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2017 CC SV 4x4
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Discussion Starter #1
I’d like to add a push bar to my truck since my commute takes me over a mountain where I have yet to go more than 3 work days without stopping for deer or seeing them directly on the side of the road.
I came across this 2000 or 2001 xterra push bar for 75 bucks and that’s a heck of a lot better than 2-400 for a new one, but obviously I need to conscious of fitment. Is retro fitting other trucks’ push bars possible or do I need to just suck it up and wait for a gen 2 to show up/buy brand new. Thanks!
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2004 Nissan Frontier XE KC KA24DE
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That won't do anything except give way and cause more body damage when it bends into the truck body.

A Shrockworks or another similar type bumper would be the only way to truly have deer protection.
 

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I concur with butterman2473.
 
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Discussion Starter #4
Guess I better start saving lol there are more things that I want to do for my truck than money I have. It’s tough!
 

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Guess I better start saving lol there are more things that I want to do for my truck than money I have. It’s tough!
I feel ya.
I've wanted some deer protection for quite some time now and have yet to do so.
 

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If I were specifically looking for protection against moderately heavy wildlife I'd probably go ARB. Unfortunately you'll pay fairly heavily for their product.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
If I were specifically looking for protection against moderately heavy wildlife I'd probably go ARB. Unfortunately you'll pay fairly heavily for their product.
That’s what I was worried about, I’ve got more non-negotiables to take care of first, brakes and rotors, mild paint correction, spark plugs, etc that will need done over the next couple months, so deer protection/off-road bumper will probably have to wait!
 

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That brushguard mounting point is not the same as the 2nd gen frame, even if it were wide enough.
For animal protection you want a steel bumper. A few yrs back there was a pic here of a deer or moose strike with a Heftyfab Aluminum bumper. It held up fairly well, prevented much worse damage, but was Done after the strike. And chris doesn't do the grillguard style.
Shrockworks may still do their bumper with a full guard, and its steel construction.
And you have arb.
Ive seen an arb take a serious strike. Buddy with a taco had a car accident (car ran redlight) the car was toast. Bumper... scratched. However the arb frame mounts, designed to deform, were bent and the taco frame was also tweaked. Insurance totaled it.
My point here is in an accident something has to give. A deer will probably bounce off of a good bumper, and arb is designed for animal strikes, bug dont think its a silver bullet...
 

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That brushguard mounting point is not the same as the 2nd gen frame, even if it were wide enough.
For animal protection you want a steel bumper. A few yrs back there was a pic here of a deer or moose strike with a Heftyfab Aluminum bumper. It held up fairly well, prevented much worse damage, but was Done after the strike. And chris doesn't do the grillguard style.
Shrockworks may still do their bumper with a full guard, and its steel construction.
And you have arb.
Ive seen an arb take a serious strike. Buddy with a taco had a car accident (car ran redlight) the car was toast. Bumper... scratched. However the arb frame mounts, designed to deform, were bent and the taco frame was also tweaked. Insurance totaled it.
My point here is in an accident something has to give. A deer will probably bounce off of a good bumper, and arb is designed for animal strikes, bug dont think its a silver bullet...
Personally I'd rather the bumper be destroyed than the truck.

In an ideal world my truck would've shipped with an SL/Limited style front clip, with the flexible/plastic upper valence under the headlights and grille and attached at the fenders, and with a chrome front bumper. In my particular circumstances I'd wish to replace that chrome bumper with something aluminum, something lighter, stronger than the OE part, but still able to yield in a wreck, with that plastic upper valence being able to deform and take up the travel of the aluminum bumper to minimize damage to the steel fenders, hood, various radiator supports, etc. I might even want the front crossmember, which acts as the structural bumper, to be aluminum.

Come to think of it, I may see what other vehicles have similar front contours to the Frontier, because with my concealed front hitch I've got more steel up there than I really need now. Swapping that part for an aluminum part would work in my application since the hitch I built would handle the really bad hits.
 

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Guess I better start saving lol there are more things that I want to do for my truck than money I have. It’s tough!
Your money is going to be better spent calling your agent and seeing how much more a lower deductible will cost you. I have a $200 deductible, so at worst, A deer smokes my truck, I pay $200 and I have a new truck and $200 worth of venison in my freezer.....
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Your money is going to be better spent calling your agent and seeing how much more a lower deductible will cost you. I have a $200 deductible, so at worst, A deer smokes my truck, I pay $200 and I have a new truck and $200 worth of venison in my freezer.....
I did look at that possibility but the difference between my deductible and a lower deductible around 200$ changed my premium in a way that wasn’t really proportional. I just set a little money aside each month into my “warranty” fund. Every time I purchase something and a warranty is offered, say 10 or 15 bucks a month or something, I turn down the warranty and set that money aside myself as if I had purchased the warranty
 

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I did look at that possibility but the difference between my deductible and a lower deductible around 200$ changed my premium in a way that wasn’t really proportional. I just set a little money aside each month into my “warranty” fund. Every time I purchase something and a warranty is offered, say 10 or 15 bucks a month or something, I turn down the warranty and set that money aside myself as if I had purchased the warranty
I review that each time my policy comes up. I have my agent run a few different deductibles. Sometimes it adds up properly, sometimes not.
 

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Personally I'd rather the bumper be destroyed than the truck.

In an ideal world my truck would've shipped with an SL/Limited style front clip, with the flexible/plastic upper valence under the headlights and grille and attached at the fenders, and with a chrome front bumper. In my particular circumstances I'd wish to replace that chrome bumper with something aluminum, something lighter, stronger than the OE part, but still able to yield in a wreck, with that plastic upper valence being able to deform and take up the travel of the aluminum bumper to minimize damage to the steel fenders, hood, various radiator supports, etc. I might even want the front crossmember, which acts as the structural bumper, to be aluminum.

Come to think of it, I may see what other vehicles have similar front contours to the Frontier, because with my concealed front hitch I've got more steel up there than I really need now. Swapping that part for an aluminum part would work in my application since the hitch I built would handle the really bad hits.
I understand what youre saying, but in a light crash, say an animal strike, a sturdy bumper will save fenders, lights, mouldings... and a heavy crash, car on car, Anything will defirm the front frame.
This is what i like about the arb. The frame mounts are designed to deform in a light to medium impact without deforming the frame.
Don't get me wrong. I love my Hefty aluminum bumper. I just have no illusions that it would prevent damage in a strike. Its there for clearance and winch and shackle attachment. Its nudged a few trees and rocks with no deformation, but i know a good solid hit will do something to it.
 

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I understand what youre saying, but in a light crash, say an animal strike, a sturdy bumper will save fenders, lights, mouldings... and a heavy crash, car on car, Anything will defirm the front frame.
This is what i like about the arb. The frame mounts are designed to deform in a light to medium impact without deforming the frame.
Don't get me wrong. I love my Hefty aluminum bumper. I just have no illusions that it would prevent damage in a strike. Its there for clearance and winch and shackle attachment. Its nudged a few trees and rocks with no deformation, but i know a good solid hit will do something to it.
I guess what I'm saying, is that in the course of the design, I want the absorbing-mounts to be the weakest point, then the bumper itself, then the truck frame.

In a mild accident up to perhaps a 150lb animal at highway speed, the absorbing mounts take the hit. the bumper's position on the vehicle shifts accordingly, the plastic upper valence keeps the shifted bumper off of the body sheet metal.

In a moderate accident, say a large animal, the absorbing mounts take the hit, but the bumper itself gets deformed. The plastic upper valence may get pushed on, but hopefully the damage to sheet metal is negligible to nonexistent and the frame is fine.

In a vehicle-on-vehicle accident, car-on-car, the mounting and bumper are obviously toast, and possibly metal on thte vehicle is too, but only after the mounting and bumper have absorbed. Whether ther vehicle remains viably repaired or ends up a writeoff depends on the severity of the accident, but I'd still rather the bumper die in service of protecting the frame than the bumper come through without a scratch.

A bumper that comes through unscathed is too strong, it means the energy of the crash is being aborbed by the rest of the vehicle, not by the bumper. Obviously each and every crash is different, but good engineering should look at relative yield strength and attempt to balance this accordingly.
 
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