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Discussion Starter #1
Looking to remove the Pro-4X decals from either rear fender.

After reading through various threads it seems as though a little heat from a hair dryer etc. helps loosen things up, then just pick and peel.

Clean up with Goo-gone, WD-40 or similar.

Anything else to keep in mind?
 

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Heat helps, if they been on for a while. I pulled mine off about a week after I got the truck, hot day, came off in seconds in a shopping center parking lot, didn't even need goo gone.
 
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Depending on how old the truck is and how much the paint has faded since new, you may still see where the decal was after it's gone.
 

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Acetone is pretty effective for getting rid of any residue.
I wouldn't use acetone on my paint, if it will dissolve nail polish I'd think it would damage the paint as well.

Clint
 

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Nail polish is acrylic enamel and dries by evaporation of solvents. Modern day vehicles are painted with Urethane which dries by chemical process. In theory, the Urethane is less affected by chemicals. But, YMMV and ALWAYS try in an inconspicuous area before using any new solvent.
 

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I wouldn't use acetone either, but I have used it on car paint before and had no problems. A guy I know was spraying some shutters and got overspray on his mother-in-law's car(1980's Buick). As you can imagine, he was freaking out and wanted to take care of it before she saw it. The guy at the auto finishing supply store sold him some acetone to clean all the new paint off the old paint. I thought it would dissolve the old paint, but it didn't seem to touch it. Once it was clean he gave it a good waxing and that was the end of the story.
I still wouldn't use it on my own vehicle, though.
 

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I wouldn't use acetone either, but I have used it on car paint before and had no problems. A guy I know was spraying some shutters and got overspray on his mother-in-law's car(1980's Buick). As you can imagine, he was freaking out and wanted to take care of it before she saw it. The guy at the auto finishing supply store sold him some acetone to clean all the new paint off the old paint. I thought it would dissolve the old paint, but it didn't seem to touch it. Once it was clean he gave it a good waxing and that was the end of the story.
I still wouldn't use it on my own vehicle, though.


Newer paints don't hold up anywhere near as well against acetone.

Source: Removed paint accidentally with acetone.
 

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When I sprayed Rhino Liner many moons ago, we would bust down the clear coat in a truck bed with a DA sander, then come through and wipe it out with heavy doses of acetone. The acetone would "float" the clear coat dust off, and at the same time, soften the paint beneath for a short time. In this short time we would shoot the Rhino and it would bond with the paint more readily.



Short form: don't use acetone.
 

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Discussion Starter #15




Much cleaner IMO.

Thanks for the great tips, about 30 seconds going over it with a hair dryer and they peeled right off. Truck didn't get too hot, very little residue. A little Goo-Gone and then a rinse and all seems well.

Truck is a 16 that just turned 500 miles so they weren't on there too long.
 

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Much cleaner IMO.

Thanks for the great tips, about 30 seconds going over it with a hair dryer and they peeled right off. Truck didn't get too hot, very little residue. A little Goo-Gone and then a rinse and all seems well.

Truck is a 16 that just turned 500 miles so they weren't on there too long.
500 miles? You might want to consider trading it in as you're wearing it out, lol.
Enjoy that beautiful truck.

Clint
 

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