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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
My 12v on the dash doesn't work. The one in the console doesn't have power unless the key is on. I'm rewireing the plug but I need a always hot wire under the dash to tap into. Or is there a good spot to go through the fire wall and i can wire it to the battery with a inline fuse?
2008 Nissan Frontier 4x2 cc le

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Good thing you included the year and model of truck. Oh - you didn't, that makes it easier.

Likely a fuse labeled "cigar" or "room" burned out.

Or use a voltmeter or DC test light at the fuse box, find an always-hot circuit like the dome light, and run a new wire with an in-line fuse. Or run new wire through an existing firewall grommet from the battery, also with in-line fuse.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Good thing you included the year and model of truck. Oh - you didn't, that makes it easier.

Likely a fuse labeled "cigar" or "room" burned out.

Or use a voltmeter or DC test light at the fuse box, find an always-hot circuit like the dome light, and run a new wire with an in-line fuse. Or run new wire through an existing firewall grommet from the battery, also with in-line fuse.


Edited my post with my truck info on it. I'm sorry if I pushed you "be a a** button" because I forgot to put my truck info on it. Cigar fuse is not burnt.


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Cusser - "Please include the year and model of your truck so we can help you better" would have been sufficient.
 
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I will take a stab at answering your question... My answer is the same regardless of when your truck was assembled.

The best (and recommended) way to do this is bring a separate fused connection from the battery. Given all the aftermarket amplifier wiring kits available, gathering the parts is not a problem. it is easy to bring the wire through various existing grommets on the firewall depending on where you need it. I would recommend a terminal block somewhere easy to add additional circuits if needed in the future.

The reason I would NOT tap an existing connection is that most of those circuits inside the cab are low power. Mostly to keep memory in radios, computers, etc, when the truck is turned off. A typical Cigarette lighter is setup for 10 amps. You might get away with it for a cell phone charger, but plug in a small invertor or tire pump and you will probably blow a fuse. (and lose the memory from whatever device it was connected to).

Sounds like a lot more work, but doing it right to start with might save you a headache later...
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Looking into the terminal block. Looks like it would keep everything clean. Do y'all run one hot from the battery to the block then jump it to all spots on one side of the block, then run out of the block to what your wiring. Or do y'all run a individual wire from the battery to each spot on the block. Say the block has 4 spots do I run 4 wires to the block from the battery?


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I brought a single 4 gauge wire into two 30 amp fuses under the hood (one 8 gauge into the into the cab to a terminal block, the other 8 gauge under the hood for lighting up front. Inside the cab, I split off through another fuse block (6 fuses, in my case) to individual items that need power. If I need to work on any of it, I just pull the 30A fuse feeding the cab. If something shorts inside, one of the 6 fuses will blow.

I have some high power amateur radio equipment, so the capacity might be overkill for your needs. One power wire should be sufficient unless you are running winches and/or large inverters...



 

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All youre trying to do is to get constant power to the 12v outlet in the center stack, correct? If so, then what about running an 'add-a-circuit'??

Basically, all you do is get a multi-meter & check the fuse block inside the cab for a constant hot 20 amp circuit. Once you find one you insert the 'add-a-circuit' to that slot, run your wire behind the glove boxes & over to the center stack, then connect it to the outlet. There's several places behind the center stack that you can attach a ground wire to as well.

If you're looking to power other stuff besides just the power outlet, then yes, its best to run a wire directly from the battery with some sort of inline circuit breaker or fuse so as to be able to cut the flow off to your power block.
 

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All youre trying to do is to get constant power to the 12v outlet in the center stack, correct? If so, then what about running an 'add-a-circuit'??

Basically, all you do is get a multi-meter & check the fuse block inside the cab for a constant hot 20 amp circuit. Once you find one you insert the 'add-a-circuit' to that slot, run your wire behind the glove boxes & over to the center stack, then connect it to the outlet. There's several places behind the center stack that you can attach a ground wire to as well.

If you're looking to power other stuff besides just the power outlet, then yes, its best to run a wire directly from the battery with some sort of inline circuit breaker or fuse so as to be able to cut the flow off to your power block.
I really dislike the "add-a-circuit", and this is my reason why:
If you clip onto the 'fused' side of the circuit, then you are drawing more power through the fuse than designed and more likely to pop it. If all you're powering is a 20 yr old stereo or a phone charger or dash-mount gps (all low-draw items) then you probably won't blow anything, BUT...
If you clip into the un-fused side, then you're STILL drawing more power than the feedline of the circuit is sized for AND if you've tapped in to the feedline side its likely because you popped the OEM fuse when tied into the fused side, which means its only a matter of time before you overdraw the wire itself and it will burn up.... Then you'll have a build page like Nomad...

My question is why/what do you need powered all the time (when the vehicle's not running)?

OEMs have set power ports to be key-on to keep unwitting owners from killing their batteries. Personally, I prefer the powerports to be key-on...
 

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My 2010 had the power always on to the power port and I could leave the phone on charge when needed and didn't have to leave the key on I miss that choice.
In my Challenger the power port fuse has two positions, first is on with the key and second is move the fuse over the second position and it turns to always hot. If only Nissan offered us this option.

Clint
 

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Discussion Starter #11 (Edited)
I really dislike the "add-a-circuit", and this is my reason why:

If you clip onto the 'fused' side of the circuit, then you are drawing more power through the fuse than designed and more likely to pop it. If all you're powering is a 20 yr old stereo or a phone charger or dash-mount gps (all low-draw items) then you probably won't blow anything, BUT...

If you clip into the un-fused side, then you're STILL drawing more power than the feedline of the circuit is sized for AND if you've tapped in to the feedline side its likely because you popped the OEM fuse when tied into the fused side, which means its only a matter of time before you overdraw the wire itself and it will burn up.... Then you'll have a build page like Nomad...



My question is why/what do you need powered all the time (when the vehicle's not running)?



OEMs have set power ports to be key-on to keep unwitting owners from killing their batteries. Personally, I prefer the powerports to be key-on...


I want to be able to charge my phone and not run my truck. Mainly when I'm at the deer lease. I'm just going to run it to my battery and put a inline fuse on it.


2008
 

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I want to be able to charge my phone and not run my truck. Mainly when I'm at the deer lease.
Ahh, for maybe a 1A draw, an add-a-fuse would be ok. The benefit to a separate power leg is the addition later on for more power needs. An 8 guage wire should support at least 50A total draw, I have to find my amperage->gauge chart to doublecheck...
 

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Hey mtyler,

Guess Im a little confused by your reply about you not liking the 'add-a-circuit' I mentioned. The one I used in my auxiliary power system install is double fused & doesn't "clip" to any part of the wire whether it be upstream or downstream of the fuse. Rather, the type I used installs directly into the fuse panel. Basically, its pick an existing circuit with the correct power rating, pull the fuse, add the new 'circuit', install an appropriate sized fuse for the new circuit, then extend the wire as needed. Heres a pic of it;


I used this as a switched power source to activate the relays in my auxiliary power system whenever I flip one of the switches. It has the stock fuse on one side & I think a 2.5 or maybe 3 amp fuse on the other. As I'm sure you know, it doesn't take hardly any power at all to activate the solenoid inside of a relay.



Is this the same thing you were saying that you didn't like? Or are you talking about a different type that uses 't-taps' or something to attach to the power source?
 

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I brought a single 4 gauge wire into two 30 amp fuses under the hood (one 8 gauge into the into the cab to a terminal block, the other 8 gauge under the hood for lighting up front. Inside the cab, I split off through another fuse block (6 fuses, in my case) to individual items that need power. If I need to work on any of it, I just pull the 30A fuse feeding the cab. If something shorts inside, one of the 6 fuses will blow.
I've got almost the same setup as geek, heavy duty straight off the battery, fused within inches of the source, running into the cab into a fuse block where the "need constant power at all times" items are fused again on smaller fuses matching the needs of each draw. Power (cigarette lighter) plugs, lighting, CB etc, everything else is run through a relay and then fused before powering the device. Clean, easy to maintain, safe and highly recommend this method. Also provides the ability to add on later easily if desired...
 

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For this mod, I used a large green wire located inside the left foot kick panel in the driver's foot compartment. See my album here. Second pic.
 
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