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Discussion Starter #461 (Edited)
Wasn't feeling the silver after all, was off early from work toady so I resprayed the brackets matte black:

 

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Discussion Starter #463 (Edited)
P&P Recovery Mounts (04.23.17)

Installing an aftermarket steel bumper isn’t for me (right now) for a few reasons:

1. I like the front end of the Frontier, and I’m not too fond of the look of an aftermarket steel front bumper on it; there’s something about how the angular steel bumper lines don’t match with the round fenders that bothers me.

2. Since I have the one-piece bumper, an aftermarket steel bumper won’t be a bolt-on affair since I’d have to permanently chop my bumper in half just for the upper trim piece.

3. My truck is mainly a daily driver, so carrying around a heavy steel bumper all the time and losing some MPG isn’t practical at the moment.

When I read about the P&P Engineering Recovery Points on another thread, and I liked the idea. I used to want the European-sourced matching left side OEM tow hook, but I got a quote from a shop in Great Britain and they wanted $95 shipped - compare that price to the P&P Recovery Points which were $75 for a pair, shipped! I ordered direct from P&P, and I also ordered a pair of inexpensive 3/4” shackles used for fitment/testing during installation.

The parts arrived at my doorstep in 8 days - not bad. When I opened the box, There were two large chunks of metal and some nice looking hardware. The finished shape is decent; it’s not laser-cut perfect, but for $75 I wasn’t expecting a museum piece either. The included Class 10.9 hardware was a nice touch, the bolts are longer than the OEM tow hook bolts, and obviously they gave 2 pairs of hardware - which is good since there are no OEM bolts on the left side. Since I ordered the raw finish, first thing to do was paint; I went with a layer of metal etching primer followed by a few layers of satin black.


Ordered them raw.


Nice hardware, Class 10.9 included with purchase.


I feel like I’ve painted a lot of things lately.

While waiting for paint to dry (one of the things I really, really can’t stand) I did some work with the shackles. I didn’t want to drive around making clanking noises over every bump, so I did some tricks I read about online. First, I put one layer of friction tape around the shackle bolts. Second, I trimmed some shackle isolators to get rid of any side-to-side shackle movement.


Doing the "tape trick” to help reduce and noise.


In the process of trimming isolators for a snug fit.

Installing the recovery points is pretty straightforward. On the right side, remove two bolts and the OEM tow hook is gone. The next step was simply to bolt the right side recovery point to the chassis using the included hardware.


Installation time, removed the OEM tow hook first.


Right side recovery point installed.

The left side wasn’t as simple; unlike the right side, the left side lower valance did not have the cutout for the OEM tow hook. However, the plastic piece had the same cutout shape molded in, so all I needed to do was trim the cutout using my trusty Dremel tool and a cutting wheel.


There is no hole here, so I have to make one.


My trusty 9 year old Dremel tool has been so useful.


Trim and some sanding to smooth out the opening like it was OEM.


Left side recovery point installed.

Here’s a couple of photos showing how low the shackles hang compared to the rest of the bumper:


Right side recovery point.


Left side recovery point.

Here’s what it looks like looking in from the left side wheel well:


Easy access to the shackle pin.

And finally, a front view after reinstalling the center valance piece:



Before I did the actual install I was worried that the shackles would hang down too low, but I'm okay with the positioning. However you can see in the photo above that the "gap" in the lower valance for the OEM tow hook is offset and not wide enough in relation to the new shackle positions. I have to trim a little more off the center valance in order to give the shackles more clearance and allow them to rotate all the way forward to at least 90-degree horizontal (in case I actually have to use them for recovery). I’ll probably tackle this after I take delivery of a pair of genuine Crosby shackles.

Side note: The no-name shackles I used here will stay on the truck during daily driving. I figure if someone shady decides to steal the shackles, they can take the no-name ones, I’ll only install the Crosby shackles when I actually need to use them =)

EDIT 05/07/17: I like the red ones better:

 

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Installing an aftermarket steel bumper isn’t for me (right now) for a few reasons:

1. I like the front end of the Frontier, and I’m not too fond of the look of an aftermarket steel front bumper on it; there’s something about how the angular steel bumper lines don’t match with the round fenders that bothers me.

2. Since I have the one-piece bumper, an aftermarket steel bumper won’t be a bolt-on affair since I’d have to permanently chop my bumper in half just for the upper trim piece.

3. My truck is mainly a daily driver, so carrying around a heavy steel bumper all the time and losing some MPG isn’t practical at the moment.

When I read about the P&P Engineering Recovery Points on another thread, and I liked the idea. I used to want the European-sourced matching left side OEM tow hook, but I got a quote from a shop in Great Britain and they wanted $95 shipped - compare that price to the P&P Recovery Points which were $75 for a pair, shipped! I ordered direct from P&P, and I also ordered a pair of inexpensive 3/4” shackles used for fitment/testing during installation.

The parts arrived at my doorstep in 8 days - not bad. When I opened the box, There were two large chunks of metal and some nice looking hardware. The finished shape is decent; it’s not laser-cut perfect, but for $75 I wasn’t expecting a museum piece either. The included Class 10.9 hardware was a nice touch, the bolts are longer than the OEM tow hook bolts, and obviously they gave 2 pairs of hardware - which is good since there are no OEM bolts on the left side. Since I ordered the raw finish, first thing to do was paint; I went with a layer of metal etching primer followed by a few layers of satin black.


Ordered them raw.


Nice hardware, Class 10.9 included with purchase.


I feel like I’ve painted a lot of things lately.

While waiting for paint to dry (one of the things I really, really can’t stand) I did some work with the shackles. I didn’t want to drive around making clanking noises over every bump, so I did some tricks I read about online. First, I put one layer of friction tape around the shackle bolts. Second, I trimmed some shackle isolators to get rid of any side-to-side shackle movement.


Doing the "tape trick” to help reduce and noise.


In the process of trimming isolators for a snug fit.

Installing the recovery points is pretty straightforward. On the right side, remove two bolts and the OEM tow hook is gone. The next step was simply to bolt the right side recovery point to the chassis using the included hardware.


Installation time, removed the OEM tow hook first.


Right side recovery point installed.

The left side wasn’t as simple; unlike the right side, the left side lower valance did not have the cutout for the OEM tow hook. However, the plastic piece had the same cutout shape molded in, so all I needed to do was trim the cutout using my trusty Dremel tool and a cutting wheel.


There is no hole here, so I have to make one.


My trusty 9 year old Dremel tool has been so useful.


Trim and some sanding to smooth out the opening like it was OEM.


Left side recovery point installed.

Here’s a couple of photos showing how low the shackles hang compared to the rest of the bumper:


Right side recovery point.


Left side recovery point.

Here’s what it looks like looking in from the left side wheel well:


Easy access to the shackle pin.

And finally, a front view after reinstalling the center valance piece:



Before I did the actual install I was worried that the shackles would hang down too low, but I'm okay with the positioning. However you can see in the photo above that the "gap" in the lower valance for the OEM tow hook is offset and not wide enough in relation to the new shackle positions. I have to trim a little more off the center valance in order to give the shackles more clearance and allow them to rotate all the way forward to at least 90-degree horizontal (in case I actually have to use them for recovery). I’ll probably tackle this after I take delivery of a pair of genuine Crosby shackles.

Side note: The no-name shackles I used here will stay on the truck during daily driving. I figure if someone shady decides to steal the shackles, they can take the no-name ones, I’ll only install the Crosby shackles when I actually need to use them =)
Nicely done.
 

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Awesome write up on the recovery points. I think you've convinced me to pull the trigger.
 

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Discussion Starter #467
Awesome write up on the recovery points. I think you've convinced me to pull the trigger.
Honestly, I expected a cleaner build for $75, but that includes shipping (and they're heavy) so realistically the parts alone are around $60, good enough... much better when painted though for sure.
 

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Raine's 2014 4x4 "KEIRA" Build Thread

I'm completely with you on the aftermarket bumper. I like the look of the truck with the one piece. I would only justify adding one if it were Aluminum, which of course adds minimal weight and would most likely have the least impact on fuel economy. I would however add a hidden winch if someone made one.

I love this shackle idea though. I always thought it was odd that Nissan didn't put two recovery points onto an off-road oriented trim level.

Nice job in this install


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk Pro
 

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Discussion Starter #471
Oh look, Raine is adding things to my shopping list again. I think my truck has a crush on Keira. :D
Don't even blame me for anything you buy in the near future. LOL

I'm completely with you on the aftermarket bumper. I like the look of the truck with the one piece. I would only justify adding one if it were Aluminum, which of course adds minimal weight and would most likely have the least impact on fuel economy. I would however add a hidden winch if someone made one.

I love this shackle idea though. I always thought it was odd that Nissan didn't put two recovery points onto an off-road oriented trim level.

Nice job in this install


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk Pro
I like the idea of a hidden winch too but I still haven't seen an install that I liked.
 

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I'm with the others... well done, nice mod, something added to my list. Your build is an inspiration. Thanks for posting
 

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Discussion Starter #473 (Edited)
I think I like the red ones better:

 

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Looks great! In my mind, this is a better looking option over the driver's side tow hook from a EU wrecking yard (and ends up being about the same price). I just ordered my set of the rear bumper ones.
 

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Discussion Starter #476
Looks great! In my mind, this is a better looking option over the driver's side tow hook from a EU wrecking yard (and ends up being about the same price). I just ordered my set of the rear bumper ones.
When you get them, let me know where they attach at the back. I suspect they use the same holes as the hitch/receiver, which seems higher up on the frame than the front locations... I'm wondering if they position the shackles low enough to clear the rear bumper at 90-degrees (like if you have to get pulled out with a tow strap)
 

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Those tow points look slick!

I agree, the red shackles are better.
 

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Whelp, I got the rear recovery points from P&P and they don't fit if you have a tow hitch in spite of the website saying they do. So that sucks. I emailed them and they were helpful and offered a refund but I think I'll just keep them and put them on the front (they look like they might be identical to the front ones). I told the guy they might want to edit their description. Raine, if the rear shackles were used in towing the recovery strap would definitely hit the bumper at a straight horizontal tow which would be a little sketch. They look nice though but it might be moot for those of us with a tow hitch.
 

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Discussion Starter #480
I can't seem to find the P&P you bought them from
Got a link?
P&P Engineering | Design, Fabrication, and Engineering Services

Whelp, I got the rear recovery points from P&P and they don't fit if you have a tow hitch in spite of the website saying they do. So that sucks. I emailed them and they were helpful and offered a refund but I think I'll just keep them and put them on the front (they look like they might be identical to the front ones). I told the guy they might want to edit their description. Raine, if the rear shackles were used in towing the recovery strap would definitely hit the bumper at a straight horizontal tow which would be a little sketch. They look nice though but it might be moot for those of us with a tow hitch.
Good to know.

So I'm guessing they were meant to mount on the same 4 bolts that the OEM hitch uses? Judging from how the front ones mount, if I had an aftermarket radiator skid (which bolts to the tow hook locations) I think it would be the same problem.
 
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