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A friend of mine has a 2002 Frontier, and I have a 2000 Frontier- both with the KA24DE 4 cylinder with a 5 speed. My friend's truck is on it's third slave cylinder - the first one (Duralast) lasted 9 months, the second was a Dorman off of Amazon (I purchased this one for my truck in case of failure, but used it for this repair) and lasted less than 3 months, and the third was (again) a Duralast that was the replacement for the first Duralast (had a lifetime warranty and they exchanged it-no questions asked). The original Nissan slave had a small leak but never failed catastrophically, and was replaced at home. The second and third failures left my friend stranded in places that were not ideal places to be stranded, and in the wee hrs of the night. Both the Duralast and Dorman parts failed in exactly the same way and completely drained the system. The brake fluid within the boots of both failed parts was black, and this was brand-new fluid at the time of installation, since the entire system was bled using the service manual method and using fresh DOT-3 brake fluid. Obviously, these Chinese-made parts do not contain the grade of rubber that can withstand brake fluid - even the lifetime guaranteed one. My friend doesn't want to leave this slave cylinder on his truck and wants it replaced with one that will last. Can anyone recommend a brand that will hold up for years, rather than only a few months? Exedy was mentioned in another thread but we are inclined to go with the OEM Nissan slave cylinder. Since $$ is tight for us both due to COVID, we are wondering what brands of clutch hydraulics have been used by other Frontier owners. RockAuto.com has around 8 different brands (slave) with warranties ranging from 3 months to 24 months. It's disappointing that there are so many critical auto parts of Chinese origin that are floating around, and it seems to be getting more difficult to weed through the choices. Having a lifetime replacement warranty is no guarantee of a quality part, at least with this specific part. This was not the case 30 years ago. Any recs would be sincerely appreciated, since I couldn't find an OEM kit to replace the rubber components, like we used to do with calipers and wheel cylinders.
 

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Guess what: Nissan doesn't make slave cylinders, etc. They buy them.
Get Exedy from RockAuto.com, it's OEM 1998 NISSAN FRONTIER 2.4L L4 Clutch Slave Cylinder | RockAuto
I knew it wouldn't take long to get answers on this forum. Cusser, you just confirmed what I was told about Exedy's slave cylinder on Rockauto.com. I've also located the rebuild lit for $15 and change at the Nissan site. I still have my wheel cylinder hone and I'm used to tearing these devices down like the calipers and wheel cylinders and just installing the kit rather than changing out the entire part. The kits aren't as easy to locate, but Google pulled through. My local Nissan dealership's parts guy feels he must inform me every visit of my truck being a year 2000 model, and that most parts have been discontinued and that the truck is obsolete and they don't service them anymore. Well, as long as it's running like a champ with cold air, it's not obsolete to me. I want to thank y'all for taking the time to respond. Have a safe 4th!!
 

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Why not change the o-rings and gaskets with parts from a Nissan overhaul kit
I found the kit on parts.nissan.com for a little over $15. Plan on rebuilding Darians failed Dorman slave and swap it over before the Duralast part fails- then put a kit in my OEM before it fails. Thanks for your response and have a happy 4th!
 

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My local Nissan dealership's parts guy feels he must inform me every visit of my truck being a year 2000 model, and that most parts have been discontinued and that the truck is obsolete and they don't service them anymore.
I have a 1988 Mazda truck, a 1971 VW convertible, and a 1970 VW sedan, as well as my 1998 and 2004 Frontiers. I haven't yet found a situation where I could not purchase a part new. I'm not planning on ditching any of those either.

When the high pressure AC line on my '98 Frontier developed a pinhole on a 119F day in 2018 (I later discovered my fan clutch was bad), only replacement was aftermarket (discontinued by Nissan), made in China, but got that to work. My other "fix" would've been to have a custom made hose made.
 

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When I purchase from Rock, I typically go with product marked with a red heart, for favorite choice.
 
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When I purchase from Rock, I typically go with product marked with a red heart, for favorite choice.
I had an '88 B-2200 that I purchased in 1991 for $7000. Only options were AC - no PS and a 5 speed. Never had any issues with the truck. Replaced the timing belt at !10K and later had a custom front bumper made to fit a towing A-frame so the truck could be towed behind a motor home (motor home a BIG mistake, but got heavy experience in electrical diagnostics and the Chevy P-20 chassis). Never had a clutch hydraulic failure or any other failure except the AC (at 171K). Later sold the truck with an appropriate "discount" because it was to be a work truck and the guy was cold-natured.

I find the way Nissan "writes off" their vehicles as obsolete, along with the verbal "we don't support this vehicle" somewhat distasteful, since there exists other options including aftermarket choices. The service department at this local dealership in BR is quick to refuse to service a unit if > 10 years old and I'm just puzzled by this. I do work on the side and am all too familiar with components fashioned from plastic becoming brittle and breaking in my hands. I just make sure the owner is aware of this fact and that there is no other workaround when taking things apart that have been together for 15-20 years, and through all of the heat/cold cycles thousands of times. Yes, it adds time to a job to do these little "nickel and dime" fixes, but I have a few Nissan electrical connectors and other Nissan specific parts (air box components, Positive terminals/fuse modules for battery connections, etc.) that I harvested from my local LQK (or is it LKQ?) The positive terminals of early 2000's/late 90's Nissans leave much to be desired. I am happy that the timing components of the KA24DE are available from Nissan, but the price varies, even between dealers. One annoying problem with my 2000 Frontier revolves around the tensioners and guide rails of the primary timing chain. I know Nissan has an "improved" tensioner but don't think they've added a mechanism to just maintain the chain tension when the engine is off. There is a gentleman on youtube that has a business that makes improved versions of both tensioners that includes a ratcheting mechanism internally. It seems that the cold rattle on startup will begin to eat at the plastic guide rails of the lower chain and the chain becomes more slack as time goes by.......Until a critical point is reached when the plunger to the primary tensioner pops out of it's hole due to slack. The few I've taken apart reflect this possibly being the events, and all had valve damage or worse. The tensioner plunger and spring are usually in the oil pan, along with the plastic pieces from the guides. My truck doesn't have a start-up rattle until the oil is due to be changed, and it's usually a second or two and disappears. I pulled my valve cover and looked down the front chain area with a borescope and the guides are still in one piece. but have grooves. I plan to swap out the tensioners and guides (at a minimum) soon, and the chain if its stretched. The chains I've seen have very minimal stretch (if at all) in an engine where the oil changes were done religiously, and the neglected chains had excessive stretch and excessive lateral movement - almost ready to break. The cheap Chinese timing chain kits have a chain that weighs less than half of what a Nissan chain weighs, and both times I've seen these cheap chains used, they failed - one after a few months and one after a year or two.
 
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