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Guy is a legit “overlander”.. didn’t you notice the map on his hood? ?
 

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I saw that. I also saw all the money he spent on things, trailer included and he is still rolling the OEM tires.
Mileage, wear and possibly the annoying sound of an aggressive A/T. Said he was following that certain river for a long haul. How about the suspension on that trailer, pretty Sweet!
 

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Those Black Series trailers are legit. They've been tested on some of the toughest tracks in the outback. Can see some of their popups on the 4wd Action channel on youtube.

I also wondered about the tires when I saw the video the other day. Nice setup though!
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 · (Edited)
Guy is a legit “overlander”.. didn’t you notice the map on his hood? ?
I also noticed the lack of self-extraction equipment. For all of the stuff he had on his roof, no upgraded jack or traction-aids.

Those Black Series trailers are legit. They've been tested on some of the toughest tracks in the outback. Can see some of their popups on the 4wd Action channel on youtube.

I also wondered about the tires when I saw the video the other day. Nice setup though!
They're legit, but the HQ15 is heavy, 4722lb dry weight according to the manufacturer's website. That's asking a lot of most tow vehicles when off-road in the mud, and if the tongue weight is within specs for the truck then the trailer is still sitting at more than two tons on just two tires. That's probably why he hot stuck, the trailer axle pushing onto the dirt twice as hard as the truck axles each are.

He might have actually been better off with the HQ17. It's heavier at 5520lb, but is double axle, and again if the tongue weight is right then the trailer would be around 1.5 tons per axle. Still heavy, but possibly not as bad.

I'm a little surprised that this manufacturer doesn't have a double-axle trailer in the lighter weight classes, since that would possibly perform well off road in situations like dunes or mud.
 

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@TWX like most mishaps, this was a combination of many small errors. large trailer, OEM tires, overconfidence in his "differential locker" attempting a U turn in sketchy spot, no recovery gear which always means no experience off road.
While this gentleman looks well intentioned, he simply bought his way in to a hobby and got a little out side of his ability.
 

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He probably learned a lot from the experience. He had a ton of questions and judging by his gear (and the cost of it all) he has a lot of freetime to spend on the hobby so he'll probably get alot better. Wish I had a trailer like that to get my better half to go camping with me lol
 

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I also noticed the lack of self-extraction equipment. For all of the stuff he had on his roof, no upgraded jack or traction-aids.



They're legit, but the HQ15 is heavy, 4722lb dry weight according to the manufacturer's website. That's asking a lot of most tow vehicles when off-road in the mud, and if the tongue weight is within specs for the truck then the trailer is still sitting at more than two tons on just two tires. That's probably why he hot stuck, the trailer axle pushing onto the dirt twice as hard as the truck axles each are.

He might have actually been better off with the HQ17. It's heavier at 5520lb, but is double axle, and again if the tongue weight is right then the trailer would be around 1.5 tons per axle. Still heavy, but possibly not as bad.

I'm a little surprised that this manufacturer doesn't have a double-axle trailer in the lighter weight classes, since that would possibly perform well off road in situations like dunes or mud.
I agree.

Many factors involved here. My old super duty would have had trouble. I personally would never haul a trailer off road. I'd drop it at the camp site then go 4wheeling. A tent works if I'm going primitive down some tough tracks.
 

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@TWX like most mishaps, this was a combination of many small errors. large trailer, OEM tires, overconfidence in his "differential locker" attempting a U turn in sketchy spot, no recovery gear which always means no experience off road.
While this gentleman looks well intentioned, he simply bought his way in to a hobby and got a little out side of his ability.
We all have to start somewhere.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
I agree.

Many factors involved here. My old super duty would have had trouble. I personally would never haul a trailer off road. I'd drop it at the camp site then go 4wheeling. A tent works if I'm going primitive down some tough tracks.
I can understand the desire to go boondock in a very remote place and with some comfort, but by that same token if the nature of the comfortable, arguably luxurious trailer means that one gets stuck less than fifty feet from the improved road then there's a definite problem.

My biggest complaint, that this guy's issue aptly demonstrates, is that getting the balance of weight to features right is difficult, maybe even impossible. For myself I'd want a comfortable place to sleep and a good bathroom, but probably half of the interior on that particular trailer would be lost on me. I wouldn't mind having a very rudimentary kitchen with most kitchen features being outdoors, nor would I need to have a lot of other diversions like a TV or a fancy sound system. I basically want to sleep and relieve myself in safety.

I wish that there was a carbon-fiber popup cabover canopy that has exactly what I want, but so far that doesn't exist.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
We all have to start somewhere.
True, but normally this is something that someone works up to a bit. New truck, new camping/recreation gear, new trailer, new custom graphics etc, I tend to be a little less forgiving than I would with someone that didn't buy the whole kit and caboodle at once. Kind of along the same lines that I judge a guy that gets a Ford Raptor stuck more harshly.
 

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You are all bozos!
This is not off roading. This is barely off road. Can you see the road? He parked about 60 feet off the road on a mostly flat surface. Again, not off-roading by any definition of the term.
You city people think off roading is going down a non-paved road. Dirt roads or gravel roads are not off road, they are roads, thus could be called "roading". You do not need to put it in 4wd just to drive down a dirt road. Did you see the tow truck driver lock his hubs only when he was about to do the extraction? He was in 2wd.
Off roading is where ATVs or modified vehicles blazed a path through un-improved surfaces, thus making the path by repeated passes. These paths (jeep roads, off-road trails) mostly require 4wd vehicles and often modification to the suspension and drivetrain.
Also, Virgin UT, is clay, Lots and lots of clay. Clay, when wet, turns to peanut butter. It takes a very, very modified vehicle to drive through deep, thick, sticky mud/dirt like that - big tires at low psi.
The guy with the trailer had parked when dry, so did not even need 4wd to park there, but after a storm rolled through the mud became hard to even walk through, much less move a vehicle.
He did not park there in the mud. There are no tracks behind the trailer. Why are you so hateful to think the driver was dumb? He may have been off hiking when the rain came in and who knows why he did not move. Perhaps he did not know that dirt would become so bad so fast.
The tow truck driver makes a lot of money after storms pass through, even towing highly modified vehicles.
The reason to tow a camper down a ROAD is to get to the prime camping spots. Thousands of people do this all the time all over the SW.
Again, your all bozos!
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
@0truck0 You do realize with your assertion that,

Off roading is where ATVs or modified vehicles blazed a path through un-improved surfaces, thus making the path by repeated passes. These paths (jeep roads, off-road trails) mostly require 4wd vehicles and often modification to the suspension and drivetrain.
that you're heading off into a fallacy called "Appeal to Purity" or "No True Scotsman," don't you?

You're right, he's not far from a road in this particular case. On the other hand, having watched the vast majority of that guy's recovery videos, it's pretty clear that what may be a road one day is a sucking jeep-trail of mud and sand another day, simply based on the weather. What may be a track (to use the Australian term) that a four door sedan can take one day may turn into a sloppy mess that Matt's Jeep even struggles with a bit. If you want to argue the nature of what a road is, that's fine, but if the road is not passable to anything short of four wheel drive trucks, then I'm not personally concerned if someone refers to it as off-roading instead of calling it four-wheeling. The way you describe it, one could consider the Rubicon Trail to be not off-roading.

As for your assertion,

Did you see the tow truck driver lock his hubs only when he was about to do the extraction? He was in 2wd.
Why don't you cue-up the video to around 1:07?

And for,

The guy with the trailer had parked when dry, so did not even need 4wd to park there, but after a storm rolled through the mud became hard to even walk through, much less move a vehicle.
He did not park there in the mud. There are no tracks behind the trailer. Why are you so hateful to think the driver was dumb? He may have been off hiking when the rain came in and who knows why he did not move.
If you look around 1:32 you'll see clear evidence of tire tracks behind the trailer, right up to where it hits the soft stuff and sinks in. The driver of the truck also asserted, as explained by Matt in the intro, that he tried to make a U-turn and got stuck, and he confirms this during the video. The guy didn't park and come back to a vehicle that had sunk in his absence.

Did you watch the same video as the rest of us? Because it doesn't sound like it.
 

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none of this is worth my time to study or analyze, and I def wont be taking time to pick apart any comments, some of which I scanned quickly through, and def will not cut and past quotes of any comments and further analyze them. You must be way more bored than I am.
But
Who wouldn't want to see a bozo take a too-big trailer off roading?
So I glanced over comments before watching video.
Turns out all the guy did was drive down a ROAD and make a left turn into a dirt parking area to turn around.
I watched vid, but barely got past the 1 min mark after skipping past the intro material, realizing that this was not an off-road video, and the guy was not going off road, and there was nothing unusual or dumb about turning around other than he likely did not realize how bad this red clay dirt gets when it gets a little wet. I've been there in the rain, so I know, but anyone else would have no clue.
No matter how he got there, he did not do anything insane. His tires would be fine in most any other dirt parking lot in most of the locations next to a road in this country, even with a trailer in tow.
If you want to see bozo, look at the yellow Jeep's other tow videos where the bozo takes a lexus car down a real off-road trail and gets stuck. That's a bozo.
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
You must be way more bored than I am.
Maybe I am, given that I'm at home because work has dictated work from home to the best of one's abilities and I basically don't have anything to do. I suspect a lot of other people are in the same boat, so as far as I'm concerned, nitpick-away!
 
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