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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
OK this is weird. Attempted to replace the front parking/signal bulb w/ an LED bulb. They didn't light at all. Now the parking lights don't work at all. Put back original bulbs. All other lights work, turn signals, taillights, etc. Checked fuses under the hood, and next to glove box, all check out. Is there another fuse box somewhere? I didn't see a fuse location that seemed to match w/ parking lights, but only found 3 fuse boxes.
Haven;t had any luck w/ LED replacements on this vehicle, they either don't work at all or blow fuses. Supposed to be exact replacements, but apparently not. I've used LED replacements on other vehicles w/ no problem.
Any help appreciated.
 

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I've been getting into LED lighting for some reason lately. I don't know why you've got no front turns signals for sure, but I suspect I know the reason they blew your fuses. Did you try putting a new fuse in the marker spot anyway even though the current one didn't look blown? Did you check all the fuses for your other lamps(brakes and turn signals)? Sorry I can't be more help...new to playing with LEDs myself.

I can probably explain some of your fuse blowing. Apparently our frontiers lights are wired similiar to some GM and Toyota vehicles where the grounds and High and Low are in a different configuration than usual. In order to switch brake lights for instance you can't use a normal 3157 LED you have to use a 3157-CK LED. I can't explain why we can use a normal incandescent bulb, but need special LEDs but I've found that to be true. Check out V-LEDS.COM | LED Dome, Map, License Plate, Reverse, DRL, Turn Signal, Brake Lights they have some pictures of the bulb recepticals that explain it better than I can. You'll also need to put on a resistor if you use LEDs for your turn signals because you will get "hyper" flashing where you turn signals will flash too fast because they don't draw enough current. Hope I helped some....good luck! I've swapped everything exept my turn signals to LED because I didn't want to deal with resistors to make them work. Good luck....
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks for the info! I purchased the led's from V-led, supposedly were the recommended types. Guess I'll send 'em back. The LED marker lights were too big ( and blew fuses), and the stop/tail just blew fuses. Haven't found the fuse for the marker (parking) lights. I checked any fuse I thought might be possible. All other functions appears to work, have not found anything else not working except parking lights. After reading the manual, I suspect the switch control module may have been affected. There may in fact be LED versions that work, but after this experience I'll stick to bulbs.
thanks for the help!
 

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If it's any consolation I know you weren't the first to fall victim to this! I only put 2+2 together after reading about similiar problems on here and almost fell into the same trap. I completely understand you going back to regular bulbs! Hopefully it's an easy/cheap fix. I have a feeling more and more car makers will slowly start equiping cars with factory LEDs all the way around as the technology developes further and gets cheaper. They are expensive and quite honestly not THAT much brighter than regular bulbs at 1/4 of the price. Anyway...thanks for posting about this and please advise what the fix was when you get it sorted out!
 

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X2... I never tried LED bulbs but I have no front parking lights, however I have turn signals... Anyone know what the problem could be???
 

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I've checked them all... Which fuse box? Btw the rear parking lights are working- its just the front
 

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Nvm... I went back through and it turns out that the "illumination" fuse in the aft fuse box under the hood was not seated properly... Hope this helps someone in the future
 

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This topic comes up regularly on automotive enthusiast Forums all over the internet. Folks replace their double-filament park-turn and/or tail-brake bulbs with LED "equvalemts", and either they don't work, or worse, blow fuses.
Here's a quick illustration that perhaps will help to understand why this occurs (then again, maybe it will only add to the
confusion):

Figure 1 represents the inner wiring of an industry-standard 3057 wedge-base dual-filament bulb. There are 4 separate
terminals, arranged in a single row. The inner terminals connect to a ~5 Watt filament typically used for parking or tail lamp function. The outer terminals connect to a ~21 Watt filament trypically used for turn, brake, or hazard lamps.

Vehicle manufacrturers can wire their bulb sockets several different ways. Figures 2 and 3 represent two of the popular
connection styles. They can vary from manufacturer to manufacturer, from one model year to another, and even from
model to model within a model year. A 2008 Tundra and 2008 Camry might not be wired identically (this example is just to make the point; I have not actually researched those specific models). Another benefit of these arrangements is that the bulb can be inserted either way into the socket with no change in function. Applying ~12V to the "Park" wire will turn on the 5W filament, and applying ~12V to the "Turn" wire will turn on the 21W filament, which appears ~4X brighter.

LED replacements do not have two separate banks of LEDs to replace each filament. This would be too expensive and they would not all fit in the available space. Instead, two different current-control elements (which might just be resistors) are used to establish two different current levels, and therefore two different brightness levels, through the same array of LEDs. In figures 2L and 3L, the rectangles represent the aforementioned current control devices.

Figure 2L represents a 3057-equivalent LED bulb designed to be used in applications wired as in Figure 2. Similarly, Figure 3L represents a 3057-equivalent LED bulb designed to be used in applications wired as in Figure 3.

So, what happens if you insert a "2L" LED bulb into a socket wired like Figure 3? The common ground connection within the bulb shorts the Park signal to Gnd (ground), which blows a fuse when the parking lamps are turned on. The same thing will happen if a "3L" LED bulb is inserted into a socked wired like Figure 2.

If this wan't bad enough, even if you manage to buy LED bulbs that match your socket wiring, some may only work properly if you happen to insert them in the right direction (which is often not marked).

Unfortunately, manufacturers usually do not publish how their sockets are wired. You either have to physically inspect the socket, measure it with a meter, or depend on trial and error (or perhaps luck).

 

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This topic comes up regularly on automotive enthusiast Forums all over the internet. Folks replace their double-filament park-turn and/or tail-brake bulbs with LED "equvalemts", and either they don't work, or worse, blow fuses.
Here's a quick illustration that perhaps will help to understand why this occurs (then again, maybe it will only add to the
confusion):

Figure 1 represents the inner wiring of an industry-standard 3057 wedge-base dual-filament bulb. There are 4 separate
terminals, arranged in a single row. The inner terminals connect to a ~5 Watt filament typically used for parking or tail lamp function. The outer terminals connect to a ~21 Watt filament trypically used for turn, brake, or hazard lamps.

Vehicle manufacrturers can wire their bulb sockets several different ways. Figures 2 and 3 represent two of the popular
connection styles. They can vary from manufacturer to manufacturer, from one model year to another, and even from
model to model within a model year. A 2008 Tundra and 2008 Camry might not be wired identically (this example is just to make the point; I have not actually researched those specific models). Another benefit of these arrangements is that the bulb can be inserted either way into the socket with no change in function. Applying ~12V to the "Park" wire will turn on the 5W filament, and applying ~12V to the "Turn" wire will turn on the 21W filament, which appears ~4X brighter.

LED replacements do not have two separate banks of LEDs to replace each filament. This would be too expensive and they would not all fit in the available space. Instead, two different current-control elements (which might just be resistors) are used to establish two different current levels, and therefore two different brightness levels, through the same array of LEDs. In figures 2L and 3L, the rectangles represent the aforementioned current control devices.

Figure 2L represents a 3057-equivalent LED bulb designed to be used in applications wired as in Figure 2. Similarly, Figure 3L represents a 3057-equivalent LED bulb designed to be used in applications wired as in Figure 3.

So, what happens if you insert a "2L" LED bulb into a socket wired like Figure 3? The common ground connection within the bulb shorts the Park signal to Gnd (ground), which blows a fuse when the parking lamps are turned on. The same thing will happen if a "3L" LED bulb is inserted into a socked wired like Figure 2.

If this wan't bad enough, even if you manage to buy LED bulbs that match your socket wiring, some may only work properly if you happen to insert them in the right direction (which is often not marked).

Unfortunately, manufacturers usually do not publish how their sockets are wired. You either have to physically inspect the socket, measure it with a meter, or depend on trial and error (or perhaps luck).

I'm pretty sure the front turns are CK wired like the rear brakes. I contacted V-leds last week. They do not have any CK switchbacks and are unwilling to make any for me. If anyone knows of another place to buy let me know...until then my turns remain incandescent.
 
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