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Thanks for letting me know. Found it. It was Minitrukin. He has since removed it but the pictures are there.
yeah.one thing i dont believe in is deleting pics that may help someone else on the forum....i have ran into a lot of unanswered questions of my own from people deleting good info from the past here recently.
 

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yeah.one thing i dont believe in is deleting pics that may help someone else on the forum....i have ran into a lot of unanswered questions of my own from people deleting good info from the past here recently.
This.

I never delete my pictures for that reason. Even the pics of my old Land Rover from four years ago are still up.
 

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Discussion Starter #104
What are we talking about LOL
 

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Discussion Starter #105 (Edited)
Mitsuba Horn Install (08.22.15)


My cousin picked up a box of Mitsuba Turbine Truck Horns from Japan and he gave my brother and I a pair to replace the tiny stock horns with something with a louder and more noticeable sound. The kit includes one high tone (SH-1) and one low tone (SL-1) plus some universal mounting hardware and a cheap relay kit. Originally I thought about just doing a straight swap, putting the new horns in the stock horn location, but once I saw the horns in person and compared them to the OEM horns, there was no way that would happen.


Can you tell which horns are the aftermarket ones? Hint - they’re much larger than the OEM horns.


In case you were wondering what it looks like inside, if you take the covers off you’ll see this.

I figured out a spot in front of the radiator where I could actually fit both horns using the included mounting bracket - and there happened to be a threaded bolt hole on the radiator support that lined up perfect for me, meaning I did not have to bring the drill out. I did have to modify the horns and the bracket a little bit to gain some badly needed forward clearance.


Mounted up front with the horn ends facing down to prevent moisture getting trapped inside.


Here’s a side view. Note how the size of both horns are really pushing the limit of space up front - and this is still without the grill back on.

Switching to a different part of the upgrade, I checked specs and found that the OEM horn relay was rated at 15-amps. That’s not bad, until I realized that the two new horns combined pulled almost 20-amps. The solution was easy - install a dedicated 30-amp horn relay, which I did behind the radiator support. I had 12v+ directly to the battery, and the coil was connected to the OEM horn wire.


12v 30-amp relay installed on the inner side of the radiator support for protection.

With the wiring done, the moment of truth was reinstalling the front grill. Turns out that I had repositioned the horns just right, as they barely cleared the inner portion of the center grill. Now I have a much louder horn (er, horns) that make a truck sound more like a truck, and not a Nissan Versa or something.


Squeezed in with a pinch of clearance behind the center grill.


You won’t know they’re there unless you peek through the center grill.
 

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Ever get your WRF bar painted up, curious as to what you used. Still waiting on mine, im planning to POR15 to paint it, or take it to my local LINEX and get it done that way. Thought id ask and see what you did
 

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Discussion Starter #107
Ever get your WRF bar painted up, curious as to what you used. Still waiting on mine, im planning to POR15 to paint it, or take it to my local LINEX and get it done that way. Thought id ask and see what you did
I just used semi-gloss spray paint on top of self-etching primer. I thought about LineX and Rhino Liner and all the other options, but in the end it's just a small metal bar. I sanded the surface down smooth, then sprayed it over a couple of days. I'll have more pics in this thread soon when I catch up to it (should be about 4 posts away)
 

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Discussion Starter #108 (Edited)
Return to Cleghorn (08.29.15)

Went back to Cleghorn Ridge trail, but this time I had it all mapped out in my GPS, and my cousin joined us for the full route. There were so many side routes that I wanted to take but couldn't (yet) because I was on stock suspension and tires. Near the end, we pulled to the side and took a break to absorb the nice view of Silverwood Lake. It was a nice drive even for a stock truck, and no rattlesnake crossings this time. I need to lift my truck so I can tackle some of the side routes.


My truck leading the way through Cleghorn Ridge again; this time I knew where I was going.


For some reason this angled part of the trail feels a lot more "sideways" when you're sitting inside the truck, as opposed to what it looks like in the photo.


Getting close to Silverwood lake.


Taking a break overlooking Silverwood lake. It was a nice clear day when we took the drive.
 

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Discussion Starter #109 (Edited)
Off-Road Lamp Project, part 1 - Blue Sea Fuse Block (09.20.15)

I had some off-road lamps on order, so this is technically part 1 of that project. It was also the perfect time to install an auxiliary fuse block to support extra electrical circuits. I've used Blue Sea Systems fuse blocks before, so it was a no-brainer when I shopped for a new one for the truck. I went with a 6-circuit ST Blade Fuse Block #5025. I like this model because it has a dedicated negative bus, so all accessory wiring can go straight to the fuse block and nothing extra added to the OEM battery terminals. It also has a clear cover to protect the terminals.

I bolted the Blue Sea fuse block to the OEM factory fuse block cover, the one to the rear of the engine compartment on the passenger's side. For power and ground, I ran a pair of 4-gauge cable from the OEM battery terminals to the Blue Sea block in a specific route in a way that if I had to, I could easily remove the OEM fuse block cover (to gain access below) without having to disconnect anything on the Blue Sea unit.


Here I'm just figuring out the spacing for the BlueSea Systems fuse block and my amp's main fuse holder.


Here's the Blue Sea fuse block bolted down, with ample clearance between it and the amp fuse holder.


Here's how it looks installed in the engine bay. Cable routing allows me to access OEM fuse block underneath, no disassembly required.


Top view, the circuit labels tell you what off-road lamps I had on order.
 

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Discussion Starter #113 (Edited)
Off-Road Lamp Project, part 2 - Xterra Switch Install (10.03.15)

Going inside the cabin for part 2, it was time to get the lamp switch ready. I went with the Nissan OEM Xterra switch #25166-N50002 because I wanted it to blend in with the rest of the interior. Before actually installing the switch, I had to first do some soldering since I did not have a matching harness plug. I used my Dremel to trim away at the harness plug housing in order to gain enough clearance to solder directly to the switch pins. After working out the electrical, I realized that I only need 4 wires, so I used a 4-pin connector harness and got to soldering.


Here's the six small pins and some careful soldering.


Soldering complete, you can see the 4-pin plug in the background.

With the switch side done, I connected the wires to a DEI 611T Latching Module; the module's job is to allow the Xterra switch to function correctly as a push-on/push-off type momentary switch. The 611T is easily programmable to do this, and the module itself was so small that I just mounted it behond the dash panel just above the switch area. So the Xterra switch was soldered up and the latching module was installed and wired up, the final step was to install the switch into the dash panel. I moved the VDC switch from the left side to the center console awhile back, so the new Xterra switch dropped right in place on the left, right next to the cargo lamp switch - which makes more sense to me having all the vehicle drive switches together in the center stack (2wd/4wd, VDC, Hill descent).


Here's how it looks installed in the left-side dash panel. I like how it blends in as if my truck came with it from the factory.

UPDATE 4/3/17: Small wiring update in post #438
 

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Discussion Starter #114 (Edited)
Off-Road Lamp Project, part 3 - White Rhino Bar (10.10.15)

After about 3 weeks (including returning the first delivery because it was the wrong version) my White Rhino light bar finally arrived. I didn’t mind having to get the bar swapped, after all Chris at White Rhino was easy to talk to about the situation, got a second bar shipped right away and even paid for return shipping for the first bar they sent.

NOTE: For future reference, see post #8 for the specs of the original bar I received (too short, for metal bumper Frontiers), and see post #20 for the specs of the second bar I received (that had the correct fitment for 1-piece bumpers) in this thread: White Rhino Back!


Yes, this is exactly how it was delivered - bare, unfinished light bar with a UPS label taped to it. I never knew you could ship this way until now.

Step one was to fit the bar and mark the holes for the side brackets. The center plate of the bar has three slots which correspond to three panel clips on the underside of the bumper. If you remove the clips, you can use regular hardware to attach the White Rhino bar to the bumper. I went with 3 pairs of 1” long grade-8 3/8” bolts and nuts. The slots let me get the bar aligned perfectly in position how I wanted it.


Test fitting the light bar, here it’s attached to the bumper only.

Next I marked the side bracket holes (which are meant to bolt onto two radiator braces) and drilled 5/8” holes. Side note, on the left-side radiator brace there is a small "bump" in the metal that has to be grinded down with a Dremel in order for the light bar bracket to sit flush. After drilling the new holes I put some black paint on the hole edges afterward to help prevent rust. I also used grade-8 hardware here as well. With all 7 mounting points bolted down I could lift the front end of the truck a little using the bar itself, with the bar and the brackets showing no sign of bending whatsoever.


Paint markers come in handy. I didn’t worry too much about how clean the paint was since it would be covered up by the brackets anyways.


Mind the sideways bolts, there’s no nuts on the other side yet, this was just to make sure everything lined up right.


Right about now my PIAA lights were delivered, so I temporarily bolted them onto the bar to make sure everything clears, which it did.


Test fitment of my new PIAA lights onto the White Rhino light bar.


Test fitment is a success. There was enough clearance between the back of the lights and the bumper cover.

With the fitting portion of the installation confirmed, I removed the PIAA lights and I hand sanded all of the surfaces of the light bar to remove all of the surface rust. This took awhile, about 1.5 hours off and on. With that complete, the only work left for the light bar was to paint it. I sprayed the light bar with 1 coat of self-etching primer, let it dry, sanded any imperfections, then another coat of self-etching primer for a consistent surface. Finally, I sprayed 3 light coats of satin black.


In the process of sanding the surface down to remove the surface rust and bring it down to bare metal.


Self-etching primer went on first...


...followed by paint.

The PIAA lights would actually be installed a week after the bar was painted.
 

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Looks good so far. I can't believe they ship those bars like that. They are just asking for bent mounting tabs with them being left exposed like that. Years ago I worked for UPS for a while and I've seen how shipments get treated there. I'm amazed it made it through without damage.
 

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What size bolts did you use for the radiator mount brackets
 

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Discussion Starter #117
Looks good so far. I can't believe they ship those bars like that. They are just asking for bent mounting tabs with them being left exposed like that. Years ago I worked for UPS for a while and I've seen how shipments get treated there. I'm amazed it made it through without damage.
Actually the left-side bracket was just slightly bent, nothing I couldn't fix with a couple hits with a rubber mallet. That wasy easy... hand sanding the rusty surface was what was difficult.

What size bolts did you use for the radiator mount brackets
5/8" x 1.25" with one flat washer (bolt side) and a split washer (nut side) sandwiching the radiator mount and the light bar bracket.
 

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Discussion Starter #118 (Edited)
Off-Road Lamp Project, part 4 - PIAA 520 ATP Lights (10.17.15)

Somewhere in between the few days I took installing the White Rhino light bar, my new off-road lights were delivered. Instead of doing LED bars or small square LED cubes, I went with the classic old-school look and selected the PIAA 520 Halogen Off-Road Lamp Kit. They are 6-inches in diameter, with a steel housing and the easily recognizable "PIAA" light guard grills.


Brand new and shiny - the PIAA 520 6" ATP Lamp Set.

I selected these because of two reasons: first, they had a slim profile, which was required due to how close the White Rhino light bar mounting holes are to the bumper. Second, I picked the "ATP" version, which stands for "All Terrain Pattern" - which is best described as a combination of the fog lamp and flood lamp pattern. I felt that this would be the right beam pattern due to the fact that the PIAAs would be mounted in between the OEM headlamps and the OEM fog lamps. Here's the ATP pattern (photo from PIAA website www.piaa.com):


Normal light patterns up top; PIAA’s “ATP” light pattern below.

Since I already had the Xterra switch wired up and the White Rhino bar was installed and also ready, all I had to do for the PIAAs is bolt the lamps onto the light bar and connect the wiring harness to the Blue Sea fuse block and two wires to the Xterra switch. These last parts of the install only took about 30 minutes, including waiting for the soldering iron to get hot.


They lamps come with a really big relay.


All mounted up and wired, I think the size is perfect for the White Rhino light bar.


Depending on when you look, sometimes you can see the blue/yellow reflection of the PIAA Xtreme White bulb.


I have Phillips Crystal Vision bulbs in the headlamps and fog lamps.


Everything on (low beam) plus the PIAAs.


They're not LED or HID, but I think they are pretty good for old-school halogen.

UPDATE 4/3/17: Small wiring update in post #438
 

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Love the look of those lights on your truck. Giving me the itch to get some driving lights on my truck. I had a set on my last vehicle and i miss that extra output on back roads around here.
 

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Raine, great lights! I'm looking to do something similar with a set of Hella fogs that I already have, and possibly add a pair of the same PIAA All Terrains, on two separate circuits, of course.

Could you take a photo of how your Blue Sea block looks like now with the PIAA wires attached? I assume that the wire from relay to the battery is now routed to the BS block, while the rest is fairly standard, routing from the PIAA relay to ground, lights, and dashboard switch?

Thanks.
 
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