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Discussion Starter · #1,061 ·
Hey Raine, an idea you can copy off of me since I am copying some off you. :)
I used these Anderson Plugs with 6 gauge wire and 40 amp fuse so I don't have to open my hood every time I want to use the compressor. Also I used 1/4" poly line with QC connectors to fill 2 tires at a time. If I blow a line then I can easily covert it to a single line.

I thought of running a power line to put an Anderson in the rear but found it easier and safer to run an air line to a QC plug. I may even put one near each wheel well.
View attachment 330041
I thought about an external plug so I don't have to open the hood, but it doesn't bother me right now. Maybe one day I'll get sick of it and decide that is the time to do another mod.
 

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If only I had utilitrac. I've seen a few short beds on cl with and thought about getting them and swapping out... But it seems like more work than I'd be interested in. If I ever paint the whole truck in bedliner I'll maybe do it. Do you know if the diy tracks people talk about in the forums are compatible with oem items such as this and the extender?
If you use UtiliStrut from Lowes, yes, it is. Here's what I did.

 
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Discussion Starter · #1,063 ·
Sort-of Normal: First Trail Run in 2021 (02.27.2021)
Almost 5 years ago to the day (give or take about a week) it was time for my daily driver Frontier to see some proper dirt again. With the pandemic messing everything up for the past year (and ongoing), it was nice to take a day away to just enjoy some nature and a drive. That morning I loaded up the gear and met a few friends at the Summit Staging Area on 3N22 in Hesperia, CA. From there we aired-down (first time for me on the new Falken’s) and headed to 2N47, that familiar dirt trail known as Cleghorn Ridge. The weather was dry and slightly windy, and a nice day to head out for the first a trail run for 2021.

Unfortunately, one of the 4 vehicles in the group bailed out when we reached the first heavily-rutted area (it was a… stock 2WD Sequioa, so yeah…). Most of the trail was bumpy, and we did encounter more than a handful of technical sections that required some slow and easy spotted maneuvers – but for the most part everything went just fine. I was really happy with the performance of the Falken tires, they actually felt nice and comfy on the bumpy areas and washboard sections of the trail, and I never spun the wheels the entire route. It was a nice day and we got to the end of the trail just as the sun was setting. Here’s some pics:

At the staging area, about to air down for some dirt driving.


New shoes, aired down and ready to go.

Dodging some ruts.


Photo from my friend following… full flex on the left-rear.

Can’t dodge all of the ruts (!)

End of the trail, Falken's aired back up and ready to head home. It was a good day =)

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This can also be seen at project:KEIRA
 

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Looks like a damn fine time! Can't wait to get back out on the trails here, gotta wait for some snow to melt first.

Also, those wheels look spectacular. Good choice.
 

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Not sure if I missed it in this thread or on your site but, is your truck ceramic coated?
How the hell are you out in the dust all day and can use your door as a mirror for shaving :ROFLMAO:
 

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Discussion Starter · #1,066 ·
Looks like a damn fine time! Can't wait to get back out on the trails here, gotta wait for some snow to melt first.

Also, those wheels look spectacular. Good choice.
Wheels still doing well after 6 years!

Not sure if I missed it in this thread or on your site but, is your truck ceramic coated?
How the hell are you out in the dust all day and can use your door as a mirror for shaving :ROFLMAO:
No ceramic coat.
I normally clay and hand wax once a year, but I've been lagging lately. The last time I did the full clay/wax was in late 2019. Up close, it's not as 'crystal' as the photos make it look.
 

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Discussion Starter · #1,067 ·
Put My Foot Down (03.17.2021)
After what, almost 7 years of driving around in my Frontier (and my recent Cleghorn trail run), I finally decided to get some all-weather floor mats. Like most people, the first brand I looked at was Weathertech. However I was soon crossing them off the list, because of one major, major flaw in their design: I discovered from other owners that the Weathertech mats only covered less than 30% of the driver’s side dead pedal/foot rest… considering these are supposed to be all-weather mats, what is the point?!?! I use the foot rest every time I drive, and if it’s a trail day and my shoes have sand, dirt, or mud on the bottom, the last thing I want is a floor mat that will let whatever is under the front part of my shoes to seep down behind the floor mat and ultimately into the carpet underneath the floor mat itself!

So with Weathertech not an option, I started looking at other brands and when I read from other owners that the MaxLiner/SmartLiner all-weather floor mats for the Frontier covered the whole foot rest, I decided I’d try them. Although I only wanted to get the front pair, I ended up buying the full front/rear set since it only cost an extra $20 for all three pieces. Thanks to “Amy” (you know, Amazon) a large brown box arrived 2 days later:


Out of the box, the floor mats are pretty thick but flexible, and the textured surface is much grippier than it looks:




Installation was simple – remove OEM carpet floor mats, and fit the new MaxLiner ones. The floor mats had provisions for the OEM floor mat retaining tabs, but the cutouts were on the small side, making it difficult to get the tabs to “grab” correctly. The solution for this was simple: I used an Xacto knife to enlarge the floor hook openings to get the retaining tabs to fit; to be honest, I don’t think this is a big deal at all, and only took a few seconds on each side (driver’s and passengers). With this done, the front mats were secured in place as intended:


Let’s get the question asked earlier out of the way: do the MaxLiner/SmartLiner floor mats completely cover the foot rest? Turns out that they also don’t completely cover 100%… but they do cover about 80% which is still way more than the more expensive Weathertechs. The top edge of the mat in this area does sit fairly high above the surface of the OEM foot rest/dead pedal, and some quick testing (walk on some dirt in the backyard, then sit in my truck LOL) showed that the coverage seemed to be more than enough to help keep any shoe crud away from the carpet:


So dead pedal details aside, I will say this: the MaxLiner/SmartLiner floor mats fit really, really good! The driver’s side mat followed the shaping of the left side trim and transmission tunnel carpet perfectly. The rear portion of the mat was shaped to match the raised contours of the floor carpet, and the rear edge wrapped around the seat leg plastic trim perfectly as well:


The same goes for the front passenger side mat fitment:




Another detail I liked – the portion of the floor mats that overlapped the door sill was also molded to match the contours of the OEM panel, so there’s no weird air gaps underneath. Very snug, very precise shaping, as good as what I’ve seen from Weathertechs (in other vehicles). I did not test the rear one-piece mat because I didn’t intend to use it daily like the fronts, so I have no feedback on the rear. I do know that due to the rear floor of the Frontier tapering downward at the side edges, the floor mat edges aren’t as perfectly formed as the fronts, but again – I don’t really plan on using them.
So far I am very happy with my choice. For the price of just front Weathertechs, I purchased a complete 3-piece set (two front, one rear) of MaxLiner/SmartLiner mats. The materials feel sturdy, and fitment as shown above is exceptional. They also have good surface grip (they look slippery but I’m surprised at how grippy they really are) and all in all, a good value. If you’re in the market for some all-weather mats, give the MaxLiner/SmartLiner brand a try!

----------------------------------------------------------------
This can also be seen at project:KEIRA
 

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Hate to be the guy that gets scolded by you, but, I can’t figure out looking through your site what and where you got your sub box. I see posts about the kickers and switching to jl, box is in the background but no mention of it really. Is it a prefab, if so can you disclose the brand and model? Is it custom built?

thanks
 

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Put My Foot Down (03.17.2021)
After what, almost 7 years of driving around in my Frontier (and my recent Cleghorn trail run), I finally decided to get some all-weather floor mats. Like most people, the first brand I looked at was Weathertech. However I was soon crossing them off the list, because of one major, major flaw in their design: I discovered from other owners that the Weathertech mats only covered less than 30% of the driver’s side dead pedal/foot rest… considering these are supposed to be all-weather mats, what is the point?!?! I use the foot rest every time I drive, and if it’s a trail day and my shoes have sand, dirt, or mud on the bottom, the last thing I want is a floor mat that will let whatever is under the front part of my shoes to seep down behind the floor mat and ultimately into the carpet underneath the floor mat itself!

So with Weathertech not an option, I started looking at other brands and when I read from other owners that the MaxLiner/SmartLiner all-weather floor mats for the Frontier covered the whole foot rest, I decided I’d try them. Although I only wanted to get the front pair, I ended up buying the full front/rear set since it only cost an extra $20 for all three pieces. Thanks to “Amy” (you know, Amazon) a large brown box arrived 2 days later:


Out of the box, the floor mats are pretty thick but flexible, and the textured surface is much grippier than it looks:




Installation was simple – remove OEM carpet floor mats, and fit the new MaxLiner ones. The floor mats had provisions for the OEM floor mat retaining tabs, but the cutouts were on the small side, making it difficult to get the tabs to “grab” correctly. The solution for this was simple: I used an Xacto knife to enlarge the floor hook openings to get the retaining tabs to fit; to be honest, I don’t think this is a big deal at all, and only took a few seconds on each side (driver’s and passengers). With this done, the front mats were secured in place as intended:


Let’s get the question asked earlier out of the way: do the MaxLiner/SmartLiner floor mats completely cover the foot rest? Turns out that they also don’t completely cover 100%… but they do cover about 80% which is still way more than the more expensive Weathertechs. The top edge of the mat in this area does sit fairly high above the surface of the OEM foot rest/dead pedal, and some quick testing (walk on some dirt in the backyard, then sit in my truck LOL) showed that the coverage seemed to be more than enough to help keep any shoe crud away from the carpet:


So dead pedal details aside, I will say this: the MaxLiner/SmartLiner floor mats fit really, really good! The driver’s side mat followed the shaping of the left side trim and transmission tunnel carpet perfectly. The rear portion of the mat was shaped to match the raised contours of the floor carpet, and the rear edge wrapped around the seat leg plastic trim perfectly as well:


The same goes for the front passenger side mat fitment:




Another detail I liked – the portion of the floor mats that overlapped the door sill was also molded to match the contours of the OEM panel, so there’s no weird air gaps underneath. Very snug, very precise shaping, as good as what I’ve seen from Weathertechs (in other vehicles). I did not test the rear one-piece mat because I didn’t intend to use it daily like the fronts, so I have no feedback on the rear. I do know that due to the rear floor of the Frontier tapering downward at the side edges, the floor mat edges aren’t as perfectly formed as the fronts, but again – I don’t really plan on using them.
So far I am very happy with my choice. For the price of just front Weathertechs, I purchased a complete 3-piece set (two front, one rear) of MaxLiner/SmartLiner mats. The materials feel sturdy, and fitment as shown above is exceptional. They also have good surface grip (they look slippery but I’m surprised at how grippy they really are) and all in all, a good value. If you’re in the market for some all-weather mats, give the MaxLiner/SmartLiner brand a try!

----------------------------------------------------------------
This can also be seen at project:KEIRA
Those look great, those looks better than the weather techs. The dead pedal is something I never even thought about.
 

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How-To: Trailer Plug Relocation (11.05.14)

I never liked how the OEM trailer plug was on a bracket protruding down from the receiver, it literally looked tacked on! So I decided to relocate it.

TOOLS/PARTS USED
  1. Power Drill
  2. 2-1/4” (57mm) Hole Saw Bit
  3. 7/16” Drill Bit for Metal
  4. Dremel Multi-Tool with Grinding Bit
  5. Socket Wrench, 10mm
  6. Combination wrench, 10mm
  7. Center Punch
  8. Masking Tape (I prefer ScotchBlue)
  9. Ruler
  10. Sharpie Pen
  11. Paint Marker
  12. Flathead Screwdriver (optional)
  13. Round-Edge Metal File (optional)
  14. Shop vac (optional)
The whole job takes less than 30 minutes. once I started cutting. This is an easy job, just make sure you have all the tools listed. I did not take photos of every single step, but the descriptions and the photos I do have should be easy to understand and follow.

STEP 1: From underneath the tailgate area, unplug the trailer plug harness from the trailer plug assembly. You can use the flat head screwdriver to help you here if it’s difficult to disconnect.

STEP 2: Using the 10mm socket and combination wrenches, unbolt the trailer plug from the bracket. Set the hardware aside for now.

STEP 3: Let’s work on the plug first. Using a Dremel with a grinding bit, carefully trim away all the little tabs and steps that surround the round portion of the plug. This will make it easier to install into the bumper, since you won’t have to notch and trim the bumper hole.

STEP 4: Now on to the bumper. Using masking tape, mask off the area to the left of the license plate location from top edge to bottom edge. Use your ruler and Sharpie pen and make a dot that is centered top-to-bottom and left-to-right. For left-to-right, measure from the license plate frame up to where the bumper just starts to curve.

STEP 5: With your mark in place, take the center punch and punch a guide on the Sharpie mark. This is important as it will keep your hole saw bit from wandering when you start drilling/cutting.

STEP 6: Using a drill and the 2-1/4” (57mm) hole saw bit, SLOWLY begin cutting the hole. Take your time here, no need to rush the cut. When the drill bit is through the bumper and the hole cutting blade starts to make contact, make sure to hold the drill level with the bumper so that the hole cutting bit is flush with the bumper. Don’t push with force – let the hole saw do its thing.

STEP 7: Once the hole is cut, don’t remove the masking tape yet. Take the round-edge metal file and clean up the hole edges; if you don’t have a file, you could use the Dremel and grinding bit, but use a low speed and take your time.

STEP 8: With the hole cleaned up, insert the trailer plug into the hole, make sure it’s level, and mark the bolt holes with your Sharpie. Center punch the marks, and then drill two 7/16” holes.

STEP 9: If all is well up to here, you can now remove the masking tape from the bumper. Use a paint marker to seal the bare metal edges of the holes you made to help combat rust.

STEP 10: Slide the trailer plug into the hole. It should be easy since the 2-1/4″ hole saw gives some extra room to get the trailer plug through with no hassles. Use the 10mm bolts to attach the plug to the bumper.

STEP 11: Plug the harness back into the rear of the trailer plug, and the relocation mod is complete!

To get rid of the original bracket, I chopped off as much as I can with a sawzall, but then I had a rough edge along the back, and there was still the plate at the bottom that I couldn’t take off without a grinder. Of course I can’t leave it like this, so first I used the Dremel to clean up the sharp edge and remove some paint from the surrounding areas and the plate welds. Next I used some JB Weld Steelstik to blend in the edges of the plate and the cut edges into the shape of the receiver. Once that dried I used a Dremel, a file, and a sanding block to smooth out the shape before finishing it off with primer and matte black spray paint. Even if it’s a spot that most people might not even see, I still like doing a good job because I know I will see it.

And if you can’t see where the bracket used to be, here you go:


----------------------------------------------------------------
This can also be seen at project:KEIRA
Regarding the hole saw bit, Lord Raine… special purchase? I see the 7/16” drill bit is a bit for metal. Haven’t used or seen a hole saw made or sold specifically for metal. Late reply but I’m only looking to relocate the plug now. Thanks for taking the time to work up the build how-to!
 

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Regarding the hole saw bit, Lord Raine… special purchase? I see the 7/16” drill bit is a bit for metal. Haven’t used or seen a hole saw made or sold specifically for metal. Late reply but I’m only looking to relocate the plug now. Thanks for taking the time to work up the build how-to!
Metal hole saws are plentiful, should be obtainable at ace, Home Depot etc
 

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Metal hole saws are plentiful, should be obtainable at ace, Home Depot etc
Harbour Freight has them too, that's where mine came from. If you're not looking to do this for a living, they're fine. Sure, the quality's lower but if you're only looking to use them every once in a while, they'll work, I've used mine to make 3 holes in steel now, one if the bumper and two in the bed, teeth are still fine.
 
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Discussion Starter · #1,073 ·
Hate to be the guy that gets scolded by you, but, I can’t figure out looking through your site what and where you got your sub box. I see posts about the kickers and switching to jl, box is in the background but no mention of it really. Is it a prefab, if so can you disclose the brand and model? Is it custom built?
No scolding, no worries.
My subwoofer enclosure is a prefab that I bought off of eBay way back then. I just did a quick search on eBay and Amazon right now, but unfortunately there's nothing currently available like the one I have. It's the typical 2x10" down-firing enclosure that usually came with a pair of Kicker's preloaded in a package deal, looks like this:

330883

Just an FYI if you find one, be aware - there's different versions. I've seen sub boxes like these built with decent 3/4" MDF (usually the black carpet ones), and I've seen cheap versions (copy of a copy of a copy) built with some cheaper plywood-type material and thin gray fabric.
 

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Discussion Starter · #1,074 ·
Regarding the hole saw bit, Lord Raine… special purchase? I see the 7/16” drill bit is a bit for metal. Haven’t used or seen a hole saw made or sold specifically for metal. Late reply but I’m only looking to relocate the plug now. Thanks for taking the time to work up the build how-to!
Nope - just walked into my local Lowe's and found a Lenox brand hole saw bit:
LENOX 2-1/4-in Bi-Metal Arbored Hole Saw in the Hole Saws & Kits department at Lowes.com

And the 7/16" drill bit is part of my drill bit set from Home Depot, here's the single version:
Milwaukee SHOCKWAVE 7/16 in. Titanium Twist Drill Bit-48-89-4625 - The Home Depot
 

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Discussion Starter · #1,075 ·
Skid Forks, The Missing One (03.30.2021)
Came across a local deal for a used OEM Pro-4X fuel tank skid plate for $40, and since I already installed the OEM Pro-4X oil pan & transfer case skid plates since way back in 2015, I decided to complete the set. For what I do, these are fine (understand that sentence I just said LOL); If ever I go deeper into off-roading my daily driver, I can easily upgrade these skid plates to stronger aftermarket pieces. Anyhow, the fuel tank skid was in decent shape, but needed some refinishing:





Now I don’t know why, but the DIY in me decided to see if I could do something about those dents… which doesn’t make sense considering this would be under the truck, unseen by anyone, and only there to scrape and get dented anyways. So anyhow, I used a few hammers, a metal file, and some pliers to “undent” and straighten out anything that I could. I made sure though that I would only spend 1 hour doing this before stopping myself from getting carried away.








The next day I cleaned the surface, sprayed any rust spots with rust remover (not shown), then topped that with a single coat of self-etching metal primer:



…followed by 1 coat of semi-gloss black:


Not bad for a used fuel tank skid.
While the fuel tank skid paint was drying, I drove to my local Ace Hardware to get some grade 8 mounting bolts:


Ace is the place.

$3 later and back in my garage, I installed the fuel tank skid using 4 M8x1.25x25mm bolts. Installation took a few minutes, all of the mounting points already had threads so it was literally a bolt-on install. Thanks to my suspension lift I didn’t have to even jack the truck up – I just slid under, positioned the fuel tank skid, and bolted it on. Job done!



----------------------------------------------------------------
This can also be seen at project:KEIRA
 

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2010 Nissan Frontier SE 180,000 miles.
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Put My Foot Down (03.17.2021)
After what, almost 7 years of driving around in my Frontier (and my recent Cleghorn trail run), I finally decided to get some all-weather floor mats. Like most people, the first brand I looked at was Weathertech. However I was soon crossing them off the list, because of one major, major flaw in their design: I discovered from other owners that the Weathertech mats only covered less than 30% of the driver’s side dead pedal/foot rest… considering these are supposed to be all-weather mats, what is the point?!?! I use the foot rest every time I drive, and if it’s a trail day and my shoes have sand, dirt, or mud on the bottom, the last thing I want is a floor mat that will let whatever is under the front part of my shoes to seep down behind the floor mat and ultimately into the carpet underneath the floor mat itself!

So with Weathertech not an option, I started looking at other brands and when I read from other owners that the MaxLiner/SmartLiner all-weather floor mats for the Frontier covered the whole foot rest, I decided I’d try them. Although I only wanted to get the front pair, I ended up buying the full front/rear set since it only cost an extra $20 for all three pieces. Thanks to “Amy” (you know, Amazon) a large brown box arrived 2 days later:


Out of the box, the floor mats are pretty thick but flexible, and the textured surface is much grippier than it looks:




Installation was simple – remove OEM carpet floor mats, and fit the new MaxLiner ones. The floor mats had provisions for the OEM floor mat retaining tabs, but the cutouts were on the small side, making it difficult to get the tabs to “grab” correctly. The solution for this was simple: I used an Xacto knife to enlarge the floor hook openings to get the retaining tabs to fit; to be honest, I don’t think this is a big deal at all, and only took a few seconds on each side (driver’s and passengers). With this done, the front mats were secured in place as intended:


Let’s get the question asked earlier out of the way: do the MaxLiner/SmartLiner floor mats completely cover the foot rest? Turns out that they also don’t completely cover 100%… but they do cover about 80% which is still way more than the more expensive Weathertechs. The top edge of the mat in this area does sit fairly high above the surface of the OEM foot rest/dead pedal, and some quick testing (walk on some dirt in the backyard, then sit in my truck LOL) showed that the coverage seemed to be more than enough to help keep any shoe crud away from the carpet:


So dead pedal details aside, I will say this: the MaxLiner/SmartLiner floor mats fit really, really good! The driver’s side mat followed the shaping of the left side trim and transmission tunnel carpet perfectly. The rear portion of the mat was shaped to match the raised contours of the floor carpet, and the rear edge wrapped around the seat leg plastic trim perfectly as well:


The same goes for the front passenger side mat fitment:




Another detail I liked – the portion of the floor mats that overlapped the door sill was also molded to match the contours of the OEM panel, so there’s no weird air gaps underneath. Very snug, very precise shaping, as good as what I’ve seen from Weathertechs (in other vehicles). I did not test the rear one-piece mat because I didn’t intend to use it daily like the fronts, so I have no feedback on the rear. I do know that due to the rear floor of the Frontier tapering downward at the side edges, the floor mat edges aren’t as perfectly formed as the fronts, but again – I don’t really plan on using them.
So far I am very happy with my choice. For the price of just front Weathertechs, I purchased a complete 3-piece set (two front, one rear) of MaxLiner/SmartLiner mats. The materials feel sturdy, and fitment as shown above is exceptional. They also have good surface grip (they look slippery but I’m surprised at how grippy they really are) and all in all, a good value. If you’re in the market for some all-weather mats, give the MaxLiner/SmartLiner brand a try!

----------------------------------------------------------------
This can also be seen at project:KEIRA
Those are really nice. Like the way, they cover the dead pedal better than my Weathertechs. I will say that when new my Weathertechs did form fit like that for a while until I started to go up to Big Bear and other places in the snow. The truck keeps getting better and better!
 

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Those are really nice. Like the way, they cover the dead pedal better than my Weathertechs. I will say that when new my Weathertechs did form fit like that for a while until I started to go up to Big Bear and other places in the snow. The truck keeps getting better and better!
Man y'all with your fancy molded floor mats. Meanwhile I'm over here using the same universal Good Year-branded floor mats in the front and random Amazon one-piece floor mat in the rear that have been in like at least three different trucks.

(I will say, the Smart Liners look like they fit really well. From what I've observed, the "walls" of Weathertechs on all sorts of vehicles tend to flop inward toward the center of the mat. It looks like the Smart Liners have extra molded ribs on the sidewalls to prevent that.)
 

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Discussion Starter · #1,078 ·
I will say, the Smart Liners look like they fit really well. From what I've observed, the "walls" of Weathertechs on all sorts of vehicles tend to flop inward toward the center of the mat. It looks like the Smart Liners have extra molded ribs on the sidewalls to prevent that.
The side walls are definitely thicker (in terms of keeping its shape along the carpet) compared to my cousin's Weathertech's for sure
 
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