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Last week I went to a small trail by my house and saw a new raptor stuck in the mud, he was stuck pretty good.


I felt bad and was going to get some cheap straps i had (with metal hooks) and on my way out I hit some stupid stick that ruined my day, long story short god gave me a sign or something and I chickened out and didn't want to ruin my truck anymore by pulling him out.

I did go back and try to help him with no avail, deep mud in FL is a killer and even a raptor with locking rear diff its gonna get stuck.







So I started to think about it, how was I going to do it anyway, obviously reverse in and hook him up to my hitch and use that to tie to his two front hooks he had in the rear, I was going to use 4wd L and keep it in first and just slowly pull..

but my questions are, do I use 4wl? or is that gearing too weak? keep in 4h?

Also I started to think, if I had to actually yank him a few time then thats when damage can really happen?

Either way, give me the do's and don't of pulling someone out safely and effectively please.

Thanks,
 

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NEVER YANK, just steady pulling in 4lo


Sent from my iPhone X using Tapatalk Pro
 

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Discussion Starter #3
OK and pulling from the rear always or what about using the front hook and going backwards? if were using 4lo to utilize the lowest gear (is the strongest though) what about reverse thats even lower?

also hooking up to the hitch is the best from the rear?

is there a 4x4 for dummies book?
 

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try you best to never pull backwards

only when it is a must

I am sure there is a book, but if your hitch is bolted right and a class 4 or above you are good to go
just be steady, and NEVER use chains to pull out a stuck vehicle

seen to many FATALITIES that way
 

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use a snatch strap that flexes - prevents sudden jolts
 

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It very much depends on how the vehicle is hung-up. There are some Youtube videos with some rather impressive damage from not hooking on right for the conditions, I remember one of an XJ Cherokee that was stuck in deep mud and they basically broke the front axle free because they pulled on the body rather than trying to reach the part that was actually hung-up.

If that were my truck first thing I'd do is unload the dirtbike and ramp to lighten the back and allow the tailgate to be shut or temporarily removed. I'd have to look over how close someone could get to help, and decide if it was better to hook to the hitch or to try to hook to the rear axle, and that choice might be dependent on how badly the front axle is stuck. If the front is also stuck it might be better to pull on the hitch.

Interesting that his $65,000 didn't keep him from getting stuck.
 

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That truck is stuck on the diff, I wouldn't entirely blame it on the mud. This might be one of those times where a quick jerk is the only way to get him loose. However, slow and steady is usually best.

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full throttle, you dumb enough to need my help.....

ill get ya out lol.



i never use chains or metal ends, i do you d rings at the truck if needed or a strap connector if the length isnt long enough.
i have seen some scary calls with other stuff, but a fabric strap is fine just dont stand on it while pulling.

from the pictures you posted i would have hooked up on the left rear tow point and "bounced" back and forth a little in the frontier, that would have been enough to get him moving.
if i was in my f150, i would hook up same place and just drive with tension since it has so much more weight and power.

to add a little more, if the raptor would be in 4hi and in reverse with turning the wheel all the way passenger and light throttle with me pulling with either truck.
all that together and dude is out in a few seconds. i dont see the rest of the environment so i cannot see what you are truly dealing with, but thats about it.
 

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it has nothing to do with the machine, it is the driver, some people are weekend warriors and NEVER REALLY wheel
or are just beginners
but they think if the buy a heavy truck they can keep up with light Wranglers

I built up my Wrangler (TJ) very well, but if I let a fool drive it
he would get stuck often

we call those trucks, "Mall Crawlers"
 

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Last week I went to a small trail by my house and saw a new raptor stuck in the mud, he was stuck pretty good.


I felt bad and was going to get some cheap straps i had (with metal hooks) and on my way out I hit some stupid stick that ruined my day, long story short god gave me a sign or something and I chickened out and didn't want to ruin my truck anymore by pulling him out.

I did go back and try to help him with no avail, deep mud in FL is a killer and even a raptor with locking rear diff its gonna get stuck.


So I started to think about it, how was I going to do it anyway, obviously reverse in and hook him up to my hitch and use that to tie to his two front hooks he had in the rear, I was going to use 4wd L and keep it in first and just slowly pull..

but my questions are, do I use 4wl? or is that gearing too weak? keep in 4h?

Also I started to think, if I had to actually yank him a few time then thats when damage can really happen?

Either way, give me the do's and don't of pulling someone out safely and effectively please.

Thanks,
NEVER never never use straps with hooks on the ends! Never hook a strap to your ball hitch! Both can become projectiles and kill.
For your rear 2" reciever they make an adapter that will let you connect a 2" or 3" recovery strap to your hitch. As long as the stuck vehicle has rated points (3rd pic appears to be) a shackle on there is ok. A soft shackle is much safer, but more $. Your shackles should always be stronger than your straps.
 

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It very much depends on how the vehicle is hung-up. There are some Youtube videos with some rather impressive damage from not hooking on right for the conditions, I remember one of an XJ Cherokee that was stuck in deep mud and they basically broke the front axle free because they pulled on the body rather than trying to reach the part that was actually hung-up..
that video is pretty crazy!!! that poor guy & his XJ....RIP
 

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ha, in my vehicles and specifically when i am in groups.
i try harder to get stuck, stay out of 4wd unless needed ect.

recovery is such an important part to being offroad often overlooked as a skill to be able to recover people stuck up to their elbows.
 

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He should have used the bike to tow himself out. Ha ha

He is cased out (sitting on the frame or suspension) and yanking on a cased out truck causes much unnecessary strain. Though generally I first try to bump/tow it out and only if that fails do I go further. If I was to recover the truck properly, I would remove the bike and close the tailgate. Then stick the end of a high lift into the hitch receiver 2" square hole. Jack the truck up, so that it is no longer cased. Then fill the hole the tire dug; add the board if necessary. As this point you can probably just drive out. Or tow him out if needed.

Hitches are great recovery points. I use a hitch shackle like this. You can stick the end of a strap into the square hole and put a pin through it if you have nothing else. But the pin is then in bending and not double shear. THe pin can bend and you strap is now stuck. You either have to cut the strap of the pin. Cutting the pin it is cheaper. You can store the strap in the bed still attached. Or closed in the tailgate. If you are going to pull someone out hitch to hitch, and you only have 1 hitch shackle (and at least 2 pins), use the shackle in their truck. That way if the pin bends and gets your strap stuck you can take you strap home and cut the pin. Remember to weight down the strap on the drive home so it does not fly out of the bed, drag behind you on the highway, and get stuck on something.


I have recovered vehicles both forward and backwards. 2wd/4hi/4 low. Generally the least amount of traction necessary. I have also used tow straps with hooks. Generally I like the hooks with the little clips on the end.


If I am going to use a tow strap with a hooks and it doesn't have a clip, I will often duck tape the hook in place to prevent it from coming off. If I am going to hook the hook on a hook, like the front tow point of our trucks, I will bypass the hook and fish the sewn loop portion through the trucks hook and not connect with the tow straps hook. Yes the hook will still be dangerous if the strap becomes unattached, but typically it is pretty tight. If not I will tape it in place. Or if I am forced to connect hook to hook with no clips I will tape.

I also like to run all the twist out of my tow strap before I start to pull. Twist in your strap loads the fibers unevenly. Bad for the strap in the long run or if using undersized straps.

If the vehicle has BIG recovery loops like the back of the Raptor, I have slung the strap through the loop (eye of the strap through the recovery loop and the whole strap fished through the eye). You can connect with a shackle if you have one. I have also sung a frame before as a recovery point.
 

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I was under the impression that recovery straps with integrated metal hooks are not for high-load situations since a failure of the hook turns it into a missile that could hurt someone or something if it gives-out while the strap is under load.

Obviously if that's all you have then you go with what you have, but you're probably better off leaving that kind of hook in a street vehicle and getting one with rope loop ends for the offroad vehicles.
 

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I was under the impression that recovery straps with integrated metal hooks are not for high-load situations since a failure of the hook turns it into a missile that could hurt someone or something if it gives-out while the strap is under load.

Obviously if that's all you have then you go with what you have, but you're probably better off leaving that kind of hook in a street vehicle and getting one with rope loop ends for the offroad vehicles.
Agreed. The one I kept in my truck is big and had looped ends. But I have used ones with hooks plenty. In fact when I had my 2wd hardbody I had a strap with hooks and no clips. I got that truck struck so much and used that strap often till I snapped it.
 
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