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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So I kept getting a p0174 code on my 04 v6 when taking longer drives.

My mileage was bad, power seemed lacking, rough idle at times.

My shop said o2 sensor was to blame, so I looked into it a bit, and found the part change to be pretty easy to do in the engine, not so easy neat the "cat".

I was told it was one of the harder onces to install, and one of the more expensive ones.

I trust them, so I just bit the bullet and threw down what ended up being 320$ to get it done.

Now I see on the bill "o2 sensor 18002 front one" and the aftermarket part cost 255$

I cant find a place that sells one online for that much if I try, most are way less.

Am I being paranoid? I have a long history with these guys, I dig them, but MAYBE I am a big dummy?
 

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Well, they need to make some margin on the parts.

And my feeling is you are always better going with genuine OEM sensors, which do cost more than non-Nissan parts.
 

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$320 seems very cheap to have your issue resolved. If you are not willing to wrench on your own car then you have to pay. Remember you are also paying for them to figure out what is wrong with your car not just buy and swap out parts. I have heard that job costing over $1K.
 

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I don't believe you are being ripped off. If the part itself costs 255 and they're claiming it's the front O2. I'd gather that it's actually the air/fuel ratio sensor. That's just a guess. Straight math suggests that's only a $65/hour shop rate. That's pretty good in my opinion. They may have gotten the sensor at a bit more of a discount then they charged but it's fair overall I think.
 

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$320 seems very cheap to have your issue resolved. If you are not willing to wrench on your own car then you have to pay. Remember you are also paying for them to figure out what is wrong with your car not just buy and swap out parts. I have heard that job costing over $1K.
That is so true. You are paying for their skill and knowledge. How long would it take for you to figure out the problem?
Reminds me when I was working. A few engineers would watch me machine a part and would say ”that looks easy!”.
I would just say to myself “ it is easy!,after you go to trade school for 2.5 years,Serve a 4 year apprenticeship and add about 10 years more of experience”.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Thanks for the responses guys!

I have no issue paying for their expertise, its just the way it was itemized on the bill. I see a part 100$ more than I could buy it off the net and hand it to them, I feel like I gotta ask some questions at the least.

Now I feel bad! I do appreciate those guys, and they did nail it, my new old truck just drove my kid 45mins back to her school beautifully. Got power back, and my mileage was much better. So I am indeed happy to know 300$ is a fair price.

Thanks again.
 

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That is so true. You are paying for their skill and knowledge. How long would it take for you to figure out the problem?
Reminds me when I was working. A few engineers would watch me machine a part and would say ”that looks easy!”.
I would just say to myself “ it is easy!,after you go to trade school for 2.5 years,Serve a 4 year apprenticeship and add about 10 years more of experience”.
That is funny. At a past job I use to send my drawing to the machine shop and since I was one of the younger guys they would throw my drawing at the bottom of the pile. Sometime continuously putting newer drawing above mine. Seeing that most of the machines were empty I asked if I could jump on a mill and cut my own parts. They said sure. Didn't even check me out on the machines. Maybe they just trusted me, but I think they were hoping that I broke something major and added some excitement to the shop. After working on my part for maybe 1/2 hour or so some of the machinist would come by and check out what I was making. I would generally get nods of approvement for which I would always ask of tips in return. When asked how I learned to machine I would then tell them that I ran the student machine shop at school for about 2 years. Taught hundreds of other students how to machine and weld. I gained a lot of credibility/respect with those guys. As a result when I submitted parts to be cut in the future I was the one that got his drawing put on the top of the pile.
 

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You are paying for their skill and knowledge.
That reminds me of something that happened at work, at the R&D lab, about 3 decades ago. The CEO was there, getting a tour. We were stationed at various lab instruments, in case the CEO wanted to ask questions. As he was heading to our aisle, one of the other department managers told CEO that we had "a machine" that could do amazing things and operate 24/7 without an operator. So the CEO wanted to see this "incredible machine" (for those interested, was a gas chromatograph interfaced with a mass spectrometer), and was led over by his entourage and he asked me if this could deliver answers and operate 24/7 by itself without an analytical scientist. That rubbed me the wrong way, and I told CEO that it would as if he had Jack Nicklaus' golf clubs in his hands, that he wouldn't have the skill, experience, or the knowledge to shoot the same golf scores as Jack Nicklaus. Co-workers thought I was going to be fired !!!
 

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I was the instructor for our first year apprentices.
They had to serve four years while attending classes at our local community college.
Once they completed their apprenticeship and got their 2 year degree they became “A” machinist or general machinist.
Minimum 10 years before you became an “ “experimental machinist”. Some never attain that rating.
When I started (early seventies) , you had to be proficient in small and large mills, same with lathes and jig bores.Planers, shapers. Tracer lathes and mills. EDM, wire and plunge.
Tool grinding. That is why it took so long.
I have seen so called experimental machinist from other companies downgraded down to machine operators and eventually laid off.
We had a joint venture with Boeing on the “Airborne Lazer” project(chemical Lazer mounted in a 747).
Their people were so bad, we had a two vans bringing parts back, fixing them and returning them( Redondo Beach to Palmdale.
I watched new hires let go by lunch.
A machinist that worked for the company 12 years was let go for making mistakes.
You got me started.
I use to say “I am just an average TRW machinist”. Which I am not ashamed to say I was very proud!
 

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That reminds me of something that happened at work, at the R&D lab, about 3 decades ago. The CEO was there, getting a tour. We were stationed at various lab instruments, in case the CEO wanted to ask questions. As he was heading to our aisle, one of the other department managers told CEO that we had "a machine" that could do amazing things and operate 24/7 without an operator. So the CEO wanted to see this "incredible machine" (for those interested, was a gas chromatograph interfaced with a mass spectrometer), and was led over by his entourage and he asked me if this could deliver answers and operate 24/7 by itself without an analytical scientist. That rubbed me the wrong way, and I told CEO that it would as if he had Jack Nicklaus' golf clubs in his hands, that he wouldn't have the skill, experience, or the knowledge to shoot the same golf scores as Jack Nicklaus. Co-workers thought I was going to be fired !!!
I worked special projects. One of the skill we needed was designing and forming .141 co axial cable.The lengths needed to be equal. Problem is that the distances between connectors were different.We would start off by bending aluminum welding wire, eventually the .141 cable. It would be sent to the cable lab where it would be copied and the flight cable would be made. Very time consuming.One of the big bosses came by and saw what we were doing.
He said that they had spent a fortune on a CNC cable maker.
We told him that we knew nothing about that.
He got our boss and went to the cable lab.
Later our boss told us when the big boss asked about the machine, one of the workers said “ you mean that” pointing to the machine under a tarp.“We never use it, it doesn’t work”.
Just to let you know I had a NASA soldering certification.
If you need any spacecraft parts soldered , I am your man. Lol
 

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Just to let you know I had a NASA soldering certification.
If you need any spacecraft parts soldered , I am your man. Lol
I would trust your work. But I'm afraid to fly.
 

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I do most of my own stuff, but I do have a guy when it's something out of my league, and he wasn't easy to find. He works with my parts and just charges me an hourly rate. The one drawback is he doesn't warranty the parts, if I have to change a part because it failed, I pay again, it's never happened, yet. He does charge me $10 over his shop rate, because he doesn't make anything off of the parts. Works for both of us.
 
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