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2015 Nissan Frontier SV Crew Cab LWB 4x4
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1,906 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Question for Alldogs Offroad...

You list a modified tophat for using early Tundra shocks with a Titan Swap. Is there a particular reason why this is specifically for a Titan swap, as opposed to using such tophats to use such shocks on a Frontier with the conventional D40 lower control arm?

I ask because going through various manufacturers' shocks I find that while there are some shocks for Nissan products the min/max/travel specifications seem to deviate a lot but none have as much travel as the part originally intended for the Toyota:

OE Application​
Series​
P/N​
Compressed​
Extended​
Travel​
Nissan D40 Frontier​
KYB Excel-G (OE-ish Equivalent)​
341467​
11.02"​
14.96"​
3.94"​
Nissan D40 Frontier​
Rancho RS9000XL​
RS999787​
11.05​
15.06​
4.01​
Nissan D40 Frontier​
Old Man Emu Nitrocharger Sport​
90003​
11.30​
15.35​
4.05​
Nissan D40 Frontier​
Bilstein B6 4600​
24-137430​
10.55​
15.08​
4.53​
Nissan D40 Frontier​
Monroe OESpectrum​
71102​
10.99​
15.56​
4.57(?)​
Nissan D40 Frontier​
Bilstein B8 5100​
24-187053​
10.55​
15.26​
4.71​
'00 Toyota Tundra​
Bilstein B8 5100​
24-261425​
13.23"​
18.35"​
5.12"
Nissan D40 Frontier​
Bilstein B8 6112​
47-266711​
?​
?​
?​

So I guess I'm wondering if there's something that precludes using your custom tophat with a stock LCA instead of a Titan LCA, or if it's more a matter that no one has looked for enough increased articulation out of the stock D40 suspension to have had this setup tested.

In a nutshell I'm attempting to evaluate what are the causes of the limits of the Frontier's stock suspension. If I interpret what I've read correctly, irrespetive of the driveline issues themselves, droop on the stock supension seems to be a function of the travel length of the stock shock, but the extent of compression is limited by the bump-stops. An increase in droop would eventually result in binding of a ball-joint due to the design of the ball and socket, but until that point there's still room to increase travel.

My further assumption is that the nature of the spring itself along with how high or low it is affixed to the shock housing will determine the static height of the truck, for a given loaded weight on the shock, and that the particular shock, outside of that position of the lower spring perch relative to the bottom end of the shock, isn't especially relevant. The only characteristic the shock itself imparts on ride height is that lower perch as it establishes a starting-point.

Thanks,
 

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2015 Nissan Frontier SV Crew Cab LWB 4x4
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1,906 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
One thing I have not found yet, the distance from the lower spring perch to the eye of the bottom of the shock.

323880


I'm attempting to figure this out, but I'm not finding this information. I may not be using the right terminology in the process of searching.
 

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Premium Member
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5,729 Posts
  • That is what beimg able to do jobs with exact measurements,
    323887
 
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