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I found some Jbl 6x9 3 way speakers, model GX963 that are 2.3 ohm. Very close to our stock system. Cost is about $80 a pr.
Has anyone heard these? Any experience with this brand? I'm just looking for some increase in sound quality. Not looking to shake the truck or have everyone around me here what I'm listening to.
Thanks for your input.
 

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Even a $29.99 pair of regular 4-ohm Pioneer 6x9’s will probably give you the same marginal “increase in sound quality”. The OEM head unit is the first problem to address to gain actual sound improvement.
 

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I tried a pr of 4ohm speakers in my 06 and volume was so poor I put the oe,s back in. I fully understand that doubling the resistance, you cut power in half. It's tough to find 2ohm speakers. I know the head unit is initial problem, bit oe is good enough for now. I've also thought about installing a small amp with the jbl, s.
Thanks for reply raine.
 

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Yeah... if anything, whenever you add better speakers to a bad source, the only improvement you’ll get is that it will be easier to hear how bad the source really is haha
 

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JBL's are my brand of choice IF they say "made in Japan." Ive got some mid 70's Studio Monitors that will knock the pictures off the wall and put knick knacks from the shelves on the floor.


However, if they say "made in China" they are no better then anyone else's, shop by price.
 

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I tried a pr of 4ohm speakers in my 06 and volume was so poor I put the oe,s back in. I fully understand that doubling the resistance, you cut power in half. It's tough to find 2ohm speakers. I know the head unit is initial problem, bit oe is good enough for now. I've also thought about installing a small amp with the jbl, s.
Thanks for reply raine.
I found some Jbl 6x9 3 way speakers, model GX963 that are 2.3 ohm. Very close to our stock system. Cost is about $80 a pr.
Has anyone heard these? Any experience with this brand? I'm just looking for some increase in sound quality. Not looking to shake the truck or have everyone around me here what I'm listening to.
Thanks for your input.
hi,dark night did you install jbl spk, if so how did it work out for you?. thanks.
 

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I've had JBL speakers, home theater & mobile. They are both quality units and gave me good service. But as Finally said above, don't get their cheapie offering.
 

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Our 6x9's in the front door are rated at 2 ohms, this is true. However, we do not know their efficiency. If, and its just a guess, we assume that their efficiency is very average, we might guess that they have an SPL of, oh, let's say 88 dB. If we choose to replace with a 4 ohm speaker with an SPL rating of 88 db, then we can expect 3 dB less volume (which is not a big change). If we want to use a 4 ohm speaker and suffer no change in volume, all we have to do is use one with a 3dB higher SPL rating, or 91 dB.

Do not confuse the two "sensitivity" specs that we see on speakers. The SPL rating is with the speaker absorbing 1 watt of power. The other rating, where 2.83 volts is presented to the speaker is not the same as SPL unless you are testing 8 ohm speakers. For a 4 ohm speaker, theoretically, the 2.83 volt sensitivity should be 3 dB greater than the SPL rating because 2.83 volts across 4 ohms is 2 watts, not 1 watt. If an SPL (1w at 1m) is given, it doesn't matter what the impedance is. If a 2.83 volt spec is given, then it does matter and you have to make the adjustment to compare to an SPL rated speaker.

The Rockford Fosgate system has a 4 ohm 2 inch tweeter in the dash, and a 2 ohm 6x9 mid-woofer in the door. This means that they do not expect the dash tweeter to accept half the power (at higher frequencies. I am ignoring the capacitor cross over for the time being), so if you put a 4 ohm speaker in place of the 2 ohm unit in the door, and your replacement has exactly the same efficiency as the one you replaced, then we can expect the balance between door speaker and dash speaker to be upset in favor of more volume from the dash speaker. Several members have described exactly this happening, and it is not a good change. If you choose a 4 ohm door speaker that is 3 dB more efficient than the stock one, then we can expect that the balance is not upset. So, in this way, I think you can expect a good result with the right choice of 4 ohm door speaker rather than searching in vain for the right 2 ohm speaker. It is unfortunate that we have to guess what our efficiency target should be. I have read one poster who claims a good result with a Hertz speaker with 95 dB SPL efficiency (which is an outstandingly high number). Perhaps anything above 93 might be acceptable, I'm not sure.

There is another way to balance the door speaker with the dash speaker. While it is not efficient, it may be useful for those who don't listen at the highest volume levels. Simply install a resistor in series with the dash speaker to raise its apparent impedance and you can tune the balance by adjusting this resistance. If it were me, I would start with resistance suitable to drop the dash volume by 3 dB which might be a 1.68 ohm resistor, with a power rating of 5 watts. That's a chunky component so tie it down with a tie-wrap or something. Regrettably the resistor is burning up some of your valuable power, but I bet you have plenty.
 

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Our 6x9's in the front door are rated at 2 ohms, this is true. However, we do not know their efficiency. If, and its just a guess, we assume that their efficiency is very average, we might guess that they have an SPL of, oh, let's say 88 dB. If we choose to replace with a 4 ohm speaker with an SPL rating of 88 db, then we can expect 3 dB less volume (which is not a big change). If we want to use a 4 ohm speaker and suffer no change in volume, all we have to do is use one with a 3dB higher SPL rating, or 91 dB.

Do not confuse the two "sensitivity" specs that we see on speakers. The SPL rating is with the speaker absorbing 1 watt of power. The other rating, where 2.83 volts is presented to the speaker is not the same as SPL unless you are testing 8 ohm speakers. For a 4 ohm speaker, theoretically, the 2.83 volt sensitivity should be 3 dB greater than the SPL rating because 2.83 volts across 4 ohms is 2 watts, not 1 watt. If an SPL (1w at 1m) is given, it doesn't matter what the impedance is. If a 2.83 volt spec is given, then it does matter and you have to make the adjustment to compare to an SPL rated speaker.

The Rockford Fosgate system has a 4 ohm 2 inch tweeter in the dash, and a 2 ohm 6x9 mid-woofer in the door. This means that they do not expect the dash tweeter to accept half the power (at higher frequencies. I am ignoring the capacitor cross over for the time being), so if you put a 4 ohm speaker in place of the 2 ohm unit in the door, and your replacement has exactly the same efficiency as the one you replaced, then we can expect the balance between door speaker and dash speaker to be upset in favor of more volume from the dash speaker. Several members have described exactly this happening, and it is not a good change. If you choose a 4 ohm door speaker that is 3 dB more efficient than the stock one, then we can expect that the balance is not upset. So, in this way, I think you can expect a good result with the right choice of 4 ohm door speaker rather than searching in vain for the right 2 ohm speaker. It is unfortunate that we have to guess what our efficiency target should be. I have read one poster who claims a good result with a Hertz speaker with 95 dB SPL efficiency (which is an outstandingly high number). Perhaps anything above 93 might be acceptable, I'm not sure.

There is another way to balance the door speaker with the dash speaker. While it is not efficient, it may be useful for those who don't listen at the highest volume levels. Simply install a resistor in series with the dash speaker to raise its apparent impedance and you can tune the balance by adjusting this resistance. If it were me, I would start with resistance suitable to drop the dash volume by 3 dB which might be a 1.68 ohm resistor, with a power rating of 5 watts. That's a chunky component so tie it down with a tie-wrap or something. Regrettably the resistor is burning up some of your valuable power, but I bet you have plenty.
LOL

OR don't overthink it.

BTW 3dB is a noticeable change. And the OEM audio (even the RF systems) suffer from having a bad source, regardless of 2 or 4 ohm OEM or aftermarket filtered or not.
 
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