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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
SPC vs TC arms

Any real reason to spend the extra money on the TC arms? seems the SPC will allow more adjustment and avoid the CBC I can only guess the TC are for some serious wheeling right?
 

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I got the SPC arms because the come with ball joints, adjustable ball joints. I didn't want the wear and or noise that can be associated with the balls. My shop said it was the easiest alignment he's ever done.
 

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If you decide to go with the TC arms, do not get the clones. There is a reason this kit exists.
PRG Products

And if you want the TC style, but do not live in the rust belt, I would go with these as then they can adjust much more.
PRG Products
 

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Discussion Starter #4
If you decide to go with the TC arms, do not get the clones. There is a reason this kit exists.
PRG Products

And if you want the TC style, but do not live in the rust belt, I would go with these as then they can adjust much more.
PRG Products
What about the spc arms? I'm not doing anything extream but would like to have the no coilbuckt contact

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SPC will perform as close to factory as possible while still avoiding CB contact. They will also align much easier than anything else out there.

The only reason to go with anything else is for the "race car" look. The uniball arms are a little stronger than those with ball joints by design but the uniballs and heim joints will wear out MUCH faster than the bushings and ball joint in the SPCs and be more expensive to replace.

SPC has my vote.
 

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http://www.carparts.com/details/Nissan/Frontier/Replacement/Control_Arm_Kit/2010/PRO-4X/6_Cyl_4-dot-0L/SET-REPL281517.html

Found these they seem to be a better design than the stocks, however I dunno if these will eliminate the CBC
Those are interesting looking. Slim and might miss the CB.


For starters do you understand what CBC really is.
If you remove your shock and spring, you can push your suspension (front)and move the wheel up and down (cycle). Because you can do this is why your coil spring over shock is NOT a strut, but that is a discussion for another time. The limits of your suspension travel is constrained by bump stops. The up travel bump stop is on the lower control arm. The down travel bump stop is located inside the shock. This a a relatively new way of doing it. Traditionally in a stock vehicle this bump stop is located on the upper control arm. With the shock removed the down travel is constrained now by the UCA striking the coil bucket. CBC is not necessarily bad, as it means that you are ekking out more suspension travel then stock. In fact if you add a bump stop to the upper control arm then you have essentially created a factory like set up. Except for the fact that the angle which the UCA bump strikes the CB. It is not square and tears through bump stops easily.

The TC id designed to give more negative camber, positive caster, and more drop before CBC. A UCA bump stop is also added to accommodate the drop travel limit. Being a traditionalist I like this. The TC clones are not bad. In fact from what I know about them they are an exact copy. THe only issue is that they use cheap hardware. The arms them selves are solid. Buy the ebay TC clones for $300 and then replacing the hardware with the PRG ($150) kit will still be cheaper than the TC arms at $750. I would have gone this route except that I found some used TC arms for about what I would have paid for the upgraded clones. There is the issue with the unsealed uniball, but unless you go for the SPC arms you have to deal with it. I am trying to boot mine to protect the balls from the elements.

Why do I like having a drop limited hard stop. Again this is from being old. But back in the day it was fairly common to destroy shock by topping it out or over extending it. Shocks were not built with an internal top out bump stop. If you caught air and dropped out your suspension to its max, and something was not quite right with your set up (bump stop missing for example) you could rip the shock shaft right out of the body. Did this at least once. Today it is less common but it still happens. Our esteemed moderator JrNV did this on a Bilstein 5100 with some over sprung OME springs when she first titan swapped. THe under rebound dampened shock coupled with the increased spring rate and repeated impact on the top out bumper from ripping trails was too much and the shock shaft let go.

In most cases I think that the SPC arm is the best way to go. Adjustable, bushings, and sealed ball joints are a big + in a DD street driven rig. But the lack of drop travel limit had me go with the TC arms.
 
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