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I drove a versa I bought new in 2012 for 45k miles before changing the oil. It's got 56 and still runs fine. It's got the expected click noise from the engine that many of the 2012 versa get... But it's a work horse. I drove it over curbs and off road too. Hauled lumber etc. Not bad so far for a 3k new car in 2013 ( I worked for Nissan and got a huge discount as part of my severance package)
 

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I drove a versa I bought new in 2012 for 45k miles before changing the oil. It's got 56 and still runs fine. It's got the expected click noise from the engine that many of the 2012 versa get... But it's a work horse. I drove it over curbs and off road too. Hauled lumber etc. Not bad so far for a 3k new car in 2013 ( I worked for Nissan and got a huge discount as part of my severance package)
Changing oil isn't what people imply it is. I've had Acuras that I put 200k on and only changed oil every 50k miles... Those had leaks though so they were getting a quart a month lol. You change your oil because it makes sense since there are things that can/are likely to happen inside that warrant it. But if your engine isn't shaving pieces of it self off, and isn't burning the oil, you can wait much longer than prescribed. You usually see two stories out of high mileage cars... I regularly changed the oil 2x more often than suggested, or I changed it 2x less often , but also regularly. I think oil changes are there mitigate the fact that every engine is different, however if you had the golden sample engine that was machines perfectly and the metalurgy was perfect... I doubt it matters as much.
 

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Changing oil isn't what people imply it is. I've had Acuras that I put 200k on and only changed oil every 50k miles... Those had leaks though so they were getting a quart a month lol. You change your oil because it makes sense since there are things that can/are likely to happen inside that warrant it. But if your engine isn't shaving pieces of it self off, and isn't burning the oil, you can wait much longer than prescribed. You usually see two stories out of high mileage cars... I regularly changed the oil 2x more often than suggested, or I changed it 2x less often , but also regularly. I think oil changes are there mitigate the fact that every engine is different, however if you had the golden sample engine that was machines perfectly and the metalurgy was perfect... I doubt it matters as much.
If this were true, fleet managers wouldn’t be changing the oil in their fleets but every 50k miles.

Oil loses its ability to lubricate over time. Waiting 50k to change it will accelerate wear. Maybe you won’t notice it if you only keep for 100k though.


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If this were true, fleet managers wouldn’t be changing the oil in their fleets but every 50k miles.

Oil loses its ability to lubricate over time. Waiting 50k to change it will accelerate wear. Maybe you won’t notice it if you only keep for 100k though.


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Changing your oil is similar to buying insurance, in almost all cases the cost compared to the loss of money caused by down time if the car breaks down etc makes it obvious to change it as frequently as possible. You don't have to look far at all to find proof that oil changes are not a requirement of a long life engine, just the same as you don't have to look far to find someone complaining about a blown motor even after following the required maintenance. That's why I'm saying that the engine itself seems to be the more important variable
 

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You need to link this every time we have another of those "I change my oil every 3,000 miles because I want my engine to last" threads.
I think a large part of it is that he drove over 300 miles a day. The majority of engine wear occurs when the engine is cold and in the few moments when there's low oil pressure at startup after sitting for several hours, anti-drain-back valve be darned.

When I was a mechanic, I couldn't count how many people were surprised that their "low-mile" car needs more work than a car that ran 100 miles a day. That 100-mile-a-day car spends most of its time at operating temperature. Meanwhile, I have a coworker that lives maybe 200 yards from our building, and yet she drives to work. Can't wait until she says her car needs new catalytic converters.
 

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I think a large part of it is that he drove over 300 miles a day. The majority of engine wear occurs when the engine is cold and in the few moments when there's low oil pressure at startup after sitting for several hours, anti-drain-back valve be darned.

When I was a mechanic, I couldn't count how many people were surprised that their "low-mile" car needs more work than a car that ran 100 miles a day. That 100-mile-a-day car spends most of its time at operating temperature. Meanwhile, I have a coworker that lives maybe 200 yards from our building, and yet she drives to work. Can't wait until she says her car needs new catalytic converters.
I’ve got a long a story about my dream car 20 years ago (94 maxima 5 speed) and rusted out cats- not easy to diagnose
 

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Frontier #1 (2002 Supercharged Desert Runner aka "Runner") reached 460,000 before my son gave it to his mechanic (good home since it was still running well, but needed the rear engine seal replaced). I gave it to him at 360,000 miles, though Fontana Nissan really wanted it bad when I bought Frontier #2 (Red2). Fronitier #2 (2010 King Cab LE) was traded in at 348,000 miles when it was going to cost me about $4,000 to replace the catalytic converters and fix a malfunctioning traction control (I miss Red2). I got a 2016 SV crew cab equipped a little better than the 2010.. I don't trust the front-wheel-drive Nissans, but the trucks seem almost indestructible if you keep the fluids changed on a regular basis. The current truck is my fifth Nissan pickup, the first being a 1973 Datsun that ran over 200,000 miles before it was snuffed out in its prime by a drunk driver.
 

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Changing your oil is similar to buying insurance, in almost all cases the cost compared to the loss of money caused by down time if the car breaks down etc makes it obvious to change it as frequently as possible. You don't have to look far at all to find proof that oil changes are not a requirement of a long life engine, just the same as you don't have to look far to find someone complaining about a blown motor even after following the required maintenance. That's why I'm saying that the engine itself seems to be the more important variable
The oil breaks down. It's more than insurance. If it was only insurance why not dump some bacon grease or crisco in there?

While the engine quality lottery helps, heat and friction will destroy the best engine in short order. OIl also needs help. Modifiers and additives help keep your engine running.

There is a lot more to it when you start adding variables like wet sumps, etc.
 

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The oil breaks down. It's more than insurance. If it was only insurance why not dump some bacon grease or crisco in there?

While the engine quality lottery helps, heat and friction will destroy the best engine in short order. OIl also needs help. Modifiers and additives help keep your engine running.

There is a lot more to it when you start adding variables like wet sumps, etc.
it doesn't break down to the degree that you go from some to none in 40k or even 100k miles unless you already lost the engine lottery. The engine lottery is the biggest part, but there's no way to know if you won until you didn't lose, that's why I said it's insurance. I for sure just changed oil a year ago in a 2012 I bought new and put 45ish k on, and asked the mechanic how the oil looked and he said " looked ok, when did you change it last" so I went and had a look myself, and it did in fact look OK. I'd be willing to bet if you took an engine that managed 200k, and just stopped changing the oil, as long as it wasn't leaking, you'd be able to get 20-30k between changes without issue- because the engine itself was a winner.
 

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it doesn't break down to the degree that you go from some to none in 40k or even 100k miles unless you already lost the engine lottery. The engine lottery is the biggest part, but there's no way to know if you won until you didn't lose, that's why I said it's insurance. I for sure just changed oil a year ago in a 2012 I bought new and put 45ish k on, and asked the mechanic how the oil looked and he said " looked ok, when did you change it last" so I went and had a look myself, and it did in fact look OK. I'd be willing to bet if you took an engine that managed 200k, and just stopped changing the oil, as long as it wasn't leaking, you'd be able to get 20-30k between changes without issue- because the engine itself was a winner.
Sure, because a couple dudes visually looking at used motor oil is totally a legit substitute for oil analysis.

“Looked okay.”

Totally legit.


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Who’s willing to bet the gen2 still outlasts the gen 2.5? 🤷‍♂️
I'm not takin any cash on those odds. Can't see a crappy DI engine ever outlasting a proper port-injected one, and I've owned both. My Cooper Turbo DI was a trainwreck.
 

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it doesn't break down to the degree that you go from some to none in 40k or even 100k miles unless you already lost the engine lottery. The engine lottery is the biggest part, but there's no way to know if you won until you didn't lose, that's why I said it's insurance. I'd be willing to bet if you took an engine that managed 200k, and just stopped changing the oil, as long as it wasn't leaking, you'd be able to get 20-30k between changes without issue- because the engine itself was a winner.
I had an 83 Camaro v6 that I bought at 24k and sold at 317k. Original engine, T5 manual trans and rear axle. Never rebuilt, never opened except for a new Melling oil pump as the pan had hit an object and gotten cracked and figured might as well swap it out while the pan was being R&R'd. Ran 80 LBS indicated oil pressure @cold-start, held 40PSI at hot idle, regardless. As most Chevys in the 80s, it leaked some oil despite my best efforts, so I changed it about 3 to 4k intervals and added as needed. Some yrs I put 50k on it in a year as I had some really big commutes for work, between different jobs. Since it wouldn't keep it in place anyway, I just used Castrol conventional and bought the 12 quart cases to keep 3 or 4 in the "trunk". I think folk get way too uptight about "I change mine every 3,300 miles and I'll stop what I'm doing or change the oil the nite before if I'm going on a trip that puts me at 3,317 miles before returning home." I think you get the idea.

I also have a 1992 Grand Prix 3400 4cam 5-speed sedan that I've owned since December 1997. Used to be my DD and she also got 30 to 40k miles in a year some years, again, long commutes, bought it at 82k now has 187k and change, now the weekend toy, always used Mobil I there due to the complexity of the engine and the long oiling system path.

Most and I say most, engine's will treat you well if you treat them well. Anything manufactured in the last 25 yrs by BMW is exempt from that statement.
 
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I'm not takin any cash on those odds. Can't see a crappy DI engine ever outlasting a proper port-injected one, and I've owned both. My Cooper Turbo DI was a trainwreck.
I have higher hopes for PDI (Port and Direct Injection) like Toyota's D-4S or Ford's 2018+ 3.3L, 2.7L, and 5.0L engines. Yeah you have twice as many fuel injectors and a HPFP, but the low-speed MPFI should alleviate the valve carbonizing problem.
 

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Sure, because a couple dudes visually looking at used motor oil is totally a legit substitute for oil analysis.

“Looked okay.”

Totally legit.


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I mean at some point it's all anecdotal. I suppose science didn't exist until someone had an analysis machine. The most important feature/function/process of any science is observation.
 
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