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I leave my tailgate open when hauling wood. See to many other Frontiers with the tailgate plastic top cap missing or destroyed.
Same here. I always lay long materials flat. I see folks in other pickups lean the material on the tailgate. I think it's better to lay the material flat on the bed. The tailgate being down gives an extra 18" of length to support long materials. And the weight of the material is spread evenly throughout the bed floor, as opposed to the tailgate bearing the majority of the weight in a concentrated area.

Some may point out that the material leaning on the tailgate is less likely to slide around or out of the bed. That may be true, but bundling and securing material as I mentioned earlier prevents that. The material was likely shipped to the store on a flatbed truck and secured with the same method. Having the Utili-trac with the rails in the floor helps tremendously.
 
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Same here. I always lay long materials flat. I see folks in other pickups lean the material on the tailgate. I think it's better to lay the material flat on the bed. The tailgate being down gives an extra 18" of length to support long materials. And the weight of the material is spread evenly throughout the bed floor, as opposed to the tailgate bearing the majority of the weight in a concentrated area.

Some may point out that the material leaning on the tailgate is less likely to slide around or out of the bed. That may be true, but bundling and securing material as I mentioned earlier prevents that. The material was likely shipped to the store on a flatbed truck and secured with the same method. Having the Utili-trac with the rails in the floor helps tremendously.
On my various Hardbody trucks the only factory tiedowns were up at the top corners. I'd installed additional tiedowns in the form of automotive door striker plates (those plates with d-shaped rings on the frame that the latch engages into) because they're strong and readily available at junkyards. The D40's tiedown points are better than the factory ones on the Hardbody, but still not quite low enough in the bed. I suppose one of these days I really should get more of the striker plates and install them, along with finishing up my utilitrak install.
 

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The D40's tiedown points are better than the factory ones on the Hardbody, but still not quite low enough in the bed.
I agree. In lieu of Utili-trac, pickup trucks really need fold-flat tie downs in the corners of the bed floor, like most SUVs have. Can't tie down materials if your straps string across the bed like clotheslines.

Even late-model pickups like the F-150 with its BoxLink system and the Silverado have near bed-rail-height tie-downs.
 

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It's real to me too....I pamper mine like it is a Ferrari...lol...I go kayaking with my wife and looked for everything known to man to not scratch the tailgate protector...was ready to try pool noodles but...tried leaving my tailgate down and flip extender all the way out... works great...no scratches... don't even need to strap it down....All those sleepless nights for nothing 🙄
 

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racheting straps
Word of advice on ratchet straps. Either get a set of those supersize rubber coated twist ties or a piece of string/rope and then roll in a large loop the tail of the strap, then secure it to itself. Or, rolled in a large loop, open the ratchet part on the handle and lift it up, and push the rolled up tail inside it then close the handle over it. That way it's neatly and securely dealt with. Looks crappy with a long tail of strap wadded up and wrapped around something or loose and flopping around or hanging down on the road.
 

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Word of advice on ratchet straps. Either get a set of those supersize rubber coated twist ties or a piece of string/rope and then roll in a large loop the tail of the strap, then secure it to itself. Or, rolled in a large loop, open the ratchet part on the handle and lift it up, and push the rolled up tail inside it then close the handle over it. That way it's neatly and securely dealt with. Looks crappy with a long tail of strap wadded up and wrapped around something or loose and flopping around or hanging down on the road.
Electrical tape,,,,,
 

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When carrying lumber, I open the tail gate, flip the bed extender out. Three 2x4s (two horizontal one vertical) fit snugly in the smaller 4 1/4" x 4 3/4" sections of the bed extender, and the larger sections also can help lumber sliding side to side. When carrying 250 6" wide x 8' fence pickets, I realized it would be beneficial to have lower tie-down points.
So I installed SS D-rings, down low in each corner of the bed, to get a lower tie-down points. I have a Spidy Gear cargo bed bungee net for loose stuff, that works much better with a lower attach point as well.
Between those and the Uni-track tie-downs, so far I have it covered pretty well.
 
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