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Discussion Starter #1
My 2000 V6 has about 85k miles. By the time I reach 105k miles, the truck will probably be 12-13 years old.

Is it recommended that I change the timing belt earlier than the 105k mile spec based on the age of the truck?
 

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i had a buddy just do his belt and his truck is an 04 , the belt was starting to crack in a few places thats only 6 years old

so yes i would look at replacing it before the 105k

i plan on doin mine very soon , i have an 02 with 73k
 

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Time is just as important as mileage. If it is at the recommended time before the mileage change it. Just like oil changes, time is as important.
 

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Probably not a bad idea to do it sooner rather than later as Mathster stated.

Cheap insurance...
I changed my 01 when it had 135xxx
It actually looked ok but every truck is different.
 

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Thanks for all the great advice. It does make sense to err on the side of caution. Here's an excerpt from a highly-respected independent garage near where I live.

"According to Nissan, the timing belt depends on both miles and age .... whichever comes first.

I made a call to Nissan Corp. to find out how many years until timing belt needs to be changed but to my surprise they did not know that information and told me to call a dealership.

According to OC Nissan, the age on when the timing belt needs to be replaced is 7 years.
I usually don't believe what the dealerships says and usually go with Nissan corporation (car manual) but since we have no choice, I would have to go with the dealership.

I know that oil changes are 3750 miles or 3 month. So if you calculate that, 105K miles would be 7 years.

I usually tell my customers what Nissan corporation says is good to follow if you want to be safe. On my own car, if I go over the time by a few years, I don't worry about it but 12-13 years may be pushing it. Hard to predict, some timing belts last little over 7 years and I know a couple cars that have lasted 200,000 miles and 20 years. Not worth the risk."
 

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According to the Gates brand, based on time replacement would be 5 years on their belts. Based on driving averages I'd say 6-7 years @15,000 miles per year.
There is too much potential costly damage by waiting too long.

Clint
 

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I know this is a really old thread, but the answer IS:

The manual says 105K miles OR 105 months, whichever comes first.

(105 months / 12 months per year = 8.75 years)

I'm just about to do mine, in the next week or three. I'm a 2004, with just about 100K miles, so I'm WAY over on time, not including the time from manufacture til I bought it (didn't check).

I'll try to remember to take a pic of the belt condition, if anyone responds to this and is interested...
 

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Yup, 2001 with about 230,000 km on it (which is about 140k miles)...

I bought the truck a few months ago, and the previous owner didn't know much about these trucks so he didn't know if the timing belt had been changed or not which obviously concerned me. I was lucky though, because it looks like a mechanic changed the timing belt at 140,000 km (around 87k miles) and etched the words "timing belt" and the odometer reading on the front cover of the engine that protects the drive belts. Cool!
 

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I bought my 2003 with 88K on it and after a 1000 mile drive home the timing belt made noise almost like legos rattling in a plastic jug sound. changed it the next day. The belt itself looked ok but the tensioners looked like ****. Water pump looked good too.
 

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Mine runs and sounds fine and no leaks, etc. Original everything under there, including drive belts - never even adjusted them. Just doing because overdue on time and I'm getting a little nervous. Doing everything: Timing and drive belts, water pump, thermostat, all hoses, seals, radiator cap, tensioner and spring. Replacing plugs, since they're out for this job anyway, but not wires and cap/rotor - will do later if needed - spent too much money already. (Prestone 50/50 $14 a gallon - WTF???)
 

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These are interference engines, and one cannot assess remaining lifetime on a timing belt by looking.

My Mazda truck has a timing belt but is a non-interference engine, and at 60K timing belt changes each time the belt looked perfect. I have 201K on that now, last timing belt change was at 178K, so doubt that I'll be changing that ever again unless I need a tensioner or something, since I rarely take that out of town, and have AAA to get it home if that belt snaps, but shouldn't have other damage. You wouldn't be as lucky in the 6-cylinder Frontiers !!!
 

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You can assess AFTER replacing whether the belt was still healthy when it was changed. You do this by turning the belt inside-out and inspecting closely with good lighting and perhaps magnification, for minute cracking, particularly at the tooth roots. (Of course, you should never do this, or even bend the correct way, smaller than the crank pulley diameter, any belt you plan to use/re-use.)

Again, I'll post pics after removal, inside-out per the above.

For what it's worth, every belt I've ever done, even way overdue, has come off looking very good, with no notable cracking. This in no way means that I advocate being remiss, however!!

Interestingly, I had a couple of old Subaru's, years ago and they had inspection ports to look at the belt, but you could only see the drivers-side camshaft pulley and maybe 4 inches on either side, so it's benefit was questionable. Nevertheless, you could see the gross condition (not frayed, no chunks missing, etc.) and so it was SOMEWHAT helpful. If you've never changed a Subaru timing belt, you haven't lived. Some have 4 cams and they have a tensioner, it goes around the water pump and then there are TWO idler pulleys. You have to be very creative to hold everything in place while you put the belt on, for sure - lol. In any event, ALL Subaru's leak oil freakin everywhere and so there's always oil inside the belt cover and yet I've not seen one even close to failure...

Anyway - too much caffeine today and WAY too many words - lol
 

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Changed the belt in my 2000 just this year. Was made in Jan of '00. Belts looked a bit cracked but nothing major. Truck only had 70k on it but i didnt want to be a horror story so I changed it. They should put a time limit on it as well but I guess that all depends on climate and driving conditions. Don't be cheap about the timing belt. Just pay to get it fixed and forget about it for another 100k. 14 -15 yrs is freaking old! Change It!
 

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Changed belt yesterday. And water pump, hoses, thermostat, can seals, belts, etc. Ended up taking almost 10 hours, as crank pulley would NOT play nice... Bolt came right out, pulley not so much. And it took forever to clean the gasket surface for water pump...

Anyway, belt ended up looking practically new. No tiny cracks, etc. Looked good for a lot longer. Tensioner sounded slightly roller-skate-wheelish, though. Water pump still good.

One thing, though: When I started it, there's a whine just between 1000-1200 rpm. The timing belt is too tight, which is making that noise. I used the adjustment procedure and I have a calibrated (from work...) push/pull gauge, so I wasn't just guessing it was tensioned correctly - it was. Between 0.51 and 0.59 inches of deflection at 22 lbf.

I read online a few places that this is common and goes away with a few miles, as the belt stretches. Local dealer says common, too.

Anybody else have this experience??
 
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