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You have to remember, there is no more energy in premium vs regular gas. The only difference is the burn rate of the fuel. The additive packages are the same.
 

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Very true, but you can see that the millions of dollars of marketing spent by big oil to buy premium has worked very well for them, Its amazing how people will argue til their blue on how much better their car runs on premium even if its a 1998 honda civic with 8:1 compression. Its useless to argue with them.
 

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Very true, but you can see that the millions of dollars of marketing spent by big oil to buy premium has worked very well for them, Its amazing how people will argue til their blue on how much better their car runs on premium even if its a 1998 honda civic with 8:1 compression. Its useless to argue with them.
It is similar to a placebo effect.
 

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Very true, but you can see that the millions of dollars of marketing spent by big oil to buy premium has worked very well for them, Its amazing how people will argue til their blue on how much better their car runs on premium even if its a 1998 honda civic with 8:1 compression. Its useless to argue with them.
I have a minor in chemistry and my first undergraduate research assistant job was with a Dr Chris Clausen from LSU. He had a grant from Standard Oil to do research on oil and gasoline additives. I got involved with that. He got me out of using racing oil and premium gas.
 

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I have a minor in chemistry and my first undergraduate research assistant job was with a Dr Chris Clausen from LSU. He had a grant from Standard Oil to do research on oil and gasoline additives. I got involved with that. He got me out of using racing oil and premium gas.
So with all due respect to your minor in chemistry, under "certain conditions", that story is bunk. The certain conditions, my 92 GP referenced earlier, has 4Cam quasi-hemi heads from the factory, 9.5:1, Lord only knows what kind of squish pattern they threw down in the late 80s, a single knock sensor and batch-fired fuel injection. I have dyno sheets proving that with the custom-burned EEPROM that's in it now, which was developed with Premium + a hit of racing fuel on a dyno, engine output is much higher than with regular. 221WHP actually over the stock OE rating of 210 at the crank.
Now, back to the regularly scheduled program. Yes, for most STOCK vehicles Premium is a waste of money. The engine and PCM must be ready and able to use the extra octane and dwell that's possible. Mine can, for what it's worth. And the burn time and chemistry of Premium are indeed different than Regular and Mid-Grade.
 

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So with all due respect to your minor in chemistry, under "certain conditions", that story is bunk. The certain conditions, my 92 GP referenced earlier, has 4Cam quasi-hemi heads from the factory, 9.5:1, Lord only knows what kind of squish pattern they threw down in the late 80s, a single knock sensor and batch-fired fuel injection. I have dyno sheets proving that with the custom-burned EEPROM that's in it now, which was developed with Premium + a hit of racing fuel on a dyno, engine output is much higher than with regular. 221WHP actually over the stock OE rating of 210 at the crank.
Now, back to the regularly scheduled program. Yes, for most STOCK vehicles Premium is a waste of money. The engine and PCM must be ready and able to use the extra octane and dwell that's possible. Mine can, for what it's worth. And the burn time and chemistry of Premium are indeed different than Regular and Mid-Grade.
The only difference chemically is the octane. Octane does work with burn time and that is all. All other additive packages are the same between grades of fuel. An interesting side note is that the octane component can evaporate off the fuel. At some point, it would have the same octane as regular. Don't remember the amount of time. Always thought that interesting.
 

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No degree here, put remember well how I hated organic Chem in school trying to memorize all those carbon and benzene chains..... glad there's someone who enjoys doing it for the rest of us though.
 

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So with all due respect to your minor in chemistry, under "certain conditions", that story is bunk. The certain conditions, my 92 GP referenced earlier, has 4Cam quasi-hemi heads from the factory, 9.5:1, Lord only knows what kind of squish pattern they threw down in the late 80s, a single knock sensor and batch-fired fuel injection. I have dyno sheets proving that with the custom-burned EEPROM that's in it now, which was developed with Premium + a hit of racing fuel on a dyno, engine output is much higher than with regular. 221WHP actually over the stock OE rating of 210 at the crank.
Now, back to the regularly scheduled program. Yes, for most STOCK vehicles Premium is a waste of money. The engine and PCM must be ready and able to use the extra octane and dwell that's possible. Mine can, for what it's worth. And the burn time and chemistry of Premium are indeed different than Regular and Mid-Grade.
Forgot to mention that octane additive is easy to make and used to be very cheap. 2 chemicals added together did the trick. Toluene and Benzene. Used to be able to buy a gallon of each for less than $5. It lasted for a long time.
 

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87 octane fuels tend to be less refined and contain more unstable hydrocarbons. As the months pass during storage these unstable components react to form gums, varnishes and lower octane hydrocarbons. As a result the octane can decrease within months for 87 octane fuels, especially when stored under less than ideal conditions. 93 octane fuels are more refined and contain more stable hydrocarbons. These stable hydrocarbons can last 2-3 times longer than 87 octane fuel. Even in proper storage 87 octane gas can start to degrade in 3 months, 93 octane fuel should last closer to 9 months before degradation is noticeable. Keep in mind that 93 octane fuels are still susceptible to octane loss and vapor pressure decreases due to butane evaporation.

Octane stability in racing fuels is much different because fuel quality is valued more than production cost, unlike the pump gas industry where cost drives the majority of refining decisions. A large part of any quality race fuel is consistency. Race fuels are designed to be high in octane to allow for increased compression ratios and boost levels. In order to achieve high octane and consistent composition, pure chemical components are mixed with highly refined gasoline. The components used in Sunoco race fuels are very stable and can retain octane in excess of 2 years when properly stored. We have test results confirming octane stability in our unleaded, leaded, ethanol-free and ethanol fuels. The butane vapor pressure issue is addressed with the use of chemical components that boil around 80°F. The higher boiling point means vapor pressure decreases won’t be as common until the fuel is exposed to temperatures above 80°F.

Some high octane unleaded fuels, 260 GT Plus, and octane boosters contain the additive MMT. MMT is a very effective octane booster and doesn’t harm oxygen sensors or catalytic converters so, it is ideal for modern vehicles. Please note this additive is degraded by sunlight and can lose all octane boosting properties within minutes of exposure (L.Ter Haar). Degraded MMT will settle to the bottom of the container as a rust colored material that can clog fuel lines and filters. Extra care needs to be used when storing and handling MMT fuels in order to minimize contact with sunlight. The additive is stable in gasoline as long as no UV light hits the fuel. Sunoco 260 GT Plus is our only race fuel that contains MMT.

 

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87 octane fuels tend to be less refined and contain more unstable hydrocarbons. As the months pass during storage these unstable components react to form gums, varnishes and lower octane hydrocarbons. As a result the octane can decrease within months for 87 octane fuels, especially when stored under less than ideal conditions. 93 octane fuels are more refined and contain more stable hydrocarbons. These stable hydrocarbons can last 2-3 times longer than 87 octane fuel. Even in proper storage 87 octane gas can start to degrade in 3 months, 93 octane fuel should last closer to 9 months before degradation is noticeable. Keep in mind that 93 octane fuels are still susceptible to octane loss and vapor pressure decreases due to butane evaporation.

Octane stability in racing fuels is much different because fuel quality is valued more than production cost, unlike the pump gas industry where cost drives the majority of refining decisions. A large part of any quality race fuel is consistency. Race fuels are designed to be high in octane to allow for increased compression ratios and boost levels. In order to achieve high octane and consistent composition, pure chemical components are mixed with highly refined gasoline. The components used in Sunoco race fuels are very stable and can retain octane in excess of 2 years when properly stored. We have test results confirming octane stability in our unleaded, leaded, ethanol-free and ethanol fuels. The butane vapor pressure issue is addressed with the use of chemical components that boil around 80°F. The higher boiling point means vapor pressure decreases won’t be as common until the fuel is exposed to temperatures above 80°F.

Some high octane unleaded fuels, 260 GT Plus, and octane boosters contain the additive MMT. MMT is a very effective octane booster and doesn’t harm oxygen sensors or catalytic converters so, it is ideal for modern vehicles. Please note this additive is degraded by sunlight and can lose all octane boosting properties within minutes of exposure (L.Ter Haar). Degraded MMT will settle to the bottom of the container as a rust colored material that can clog fuel lines and filters. Extra care needs to be used when storing and handling MMT fuels in order to minimize contact with sunlight. The additive is stable in gasoline as long as no UV light hits the fuel. Sunoco 260 GT Plus is our only race fuel that contains MMT.

There are some specialized fuels that we don't get, but as for what we use in our vehicles it is all the same except for octane, period.
 

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Bottom line is that a gallon of regular gas contain the same number of BTU's as a gallon of premium. The only changes that can be made are in burn rate and how clean one burns.
 

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