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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
After i lifted my truck, i pretty much realised that the jack that i got from factory is pretty much useless to me after my 3 inch lift with my 33's.

I am looking for a High lift jack for my truck but 4 Wheel parts talked me out of it because i do not have a place to put it on the truck to safely jack up the truck in case of a flat.

What do you guys do? What do you guys carry as far as a Jack to replace a tire just in case. Keep a piece or 4x4 wood to pace the jack on top of?

Let me know guys
 

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I do know there are several attachments that can make the hi-lift work. Like wheel attachment jacks and such, but I suppose if you don't have an aftermarket bumper or solid rock sliders on the sides, it would be a bit of a wasted investment. At least for now. As far as lift, yeah a couple short blocks of 4x4 wood is what I use. My 2 3/4 ton floor jack can't even really get the stock pro-4x up off the ground to any respectable height without the wood blocks... They don't exactly sell floor jacks FOR 4x4 specific vehicles either...
 

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...after reading your OP, I feel sort of stupid that this issue never crossed my mind (although I'm still only in the research phase of what lift and suspension I want to do to my SV CC)...
 

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I haven't had a chance to try it out yet but I recently purchased this:

https://safejacks.com/collections/f...ton-bottle-jack-recovery-kit-with-bottle-jack
Unfortunately I cannot find any screw style bottle jacks on the market anymore. I really want one like my original Datsun truck had. Even some Toyota's had them in the 90's and early 2000's. Sadly the only kind of bottle jacks you can find now are the obnoxious and unreliable pump kind. At least those are the two adjectives I use for them, probably great for everyone else.

I do miss being able to just hook the power drill up to the bottle jack and up goes your vehicle.
 

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This is what I use. It is a scissors jack for an H1 Hummer.It comes with a steel base that keeps it from sinking in soft terrain.
Did some modifications so it would be secure under the differential. Also welded a lug nut to it so I can use a portable impact wrench to raise and lower it.
We keep "Hi-lift" jacks in the chase vehicles.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
...after reading your OP, I feel sort of stupid that this issue never crossed my mind (although I'm still only in the research phase of what lift and suspension I want to do to my SV CC)...
i never really cared about that until i really started offroading my truck quite a bit. Had it happen on my last trip with one of my friends in a tacoma and i wanted to make sure i was prepared for it if and when it does happen to me.

Sometimes Triple A or Nissan road side wont come to where you are lol
 

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I haven't had a chance to try it out yet but I recently purchased this:

https://safejacks.com/collections/f...ton-bottle-jack-recovery-kit-with-bottle-jack
I carry a Craftsman 12 ton but don't have any of those nifty accessories. I got's me some pieces of wood though...

This guy is super sexy but that's some serious weight to take on when the scissors, bottle, and hi-lifts do the job just as well (and others)

One of the reasons sliders were one of my first investments (other than fear of pinching a rocker panel) was because I knew I'd be toting a Hi-Lift whether I had lift points or not, since it's so versatile. You can get any of four wheels off the ground with sliders, sometimes two. Bumpers don't always lift as well (I need an attachment for the shackle to lift from my front Shrock)
 

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It is all about where you jack. In the rear you jack on the axle tube. The half inch going from 32" to 33"s make no difference in getting the wheels off the ground.

In the front it looks like you have SPC UCA thus you have about 1" extra of down travel. Still the factory suspension drops considerably when lifted from the frame. Have you tried. How close. You can jack on the front cross member as that is a bit lower and will get you more height. You can also jack directly on the LCA. THis will lift the truck with no suspension drop to worry about.

Using a high lift to change tires is dicey. The best lift point for a high lift is in the 2" receiver of the hitch. Tongue of the lift fits perfectly. I don't like jacking on the sliders as the top of the lift is too close to the body for my taste. I use a lift mate (hooks on to the wheels) for corner lifting but that doesn't help with changing the tires.

IMO the stock jack is still the best for changing tires. Just have to know where to jack from.
 

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^This. Under the axle tube or LCA the factory jack does just fine for tire changes. For off road I just throw a block of wood to help the jack reach if those spots are inaccessible.
 

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All jacks are designed to do one thing. Lift. No jack is designed to hold, at least, not safely. You should NEVER work on a vehicle that isn't properly shored up by jackstands, tires, logs, whatever. A scissor jack will fall over just as easily as a Hi-Lift. I realize on the trail that rule is often broken, but even when it's broken, it's still respected.

I carry 4 jackstands as well as the OEM jack, the bottle jack, and the Hi-Lift. 4 squares of 1/2" plywood as well as the Hi-Lift brand base.
 
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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
^This. Under the axle tube or LCA the factory jack does just fine for tire changes. For off road I just throw a block of wood to help the jack reach if those spots are inaccessible.
It is all about where you jack. In the rear you jack on the axle tube. The half inch going from 32" to 33"s make no difference in getting the wheels off the ground.

In the front it looks like you have SPC UCA thus you have about 1" extra of down travel. Still the factory suspension drops considerably when lifted from the frame. Have you tried. How close. You can jack on the front cross member as that is a bit lower and will get you more height. You can also jack directly on the LCA. THis will lift the truck with no suspension drop to worry about.

Using a high lift to change tires is dicey. The best lift point for a high lift is in the 2" receiver of the hitch. Tongue of the lift fits perfectly. I don't like jacking on the sliders as the top of the lift is too close to the body for my taste. I use a lift mate (hooks on to the wheels) for corner lifting but that doesn't help with changing the tires.

IMO the stock jack is still the best for changing tires. Just have to know where to jack from.
i was not so sure you could jack up our trucks by the axle tube but now that i know i will in case i have too. Not to comfortable lifting my entire truck by the rear receiver hitch with a high lift but i guess if its stable it would not be a problem.
 

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Going from the OEM 32"s to 33"s only added 1/2" between the jacking point and the ground. for on road flat tire changes A good chunk of 1/2" or 3/4" plywood will more than make up the difference. Carrying at least one jack stand is never a bad idea.
 

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Jacks

On the last 3 lifted vehicles I've had I have used this bottle jack. Nice and cheap and if you get one with a screwable top it makes for quick lifting and has quite a lift range.
Torin Big Red Standard Bottle Jack | GEMPLER'S

At home in the garage it's hard to beat the Harbor Freight jacks for the money. I know there are plenty of negative things to say about harbor freight, but when my craftsman jack broke and they wanted to charge me 3/4 the cost of a new jack for a small part I switched to the dark side. I have also seen this jack recommended in off road magazines by the editors.
3 ton Low Profile Steel Heavy Duty Floor Jack with Rapid Pump®

And it never hurts to have some extra wood around just in case.

It's hard to beat a Hi-lift on the trail. I've used mine many times, including winching with it. But know what you're doing before you need it, they are as dangerous as they are useful.
 

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All jacks are designed to do one thing. Lift. No jack is designed to hold, at least, not safely. You should NEVER work on a vehicle that isn't properly shored up by jackstands, tires, logs, whatever. A scissor jack will fall over just as easily as a Hi-Lift. I realize on the trail that rule is often broken, but even when it's broken, it's still respected.

I carry 4 jackstands as well as the OEM jack, the bottle jack, and the Hi-Lift. 4 squares of 1/2" plywood as well as the Hi-Lift brand base.
I've read a dozen owners manuals over the years ( 41 as an adult ), and never seen
even one say jack your vehicle up using the provided jack and then run to Sears and
get some jack stands to properly support your vehicle before you change your tire.

I've got a suspension lift on my truck, I chopped a few 5 1/2" blocks out of a 6x6"
piece of 6x6 lumber to use as a spacer and the OEM jack works fine.

I know that there are some "safety nazi's" out there that preach practices they
never actually follow themselves but... the scissor jack with a spacer is fine for
changing a tire.

Unless the tire is sentient and can jump off the truck, hunt you down, and say
"You didn't use government recommended safety procedures... now I've got to kill
you". >:D
 

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I've read a dozen owners manuals over the years ( 41 as an adult ), and never seen
even one say jack your vehicle up using the provided jack and then run to Sears and
get some jack stands to properly support your vehicle before you change your tire.

I've got a suspension lift on my truck, I chopped a few 5 1/2" blocks out of a 6x6"
piece of 6x6 lumber to use as a spacer and the OEM jack works fine.

I know that there are some "safety nazi's" out there that preach practices they
never actually follow themselves but... the scissor jack with a spacer is fine for
changing a tire.

Unless the tire is sentient and can jump off the truck, hunt you down, and say
"You didn't use government recommended safety procedures... now I've got to kill
you". >:D
Most owner's manuals don't expect you to be using said scissor jack in 1/2" of mud and gravel with a 30° forward pitch and 18° of camber to the right. Do as you see fit but a scissor jack WILL roll on you as soon you quit looking cross-eyed at it.
 

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Instead of the jack kit Jen linked I bought the jack stand set https://safejacks.com/products/12-x-12-compact-jack-stand-kit and a 6 ton jack from Walmart and an extra adjustable tube so that I have the stand to use if we have used the hi-lift or the bottle jack, whichever we could get into a place where it could lift the truck and then be a bit safer while doing the work. Each situation is different and if you have the space and opportunity to have multiple options I think that is the best way to go.
 

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I've read a dozen owners manuals over the years ( 41 as an adult ), and never seen
even one say jack your vehicle up using the provided jack and then run to Sears and
get some jack stands to properly support your vehicle before you change your tire.

I've got a suspension lift on my truck, I chopped a few 5 1/2" blocks out of a 6x6"
piece of 6x6 lumber to use as a spacer and the OEM jack works fine.

I know that there are some "safety nazi's" out there that preach practices they
never actually follow themselves but... the scissor jack with a spacer is fine for
changing a tire.

Unless the tire is sentient and can jump off the truck, hunt you down, and say
"You didn't use government recommended safety procedures... now I've got to kill
you". >:D
I thought mine was going to, but then it settled down.
 
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