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Artist's rendering of Keira's interior mods...
 

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Discussion Starter #662
Dang Raine. Your build is awesome. I love the thought and detail. I just wish I understood electrical, like at all. lol. Your mechanical mods make perfect sense to me. But when you talk electronics and electrical, you're speaking a language I don't understand. I really like the mods where you thought outside the box. I was originally going to remove the front air dam this weekend when I did my lift. But I really like how you just cut off the part that hangs down. And kept the rest of it for a more finished look. Just one example. Thanks for the great thread.
Electrical isn't that difficult to understand if explained correctly, but it's easy to mess up if done incorrectly ::wink::

Artist's rendering of Keira's interior mods...
LOL
 

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So I'm going to install my cb next week. I have all the parts. I've seen where some people have used the power going to the power supply inside the center console. But I've never taken apart an interior. And I can't find a video on youtube showing how to remove the center console to get to the wires. Also I've never spliced into a wire before. And I don't know where to ground it. See? I'm a total wiring idiot. lol
 

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Discussion Starter #664
So I'm going to install my cb next week. I have all the parts. I've seen where some people have used the power going to the power supply inside the center console. But I've never taken apart an interior. And I can't find a video on youtube showing how to remove the center console to get to the wires. Also I've never spliced into a wire before. And I don't know where to ground it. See? I'm a total wiring idiot. lol
Lift up the center console lid. Remove 3 flathead Phillips screws at the hinge and set the lid aside. Pull the back part of the center console towards the rear seats and it will pop off. You can access the wires there.

If you need more room, remove two screws (one on each side) at the lower rear of the center console (slide your front seats forward to see them. Grab the front cup holders and pull upward - it will pop up and out. Then grab the shifter trim and also pull up and out. You'll see 3 more screws connecting the back half of the center console to the front half. Remove those screws, unplug the two harness plugs underneath where the cupholder usually id, and the back half of the center console will come out of the vehicle.

Then ask someone who's done electrical before to come over and splice your CB into the 12v receptacle... and watch them how they do it so you can learn.
 

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So I'm going to install my cb next week. I have all the parts. I've seen where some people have used the power going to the power supply inside the center console. But I've never taken apart an interior. And I can't find a video on youtube showing how to remove the center console to get to the wires. Also I've never spliced into a wire before. And I don't know where to ground it. See? I'm a total wiring idiot. lol
You are not the only one who finds the electrical work scary...Plugging something in or unplugging it is as far as I understand, installing new wires is a whole new ball game.
Maybe someone here on this forum could do a wiring for dummies thread...installing an after market light, make an instructional how to thread or something...and slowly get more and more advanced with future lessons?
But where would we find such a person?
 

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Discussion Starter #667 (Edited)
Saturday Expanded Audio Tuning w/Umik-1 (04.21.18)

Had some time last weekend to "reset" the audio. I decided when I received the new TWK-88 DSP to start from scratch with all of my settings as if it was a brand new install. If you've upgraded your audio (or are considering it) and you want to get a feel for what it's like to go beyond just "installing and forgetting", read on.

DISCLAIMER: Please note that depending on who you ask, you'll get 398,408,284,032 different methods on how to do this. Everyone has their own way, I have mine (more than just one), someone else might have theirs - so I'm not saying that this is THE WAY to do it, I'm just going to describe the method I used last Saturday to setup my audio system.

First, the tools - I used 5 pieces of equipment and 2 types of software:

A. Schumacher AC Car Battery Charger
B. MiniDSP Umik-1 Calibrated Microphone
C. MacBook Pro Laptop
D. Fluke 115 Digital Multimeter
E. Tape Measure (Park Tool RR-12)
F. Room EQ Wizard (REW)
G. JL Audio TUN 3.0 (Specific to my DSP)


The first thing to do was make sure my battery was going to stay topped up throughout the process, which meant hooking up the battery charger to the battery. It's only a 10-amp charger, but it will keep the battery from dropping below the minimum operating voltage of 12V:


Battery charger plugged in to keep the voltage constant.

Next, I setup the Umik-1. I don't think I elaborated on this device before so for anyone that is interested in really seeing what their audio is sounding like on the digital end of things, I strongly recommend using a Umik-1 to help you get the most out of your aftermarket audio components. Basically the Umik-1 is a calibrated microphone designed to hear a wide range of frequencies. When used with the appropriate software (more info below) you get a graphical representation of what your audio sounds like in your vehicle in the form of a frequency response curve. Using this curve you can fine tune your audio through the system EQ to optimize your audio gear. You can also measure how loud your system goes, you can see how different the music sounds with/without the engine on, etc. The Umik-1 only costs $75 direct from minidsp.com; IMO a very reasonable price to pay for something that does so much.

For testing I positioned the Umik-1 in the driver's seat, with the microphone element angled upward so that it was just about in between where my ears normally are. Yes - there are other methods to using a Umik-1 (some involve taking 12 measurements per side just for setup!), but for today I chose to use a more simple method that would still give me really good results for what I was looking for:


MiniDSP Umik-1 positioned right about where my head would normally be.

With the Umik-1 in position, I ran two USB cables out the left-rear door opening, and I made sure to have all the truck's doors and windows closed during the tuning process. I also had the garage door closed (thus why it was hot!). This way the Umik-1 would mostly hear the actual audio system in my truck, with as little outside noise as possible.


My combo mountain bike/truck stuff garage workstation.

The first USB cable connected the Umik-1 to an extra HDTV + old PC I had setup in the garage. I used this as the monitor for the Umik-1. I also had my MacBook Pro connected to my DSP via a second USB cable so I could change my DSP settings from outside the vehicle, keeping the testing environment as consistent as possible ( I could run both programs on one machine, but since I had two at my disposal, I'll use them both). The last device I had nearby was my Fluke digital multimeter - which I would use specifically for setting amp gain.

The "objective" portion of system setup went as follows - I won't go in depth for each step, I'll just briefly describe each process. Feel free to ask if you need more detail:

1. Set Head Unit and Amplifier Gains
- I chose the multimeter/ohm's law method, which involves hooking up the multimeter to the speaker outputs of the amplifiers and adjusting the gain to reach a target AC voltage based on the formula: Target AC voltage = the square root of watts x ohms.

2. Set Crossover Points and Slopes for Each Individual Driver
- Actual crossover points were based on the frequency range of each individual speaker. Since I am running my Hertz HSK-165 front component system in 'active' (no passive crossover, individual amplification per speaker) I started with a front crossover point of 20kHz-3.6kHz for the dash tweeters, 3.6kHz-100Hz for the front door midrange, 17kHz-100Hz for the Hertz DCX rear door coaxials, and 20Hz-100Hz for the JL Audio subwoofers. All crossover slopes were set to 48dB for a super sharp cutoff.

3. Level Matching Driver Pairs
- Since the driver naturally sits closer to the left speakers (LHD vehicles, obviously) "level matching" is basically decreasing the output of the closer speaker (example - left tweeter), so that both speakers (left and right tweeters) sound like they are at the same volume level (intensity) from the driver's seat. I level matched the tweeters to each other, and then the midrange to each other, and finally the rear fill.

4. Time Alignment
- Time alignment is similar to Level matching in that you compensate for the differences in distance between where you are (driver's seat) and where each speaker is. However where level matching made sure that each pair of left/right speakers sounded like they were at the same volume level, time alignment makes sure that the music from each speaker reaches the listening position at the exact same time - regardless of if some speakers (right side speakers) are farther from the driver's seat than others (left side speakers).

At this point, all of the objective settings are ready. The EQ in the DSP is set to flat, and the EQ that's built into my Kenwood DNX-892 head unit is also flat. For the next couple of weeks I'm going to drive like normal and play music like normal - with the option of using the head unit's built-in EQ to make small changes on the fly if I feel the need.

After 2 weeks I can move any EQ changes into the DSP itself and save it as a DSP preset; the DSP I have lets me save multiple "presets" that can be changed on the fly using the included control knob, without having to hook up my laptop whenever I want to switch the preset. This feature is super helpful, as I can easily compare before/after EQ and see what my ears like more.

I do have a personal custom list of various types of music to test car audio systems; by no means is this a full list but here are some examples (if you want to try them in your ride). Some songs are for musical crispness, some are for directional clarity, some are for testing just for bass, etc.:

"Starboy" - The Weeknd
"Good Enough" - Alison Wonderland
"If You Go Away" - Neil Diamond
"Criminal" - Fiona Apple
"Still Sane" - Lorde
"Cities in the Dust" - Siouxsie & The Banshees
"Like a Stone" - Audioslave
"Karin" - Foil Boy
"I Ain't No Joke" - Eric B. & Rakim
"True" - Spandau Ballet
"Spanish Harlem" - Rebecca Pidgeon
"The Party's Just Begun" - Freestyle
"Big Sur Moon" - Buckethead
"Human" - The Human League
"Lost Stars" - Keira Knightley
"Eyes Without a Face" - Billy Idol
"Jambi" - Tool

Finally, here's the updated 2018 system diagram:
UPDATE: recent system diagram posted, see #880.
 

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Discussion Starter #668 (Edited)
Center Armrest Cloth Cover (04.29.18)

This update will be short and sweet, because this is probably the easiest/quickest mod done to my truck. Install took about 60 seconds, total cost = $12. As far as plushness level, this cloth cover is somewhere in between the OEM armrest and a neoprene cover.

 

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Discussion Starter #669
Thought I'd post a teaser pic of what I'm working on now:

 

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I've had a few armrests wishlist'd for a while now, but I know when I'm camping and the dogs in the back seat get excited, they might put their feet up there and I don't want something that'll get torn up, otherwise I'd be all over stealing that idea...looks great!
 

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Discussion Starter #672

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Discussion Starter #674

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This is a test post.
 

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Discussion Starter #677
Thread seems like it's fixed. carry on people
 

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This update will be short and sweet, because this is probably the easiest/quickest mod done to my truck. Install took about 60 seconds, total cost = $12. As far as plushness level, this cloth cover is somewhere in between the OEM armrest and a neoprene cover.

Hey raine, did you make this or order it?
and if you ordered it wher from?
 

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Discussion Starter #680 (Edited)
Raine, where did you feed your cable to get inside the cab on your power tailgate mod? Also, do you remember what colors the 2 cables you tapped in to?
There is an access hole in the left-rear passenger floorboard, if you remove the door sill panel and peek underneath the carpet, you'll see a rubber grommet - I ran all the wires for the rear mods through this hole (Power Tailgate Lock Mod, UtiliTrack LED Light Mod, and the Rear "Shuttle Camera" wires) and sealed it up with some silicone. The hole exits just to the inside of the frame rail, making it easy to secure the harness to the frame rails all the way back to the rear of the chassis.

Hey raine, did you make this or order it?
and if you ordered it wher from?
eBay
 
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