aero. V-nose are not aero.
Look at all the RVs from the 1950s, when they were trying to be aero like the WWII planes, and you see they are all sloped at the rear. But the buying public is too confused, so manufacturers found they can sell what looks aero more than what is aero.
If you want to be more aero, increase mpg, and lower strain on truck, then get narrow and less-tall (mimmic truck width and height) and keep it as close to the truck as possible.
Keep the corners rounded like the Airstream or the similar fiberglass campers.
A camper shell on your truck will also make the rig more aero by smoothing out the airflow between truck n trailer.

If you plan on just a few short trips (under two hrs) a few times per year, then don't sweat it. However, if you want to be driving all over the country and rack up serious miles, then the Frontier is the wrong truck for anything over a small cargo trailer (narrow, low, light). Get the right truck, a 1/2 or 3/4 ton truck. A 2011 f150 with the 3.7 v-6 is more power and more torque than this 4.0 Nissan and the trans can handle more towing, and the bigger truck will not be bullied around by a trailer quite as bad as will to a Frontier. The Frontier is being reported to get 10-11 mpg towing a basic camper, where an American big truck will not notice it back there as much, a full size US truck is likely to get better mpg. Running the Frontier at its limits WILL wear it out much faster, where the full size truck will be still in its comfort zone and not get such accelerated wear. For the Frontier, I would be fine with a folding trailer, but not so with a full size one
 

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I live in Las Vegas NV and added an extra ATF Cooler, ATF temp gauge, and fans to augment the single stock fan and ATF cooler. I have a 2014 Frontier CC 4WD V6 and regularly tow a Forest River Wolf Pup single axle toy hauler.
Are those two trans coolers?
Do the fans matter at highway speeds? I always think the the moving speed is moving air faster than the fans ever could. The fans are more for when you are not on the highway. Looks like they will block more air on the highway than send through..
I'm researching to add a cooler.

 

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I just joined here after going through some of these posts about travel trailers. I'm really glad I found this group. I did a ton of research before buying my trailer, but sometimes it doesn't seem like enough. I just want to be on the right side of safety. I just finished paying off my 2011 Nissan Frontier SV. It has a Fabtech suspension lift (That Nissan had installed for me) I kept the milage down believe it or not it only has 48000 miles on it for only being 10 years old (I live close to where I work) I had a small pop up that we out grew, and wanted a little more room, and a little more comfort. Just a weekend warrior rig that could be sustainable for a week of hunting at the most. So I purchased the Jayco Jayfeather Micro 171BH. It's 20' 2" from hitch to tail, and It has a dry weight of 4030, and GVWR of 4995. I opted to have smaller propane tanks to ease the tongue weight a little, and I won't be towing it with fresh water at full capacity other than a small amount of fresh water (55gal adds a 505 lbs if full) for emergency bathroom stops, and I'll probably use more for hunting since I'll free up a little payload with less passengers. After doing some research I am within my numbers except for my payload is close, I'm pretty sure my lift, and tires took some away, and I may be really close on my GCWR. I installed an WDH, Sway bar, and Primus IQ Brake Controller. I just bought it, and still have to take it to the scales to know exactly where I'm at. I pulled it about 100 miles from the dealer to my house with just the Wife, and I. So far it pulled really nice (with only a few camping necessities like sewer hose, included blackstone grill, 30 amp power cord, water hoses ect.) I did notice it still pulled, and stopped good despite being close on my GCWR. I was able to get it up to 75 mph no problem on flat land, but definitely will keep it around 60-65 mph tops (no hurry to get there). Not too bad on the inclines with OD off. I plan on towing it with a small amount of cargo mostly in the trailer, and hardly any payload in the truck other than my two kids. I do plan on installing new brake pads and a transmission cooler with new filter, and fresh fluid on my Nissan I've seen bigger rigs on here that people are pulling with the same truck who seem to do very well
Sky Wheel Tire Vehicle Car

, and would really appreciate your advice on your experience. Here is a picture of my rig, and I will keep you updated after my weigh in, and first camping trip. Thanks, and Happy Camping everyone! Also here's a video link to my trailer.
 

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Nice camper, looks just the right size.
You are well under the Frontier 6,xxx lb tow rating, so don't sweat it. You could load it fully and still not have issues. Your tires are what they call unsprung weight, so their weight is not a factor at all in your calculations.

Don't bother with the trans cooler fan or aftermarket anything. The Fronty has an external trans cooler already. It has some sort of valve that opens when the trans fluid gets hot, so the cooler is almost never in use, it is bypassed and the trans fluid just flows through the water radiator (does not mix of course). I think the stock trans cooler kicks in well above 220 degrees, so Nissan thinks these high temps are just fine. Your trans fluid does need to get hot at times to "burn off" contaminates like water or who knows what. Install a trans temp sensor and watch the temps as you tow, you might find that you do not need to do anything. Someone else can chime in exactly what temp the stock trans cooler opens at. As long as you are under that then you are good, or, it probably ok to go over a little because at that point the trans cooler opens and you should see temps drop as that cold trans fluid that has been sitting in the trans cooler now dumps into the transmission, and should stay a little lower as the cooler helps cool things down.

The Fronty, sadly, only locks in 4th and 5th gear, not 3rd (talking about torque converter lockup). When unlocked the torque conv will produce a lot of heat, so when you climb a big hill you're probably in 3rd gear which is not locked and you will see temps rise quite fast. Don't sweat it until you pass 240 degrees trans temp- is what I am told...
Also, 4th gear is the best, it is a 1 to 1 gear ratio so is not having to use gears in the trans to adjust input to output speed - the engine is turning the same rpm as the driveshaft when in 4th. 5th gear is harder on the trans when towing, but thanks to the torque converter you can never really do any damage, it will just unlock before bad things happen.

Select 4th (OD off) to keep the trans from locking and unlocking in 5th. You know it unlocks in 5th or 4th when the rpm jumps up 1,000 or so because between 4th and 5th is only 300-400 rpm difference. Watch the rpm's as you accelerate up to speed and notice the rpm drops so you know these numbers. Keeping the trans locked is very key in towing and making trans last longer. Drive like you have an egg under your foot.
 

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Nice camper, looks just the right size.
You are well under the Frontier 6,xxx lb tow rating, so don't sweat it. You could load it fully and still not have issues. Your tires are what they call unsprung weight, so their weight is not a factor at all in your calculations.

Don't bother with the trans cooler fan or aftermarket anything. The Fronty has an external trans cooler already. It has some sort of valve that opens when the trans fluid gets hot, so the cooler is almost never in use, it is bypassed and the trans fluid just flows through the water radiator (does not mix of course). I think the stock trans cooler kicks in well above 220 degrees, so Nissan thinks these high temps are just fine. Your trans fluid does need to get hot at times to "burn off" contaminates like water or who knows what. Install a trans temp sensor and watch the temps as you tow, you might find that you do not need to do anything. Someone else can chime in exactly what temp the stock trans cooler opens at. As long as you are under that then you are good, or, it probably ok to go over a little because at that point the trans cooler opens and you should see temps drop as that cold trans fluid that has been sitting in the trans cooler now dumps into the transmission, and should stay a little lower as the cooler helps cool things down.

The Fronty, sadly, only locks in 4th and 5th gear, not 3rd (talking about torque converter lockup). When unlocked the torque conv will produce a lot of heat, so when you climb a big hill you're probably in 3rd gear which is not locked and you will see temps rise quite fast. Don't sweat it until you pass 240 degrees trans temp- is what I am told...
Also, 4th gear is the best, it is a 1 to 1 gear ratio so is not having to use gears in the trans to adjust input to output speed - the engine is turning the same rpm as the driveshaft when in 4th. 5th gear is harder on the trans when towing, but thanks to the torque converter you can never really do any damage, it will just unlock before bad things happen.

Select 4th (OD off) to keep the trans from locking and unlocking in 5th. You know it unlocks in 5th or 4th when the rpm jumps up 1,000 or so because between 4th and 5th is only 300-400 rpm difference. Watch the rpm's as you accelerate up to speed and notice the rpm drops so you know these numbers. Keeping the trans locked is very key in towing and making trans last longer. Drive like you have an egg under your foot.

Nice! All the research on weight numbers can really warp your brain! Just want to be safe. Thanks for the advice! I greatly appreciate it!
 

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Yep, you should be fine. My TT is very similar sized and weight. With the WDH set up properly along the brake controller, it tows pretty well. You can tell it's back there, expect 10-11 mpg and keep it under 65mph and you'll be fine. As already noted, maybe grab a scan gauge to monitor trans and coolant temps just for peace of mind.
 

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Yep, you should be fine. My TT is very similar sized and weight. With the WDH set up properly along the brake controller, it tows pretty well. You can tell it's back there, expect 10-11 mpg and keep it under 65mph and you'll be fine. As already noted, maybe grab a scan gauge to monitor trans and coolant temps just for peace of mind.

Thank you 👍 !
 

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Nice trailer! Really you pull that at 75 mph? Ever see the results of a trailer getting squirrelly? They often flip and so does the tow rig.
May all your miles be safe ones.

Clint
 
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Nice trailer! Really you pull that at 75 mph? Ever see the results of a trailer getting squirrelly? They often flip and so does the tow rig.
May all your miles be safe ones.

Clint
I mean you can go 75mph... but you're also getting around 7mpg, maybeeee... The fuel mileage really drops off quick above 57ish. A giant sail 8' wide and 10' tall behind you doesn't help at all. A properly set up WDH with some sort of sway control really helps.

All that being said, tires are the main concern. Super cheap-o trailer tires are rated for 65mph. Most now are rated for 75mph. Some of the "premium" trailer tires (goodyear) are rated for 81-ish mph. Of course those ratings are at max load, blah blah blah, but point is you're cruising around on the cheapest tires the manufacturer could get near their max speed. Tire failures on TT are very common. I ended replacing my CastleRock's with much better quality LT rated tires early this year to help mitigate this concern. Putting LT tires on a trailer is a whole other hornets nest. Just make sure your tires are good whatever you run.
 

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I mean you can go 75mph... but you're also getting around 7mpg, maybeeee... The fuel mileage really drops off quick above 57ish. A giant sail 8' wide and 10' tall behind you doesn't help at all. A properly set up WDH with some sort of sway control really helps.

All that being said, tires are the main concern. Super cheap-o trailer tires are rated for 65mph. Most now are rated for 75mph. Some of the "premium" trailer tires (goodyear) are rated for 81-ish mph. Of course those ratings are at max load, blah blah blah, but point is you're cruising around on the cheapest tires the manufacturer could get near their max speed. Tire failures on TT are very common. I ended replacing my CastleRock's with much better quality LT rated tires early this year to help mitigate this concern. Putting LT tires on a trailer is a whole other hornets nest. Just make sure your tires are good whatever you run.
When you have your family in the vehicle and others sharing the road there are consequences too.
When I tow, I get there when I get there, why the hurry? I stay to the right and let most traffic pass me. Many crashes due to circumstances can become criminally liable instead of just an accident.

Clint
 
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When you have your family in the vehicle and others sharing the road there are consequences too.
When I tow, I get there when I get there, why the hurry? I stay to the right and let most traffic pass me. Many crashes due to circumstances can become criminally liable instead of just an accident.

Clint

Exactly. I can cruise at 62mph in the slow lane all day and not have to worry about passing anyone. Except for the people who insist on merging onto the highway at 45mph...
 

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Nice trailer! Really you pull that at 75 mph? Ever see the results of a trailer getting squirrelly? They often flip and so does the tow rig.
May all your miles be safe ones.

Clint
OH no I don't pull it at 75!! I just happened to get it up to 75 on the way home to see what kind of huevos the truck had pulling something that big. Just me, and the wife the road was clear of traffic. We wanted to see if it would start to get any sway (I had my hand on the trailer brake in case wanted to find that threshold getting to that speed). To my surprise it pulled fine, but I definitely would NEVER tow it that fast! First, and last time 60- 65 tops on this rig !!!
 

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OH no I don't pull it at 75!! I just happened to get it up to 75 on the way home to see what kind of huevos the truck had pulling something that big. I wanted to see were it would start to get any sway (I had my hand on the trailer brake in case). To my surprise it pulled fine, but I definitely wouldn't pull it that fast! First, and last time!!!
I mean you can go 75mph... but you're also getting around 7mpg, maybeeee... The fuel mileage really drops off quick above 57ish. A giant sail 8' wide and 10' tall behind you doesn't help at all. A properly set up WDH with some sort of sway control really helps.

All that being said, tires are the main concern. Super cheap-o trailer tires are rated for 65mph. Most now are rated for 75mph. Some of the "premium" trailer tires (goodyear) are rated for 81-ish mph. Of course those ratings are at max load, blah blah blah, but point is you're cruising around on the cheapest tires the manufacturer could get near their max speed. Tire failures on TT are very common. I ended replacing my CastleRock's with much better quality LT rated tires early this year to help mitigate this concern. Putting LT tires on a trailer is a whole other hornets nest. Just make sure your tires are good whatever you run.

I defiantly won't be going 75 MPH I just wanted to see if it would try to sway to find that threshold. Glad to see it never happened going a slower speed, Even though it has 16' Goodyear Wranglers E rated. I will NEVER tow it that fast. I was really happy with the stability at 60-65. At least I'm happy to know it's not too bad in the recommended speed range. 65 top HWY speed on this rig. Slower when I can.
 
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