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I'm doing a timing belt replacement job and I'm replacing everything that should be replaced. I'm kinda nervous about breaking the bolts loose on the camshaft sprockets in fear of moving the shafts. Anyone know of a way to lock them in place? Also considering replacing the oil pump since I've got it all broke down, is it necessary? any advice would be much appreciated.
1999 Frontier 4x4 V6 203,000 miles all original
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Disclaimer: I have not done a timing belt except on my Mazda truck.

Can't you make a paint stick or Sharpie line on the sprockets and the part behind it and line up to that?

I think on some vehicles you can stick a socket and extension through a hole in the sprocket to lock it as you loosen the bolt.
 

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I wouldn't bother with the oil pump if your oil pressure is good. It'll add a lot more work to the job as the oil pan will need to be removed. As far as the sprockets moving, it's not a big deal if they do. Your new timing belt will have lines painted on it to match up to the timing marks on the sprockets and an arrow to let you know what direction the belt goes on. The arrow usually sits in the span between the two cam sprockets and points toward the front of the vehicle. There should be one "dashed" line and two solid lines. The dashed line lines up with the timing mark on the right bank, or passenger side, cam sprocket. The solid lines will line up with the timing marks on the left bank cam sprocket and crank sprocket, respectively. The timing mark on the crank sprocket will be in the 5:00 position. The right cam sprocket mark will be at 11:00 and the left at 1:00. There are mating marks on the rear timing cover, but they are typically a tooth off, so don't pay no mind to them. Just be concerned with lining up the sprocket timing marks to the lines on the new timing belt.
When it comes to tensioning the belt, loosen the nut on the tensioner pulley after installing the belt and let it take up the slack. Turn the right bank cam sprocket about two or three teeth counter-clockwise so it will pull the remaining slack out of the belt. Torque the tensioner nut to 35 ft/lbs. Turn the right cam sprocket two to three teeth clockwise. Use your thumb and forefinger to twist the timing belt at the center of the span between the camshaft sprockets. You should be able to twist the belt 90 degrees if it's properly adjusted. If you can't twist 90 degrees, the belt is too tight and could make a "whining" noise when you get done and start the engine. If you can twist it more than 90 degrees, it is adjusted too loose.
 
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