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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello to all. I'm new to the site and am still learning to navigate it so forgive my ignorance if I am posting in the wrong place. Anyway I am in the beginning stages of planning a summer 2017, two week overland trip through British Columbia and perhaps as far as The Yukon. Most of the overlanding I have done has been on trails and areas that I am already somewhat familiar. This trip 90+% will be unknown at least north of the border. I am seeking any help on vehicle setup, route planning etc. The main goal of this trip is fishing. My dad, son and I will be doing the trip. It's a bucket list trip for my dad hence the fishing aspect. Also looking to connect with a small group (one or two other vehicles) to join the excursion for the obvious safety issues. I would like the party to be somewhat near (within 500 miles or so) Sacramento so we could meet up for day or weekend excursions prior to the big trip. Better to meet and interact with the people you want to plan something like this with so you know you'll get along. Thanks for the support and look forward to pointers and advice.
 

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That sounds like an amazing trip! I'm not much for fishing myself but NW Canada and the Yukon area in general are simply stunning scenery and the wildlife diversity is phenomenal! Just look out for the mosquitodactyls and the giant bears and you'll be fine.
As for vehicle prep here's my basic checklist;
-33" fairly aggressive tires for as much flotation and grip as possible as you are likely going to encounter some mud and other low traction surfaces.
-At least 1 locker for the same reason
-A winch is essential in the back country for when the tires aren't enough to keep forward progress
-I would highly recommend some kind of satellite location or communication device as cell service will be spotty at best in much of the area
-Keep the truck as light as possible as you'll be carrying lots of gear so if you decide on some skid plates for protection (I'd recommend the eng and trans skids at least), stick with aluminum instead of steel. Same goes for the winch bumper, go with tubing or alum if possible to help keep weight down while also giving you protection from accidental close encounters with large animals on the roads/trail.
-You'll want a small lift to clear the tires and get you some clearance under the vehicle. I'd keep it around 3" tops and I'd also recommend going with a strut or CO lift over basic spacers as ride quality will be better and you're going to be spending a LOT of time in the truck.
-If you'll be doing any traveling at night you should have at least a small LED light bar or a couple light pods for aux lighting. They also help with night time camp lighting.
-If you haven't already, I'd swap out the stock battery for a good AGM unit. You'll get better reserve capacity and CCA plus some peace of mind.
-A small (12 - 14"-ish but no bigger than 16") chainsaw should be on your list of requirements as well. Not only does it help cut downed logs into firewood but it also helps to clear the trail in case you run across a downed tree blocking your path
-A good, waterproof tent is a MUST! you will see some rain so make sure your shelter is easy to set up and that it will keep you, your clothing/essentials and bedding dry.
-A small, reliable grill and enough fuel containers for the trip
-Don't forget some bear bags to keep tasty bear treats off the ground and away from your tents and vehicles.
-And of the course the basics like food, water, survival gear, extra batteries for flashlights etc..
-A small solar charging kit would be nice to have as well to help charge small devices so you don't have to rely on your vehicles charging system. Goal Zero makes some great little packable solar kits. They are avail at REI or online.
-A water filtration system (and some sanitizing pellets) is a good thing to have in the back country as well. They take very little space and can be a life saver if you run out of potable water. Sawyer makes a great little kit. Several of these can be found at REI as well.

I'm sure there are others but this is a good starting point.
 

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^^^ Excellent list Nomad.


OP, you might want to post in the Canada section of the forum. The local guys will be more familiar with route planning.
 

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The drive up though BC and Yukon is definitely worth it! You'll see lots of wildlife for sure and if you into fishing there's lots of fantastic places for that to. I just finished a rather long 3600 mile road trip down the Alaska Highway and back a couple weeks ago, the road was in pretty nice shape and definitely lots of critters about. I live and work in Whitehorse, yukon so if your looking for ideas and spots to go let me know. Sounds like a good trip your planning.
 

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Be prepared for long stretches of wilderness, lined with hundreds of lakes and rivers you can fish. We have a big and beautiful province here, I cannot lie. The size surprises some people though; as you are on the road and the hours pass and yet you are only half way to where you want to be. We have only 3.6 million people in our province and California is much smaller and has more than the population of all Canada.





Be sure to have your proper licences, the Conservation Officers here are strict with that and it can be big fines if you are not playing by the rules.


All of Nomad's suggestions are very good. I would emphasize the chainsaw, and tow ropes (I prefer chains) to pull any logs off back roads. Having a shovel is valuable as well.

I am not a fisherman, but I do travel the roads a lot. If you have any questions about specific locations/towns, let me know. I do know a guy that owns a private fishing lodge - FYI.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Thank you for the input and info. I am familiar with BC and Alberta (not the Yukon). Born in Alberta and lived and visited BC (Grand Forks) a few years as well but it's safe to say that I was not born into an adventurous family when it comes to off-roading. In addition to the list I was thinking of a snorkel for a little more performance and less apprehension at water crossings. I have found finding locker and snorkel options hard to come by for my 2014 Fronty. Any resources I may want to consider? Looking for mechanical rear locker instead of ARB or air lockers.
 

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ARB and TJM both make snorkels for the Frontier or check out the ebay snorkel option for the Navara there a whole lot less expensive to. I'm not sure what roads your planning on traveling on but up here the snorkel could be handy for a creek crossing I suppose but it'll be of more help keeping your air filter a whole lot cleaner from all the dust (depending on which Hwys you travel).
As far as lockers go from what I can tell options are limited and depend on what axles you have; spartan, ARB, Detroit Trutrac(limited Slip) Lokka (currently only available for the front) are some options to look at...

I'd pick up a copy of the Milepost, its a great source of info for the Yukon, northern BC and parts of AK as well, as these books for BC seem to be pretty decent https://www.mec.ca/en/product/5044-391/Northern-BC
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Excellent. I have only found one source in the USA for a 2014 so far that has one and now having looked at the eBay Australia it looks familiar only with a 300% mark up. So it may be a dumb question but I am assuming I am matching the 2014 Navara D40 even though it's a diesel?
 

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Two things I always tell people is to choose a tire and tire size that is common. Nothing worse than being stuck somewhere because you wrecked two tires and cannot get anything same/similar enough to continue. Almost any shop in the world can get their hands on a 265/75/16 and a 285/75/16 pretty easy. Might not be the same tire, but the same size.

Same goes for driveline modifications. Keep them simple. Broken custom or one off parts in the middle of nowhere is no good. If factory or easy to find parts are used, a breakdown is only a minor hassle.
 

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Don't worry about having the exact same year. 2005-2015 are all the same. And mine came with directions for 3 diesel variations plus the one petrol (gas) variant. The template I got was spot on with the big hole (the kit even included the hole saw) and the bolt holes were close enough it wasn't a problem making it work. The only thing that didn't work was the silicone sleeve meant to attach the snorkel duct to the air box. The openings were the right size, but the overall size and shape of a large, fat S kept it from working since it was just a short, straight piece we needed. A quick trip to Ace Hardware fixed it.
 

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Rear axle vent mod for water crossings as well.
 

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Two things I always tell people is to choose a tire and tire size that is common. Nothing worse than being stuck somewhere because you wrecked two tires and cannot get anything same/similar enough to continue. Almost any shop in the world can get their hands on a 265/75/16 and a 285/75/16 pretty easy. Might not be the same tire, but the same size.

Same goes for driveline modifications. Keep them simple. Broken custom or one off parts in the middle of nowhere is no good. If factory or easy to find parts are used, a breakdown is only a minor hassle.
This is exactly why I sold my 255/85r16 tires and bought 265/75r16. I called multiple shops to try and order a spare and no one had it in stock and would have taken more then a week to get one in.
 

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This is exactly why I sold my 255/85r16 tires and bought 265/75r16. I called multiple shops to try and order a spare and no one had it in stock and would have taken more then a week to get one in.
Same reason why I went with 31x10.5's on my old Ford Ranger. I could have fit 32's with some minor trimming, but 32's can be hard to find. 31x10.5s you can find anywhere the world over.
 

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I'd recommend a proper set of auxiliary lights - a set of big fogs along with some powerful spots should light your way nicely at night.

Along with the excellent stronger-battery recommendation, have some spare fuses at the ready.

Set up a blog, and update on a frequent basis :) (you WILL have a Satellite-based Internet connection, won't you?!).
 

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Global Positioning System

It may be worth the expense to have a Lorance system. Contact rugged rocks for details as that unit is well known for durability and reliability for the sea going angler set and the off road racers.

They could prove their worth in an medical emergency or fire evacuation route.

The Geo spotter is another location unit that should work well in back country.

thanks for sharing the plan.

regards
::smile::
 
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