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Discussion Starter #1
OK - picked up my new to me 2006 Frontier V6 , 6 speed 4x4 SC so far I like it gut it's kind of hard to get into the cab with out moving the seat back. Seat bolsters kind of get into the way once inside it's good to go. Does seem to be a smaller cab then the 97 Hard body I had though.

The owner kept some maintenance paper work and I noticed a couple of things -

One was the clutch pedal sensor - that blocks starting if the clutch isn't in and it looks like the Nissan Dealer replaced the entire clutch pedal assembly with bracket. Does this seem right - if the sensor goes bad yhou have to chane out the entire pedal/sensor???? The part was $164. In March of 2015.

At the same time they changed out both cam chains , tensioner face & seals. I kind of thought the v6 had cam belts. Is there a common problem with timing chains on the V6??? I'm wondering if the PO got confused with chains vs cam belt changing out.

Also had a recall - ECM relay done at the same time.

Any thoughts ???:surprise:

LBM
 

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The 2005 and later Frontiers have the VQ40DE engine with three timing chains. There is one primary chain that connects the left and right cams to the crank and two secondary chains, one for each pair of cams on each bank. The chains and tensioners were made by Borg-Warner in the US. As the dies stamped out the upper chain links, they wear. As they wore, the links were not stamped as cleanly as they should have been. This caused issues with the poorly stamped links cutting into the plastic tensioner faces. Over time, the upper chains would cut through the plastic and start riding on the steel plunger, which created a "whining" noise. This occurred on 2005-10 VQ40DE engines. Because some chains were fine and others had varying degrees of poorly stamped links, there's no telling if a vehicle with this engine in this era will have this happen nor at what mileage it will occur. The good news is: if you've had the timing chains replaced, you shouldn't have any issues with it happening again. Since you have a manual transmission, you don't have to worry about the radiator cooler issues that plague these vehicles. Fuel sending unit failures are also common.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Great Thanks. I guess only 2 of the chains on my 06 were bad since they only changed out 2. And the fuel sending unit was also replaced. 124000 miles on it and it looks like it's never been off the pavement.

So what's the story on replacing the entire clutch pedal when the sensor goes bad???? Any Idea?

LBM
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Yea - I'm sure it's just the way the seats are compared to the plain bench seat just sliding on in. It's just getting used to it & sliding the seat back before I get out. I'll get used to it - sure feels good when I'm in it. Every rig is different. It's taking awhile to get used to the way every thing works which is different then my Jeep and my Dodge truck and they are different from each other.

LBM
 

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Great Thanks. I guess only 2 of the chains on my 06 were bad since they only changed out 2. And the fuel sending unit was also replaced. 124000 miles on it and it looks like it's never been off the pavement.

So what's the story on replacing the entire clutch pedal when the sensor goes bad???? Any Idea?

LBM


I'd guess the same logic as the dealers replacing the entire rear axle if an axle seal leaks.
 

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If they replace an assembly as opposed to fixing the smaller item they make more money in less time and no customers coming back due to the repair not being fixed still.


Clint
 

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As I recall, there are two clutch interlock switches, each switch sensing ends of the clutch pedal stroke. These do fail and are inexpensive. As a tip, the switches press against small black dime-sized plastic pads on the upper pedal casting. The little pads disintegrate with time and fall away, at which time the truck won't start because the switch won't close! The fix is a cinch, but the problem isn't apparent in the darkness.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Two switches seems overly complicated. I've jumped switches in the past to bypass similar problems - anyone do the same here. I'm from the days when your "safety switch" was your brain.

LBM
 

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Great Thanks. I guess only 2 of the chains on my 06 were bad since they only changed out 2. And the fuel sending unit was also replaced. 124000 miles on it and it looks like it's never been off the pavement.

So what's the story on replacing the entire clutch pedal when the sensor goes bad???? Any Idea?

LBM

It was only the upper timing chains that were affected, so, per the TSB, only replacing those two chains is required.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
OK that also makes sense. Was this a Factory Recall or was the cost on the owner if it was out of warrenty. Kind of looked to me the PO actually had to pay for it.

LBM
 

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OK that also makes sense. Was this a Factory Recall or was the cost on the owner if it was out of warrenty. Kind of looked to me the PO actually had to pay for it.

LBM
When I have had warranty work done the pricing is sometimes on the invoice, but, was of no charge to me.

Not knowing anything about the clutch switch, sometimes there is an update to the entire assembly and or it is cheaper for them to swap out an entire assembly rather than the one part. I know Nissan replaces the entire axle/bearing as an assembly when there is an axle seal leak. Easier to just pop the axle assembly out and plug a new one in than to mess with pressing bearings on and off.
 
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