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2015 Nissan Frontier SV Crew Cab LWB 4x4
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So I'm reading through a lot of the information on here, and I want to clarify that I'm thinking correctly. I have a '15 SV 4x4, completely stock suspension.

  • The front end unloaded droop is limited by the maximum extension of the shock/dampener.
  • The front end maximum compression is limited by the bump-stop. The shock/dampener itself could compress further, but the bump-stop prevents this.
  • Likewise the bump-stop prevents coil-bind, the coil spring never compresses to its maximum because the bump-stop limits travel.
  • When one takes steps of one's choosing to increase droop, there's a risk of exceeding a ball joint angle, where instead of the shock/dampener limiting travel, the ball binding on the cup of the balljoint does, which of course puts excessive force on this point.
  • Other parts, such as CV shafts, might also be stressed further if droop is increased.
  • Another limiting factor on droop is the upper control arm drooping to where it contacts the coil bucket attached to the frame.

Are my assumptions correct?

If so, it sounds like one could increase travel, slightly, by ensuring that the top stud on the shock/dampener doesn't protrude as high out of the top-plate. This would move the shaft of the shock/dampener downwards the distance of the thickness of the shim, resulting in mathematically corresponding droop based on the moment-arm of the control arms at the steering knuckle. This would not particularly affect ride height, which is determined by the spring where it attaches to the body of the shock, and the distance from that point to the eye at the bottom of the shock remaining the same.
 

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There is truth in your theory but will gain you very little travel/droop.
Better,smarter ways to accomplish but a lot ,ore expensive.
 

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So I'm reading through a lot of the information on here, and I want to clarify that I'm thinking correctly. I have a '15 SV 4x4, completely stock suspension.

  • The front end unloaded droop is limited by the maximum extension of the shock/dampener.
  • The front end maximum compression is limited by the bump-stop. The shock/dampener itself could compress further, but the bump-stop prevents this.
  • Likewise the bump-stop prevents coil-bind, the coil spring never compresses to its maximum because the bump-stop limits travel.
  • When one takes steps of one's choosing to increase droop, there's a risk of exceeding a ball joint angle, where instead of the shock/dampener limiting travel, the ball binding on the cup of the balljoint does, which of course puts excessive force on this point.
  • Other parts, such as CV shafts, might also be stressed further if droop is increased.
  • Another limiting factor on droop is the upper control arm drooping to where it contacts the coil bucket attached to the frame.

Are my assumptions correct?

If so, it sounds like one could increase travel, slightly, by ensuring that the top stud on the shock/dampener doesn't protrude as high out of the top-plate. This would move the shaft of the shock/dampener downwards the distance of the thickness of the shim, resulting in mathematically corresponding droop based on the moment-arm of the control arms at the steering knuckle. This would not particularly affect ride height, which is determined by the spring where it attaches to the body of the shock, and the distance from that point to the eye at the bottom of the shock remaining the same.
Get longer ,better fitting shocks.
Coil bind is not max compression,way beyond!
Depending on lift, beyond 2,5 lift, you have no droop.
Coil bucket contact?
Going to happen.
Kick the buckets out,
Hoop.
Cv angle? Longer arms,axles,tie rods,etc
 

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2015 Nissan Frontier SV Crew Cab LWB 4x4
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Discussion Starter · #4 · (Edited)
The principal reason for asking was if the right selection of shock would come with otherwise-free gains, and if the right selection of coil spring would likewise come with benefits.

I'm not looking to re-engineer the entire suspension system or to titan-swap. I'm mainly looking to get a little advantage out of what Nissan otherwise decently designed for multipurpose. To me that's maintaining the factory LCAs, factory-dimensioned CV shafts, factory-dimensioned UCAs. Comparatively minor changes in shocks, either alternate shocks or else shifting the start-point at the top down by placing an extra nut on the stud prior to assembling the strut, choice of coil spring, and possibly some kind of spacer at the top depending.

A little additional ride height, a little additional travel/articulation/flex Nothing dramatic. I am going to go through some of JeniorNV's posts and others too, but wanted to confirm the nature of the original issues as they are from the factory.

EDIT: and of course, this is based on the extra weight I've added to the truck in the form of the front winch mount and the winch when it's slotted in. Recovering 3/4" to 1".
 

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My truck serves only to desert rsce.
Well, will maybe chase pre run.
Multi purpose multi mediocre!
No increase in travel with stock arms.
 

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You may pick up here and there for a very limited amount of increase in travel but a very insufficient worth not worth the trouble.
Plus, you lose an inch if you strap and bump.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Alright, revisiting this yet again.

I reread PrerunnerGreg's stickied 2013 post and a couple pages of replies, and I've read JeniorNV's posts on lifts.

In a nutshell we bought a travel trailer, and I picked up some add-a-leafs for the back. I'm going to try out how the truck sits with them installed, but I expect unloaded I'll have a fair amount of additional lift in back. Front already sits too low in stock format for my tastes, so I'm mulling what changes will help make the truck ride closer to level, and still not droop in the back when loaded up, while improving off-pavement performance.

I'm now leaning towards some kind of aftermarket UCA to increase droop without coil-bucket contact, either a height-adjustable shock or a small spacer, and possibly either V8 Pathfinder coils or an aftermarket coil that's just a little taller to start with. I'm not looking for radical changes. I'm sort of leaning towards the SPC-type UCAs because of the replacable and alignable balljoint, along with camber bolts for the LCA.

I know that with the antisway bar I won't gain full articulation, but that'll have to be revisited in another fashion. One possible idea, Skyjacker makes a three-piece front swaybar for the Jeep TJ that uses a hub locker on one side to disconnect that side from the bar, it's manually operated and gives me ideas.

Does this sound like a reasonable approach?
 

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I guess air bags keep popping in my head !
Have them on my Dodge and did not change anything since it works so well.
Bags work great when I have to tow.
 

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You do not want a talle springr, although it may work .
I have tried that.
Better is the correct spring rate to control ride height.
 
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