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Discussion Starter #1
I bought this truck last year in may. I got it because i was looking for a truck after I totaled my Chevy Silverado. I am in high school and this is the first truck I’m using my own money on for parts, upgrades, gas, oil, insurance and registration. Before I head off to college in the fall I plan to add an air spring in the back (bought but not installed), a 3 inch lift kit on top of my 2 inch body lift. LT tires instead of P tires, new drivetrain (engine leaking oil), engine, transmission, transfer case( already bought) and driveshaft. (Also knocking light rust off the bottom) I find it cheaper to fix my truck than buying a new one that I can’t afford. I plan on putting 250,000 more miles on it (currently has 200,000). If is great for work I have hauled my mower, yard waste, mulch, wood, metal, and many other things. I use the bed on an almost daily basis. It’s definitely not fast, and the gas mileage sucks but it’s a truck, what do u expect? Only thing I haven’t done yet is pull a trailer or off-road with it yet. It has done everything I’ve needed it to do.
 

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Sounds like a good plan. I take mine four-wheeling and it does great. I’d stay away from LT tires. You won’t increase load or towing capacity, because there are other weak links. All you’ll do is make it ride harshly. The passenger tires are nice and soft and squishy, makes for a pleasant drive. Your truck though, you do what’s right for you; I just like to give advice


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Until you start making real money.............lol
He's just starting his life as an adult - let's lay off the prejudice for now

I mean this is the only job at my age I can make $350-400 a week
No need to explain, most of us have been there. Keep doing what you are doing, good things come to those that work for them. Enjoy your truck, I've been fixing mine now for 13 years and plan on keeping it going for a few more yet
 

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It's always cheaper to fix your vehicle than make years of payments on another.
 

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2004 Nissan Frontier XE KC KA24DE
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I mean this is the only job at my age I can make $350-400 a week
You're on the right track. I have more respect for a person that works hard for what they have, no matter their income, as opposed to someone that doesn't work and/or prefers to mooch or scam their way through life.
 

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Not a bad plan. A friend of mine still has his 1990 Toyota Pickup that he bought when we were in high school 15 years ago.
 

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I have ZERO ZERO ZERO respect for moochers or scammers, as stated by others, it's not if you're making massive bank, it's the fact you are being a man and doing what needs doing, providing for yourself and being a productive member of society. My son, 19 and my daughter, 17 both work at a Dunkin Donuts, my son is now transitioning over to Weis food markets. Unless your dad owns the company, you're never going to be Executive Vice President at 19 years old. We all started out there too. Kudos to you.

Don't ever install P-Metric tires on a pickup, especially on a truck used for work, get an LT Load Range / rated, or D or E if going heavy loads, like a bed full of mulch. The P tires will overheat and fail.
 

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Don't ever install P-Metric tires on a pickup, especially on a truck used for work, get an LT Load Range / rated, or D or E if going heavy loads, like a bed full of mulch. The P tires will overheat and fail.
I’m going to disagree, again. The P-rated tires on these trucks are well suited to the loads encountered by these trucks. If you’re overloading your truck to the point you need LT tires, especially D or E rated tires, you need a bigger truck.

LT tires are much stiffer. They require you to fill them to a far higher pressure. Don’t be fooled. Installing an LT tire rated for 50 or 85 psi, and then inflating it to only 35, will actually create MORE heat in the tire, and it will fail.

An added point, your TPMS system may not function properly at the higher required pressure of the LT tire, you’ll get poor fuel economy, ad tires won’t last as long.

There are plenty of reasons our trucks came with P tires from the factory, and they are all good reasons.

Maybe a load B rated LT tire would be okay, but at that point why not stick with a P tire and enjoy the ride?


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Discussion Starter #13
For the tires I’m not overly concerned about ride quality, my other ride is a 1978 Jeep Cherokee me and dad work on. It has solid axles, BDS suspension parts, heavy duty springs, and LT tires. A rough ride doesn’t bother me too much. In my truck I’m going to be running a Firestone Air spring which will help with capacity and ride quality. I’m also considering LT’s because their sidewalks are a little thicker which is better for off-roading. I’m still considering the P tires because they are cheaper and it’s what came with the truck so I know they work.
 

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Not only do you Not need LT tires, more and more Tire makers dont even make their most popular All-terrain model tires with the old LT rating, they're all going with the newer SL,SH,etc rating system. Spend an hour on tirerack.
 

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I’m going to disagree, again. The P-rated tires on these trucks are well suited to the loads encountered by these trucks. If you’re overloading your truck to the point you need LT tires, especially D or E rated tires, you need a bigger truck.

LT tires are much stiffer. They require you to fill them to a far higher pressure. Don’t be fooled. Installing an LT tire rated for 50 or 85 psi, and then inflating it to only 35, will actually create MORE heat in the tire, and it will fail.

An added point, your TPMS system may not function properly at the higher required pressure of the LT tire, you’ll get poor fuel economy, ad tires won’t last as long.

There are plenty of reasons our trucks came with P tires from the factory, and they are all good reasons.

Maybe a load B rated LT tire would be okay, but at that point why not stick with a P tire and enjoy the ride?


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Not only do you Not need LT tires, more and more Tire makers dont even make their most popular All-terrain model tires with the old LT rating, they're all going with the newer SL,SH,etc rating system. Spend an hour on tirerack.
👆 I agree with both of these posts! I loaded the piss out of my truck with P metric tires and have never had a failure. Key is to keep them properly inflated and check the condition of them periodically.
 
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Adding LT tires is a mistake, even for off-roading. I’ve done a lot of offroading, my p tired have served me wonderfully. I’ve had passengers who owned bigger trucks with LT tires and hated off-roading. They’d comment how amazingly comfortable my truck rode, especially off road. You may not be concerned with ride quality at the moment, but you will be, eventually. Even for a young guy, vibration leads to fatigue. As you age, it gets much worse.

Heavier wheel/tire combinations make it much harder for your suspension to do its job. The truck will not handle as well, if you load the truck over it’s factory GVWR or GAWR and hit someone, you’re legally negligent and can face a world of trouble depending On The severity of the crash.

If you plan on doing some extreme four wheeling with your work truck, remember this; if you break it, you can’t make money with it tomorrow.

There’s literally no benefit to LT tires in this situation, when you look at the overall picture.


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“When comparing tires that are the same size/same internal static air volume but have different load ranges, one with a higher load range at higher air pressures actually may have a lower LCC. For example, a P275/65R18 can have a 2,500-pound maximum LCC at 35 psi, whereas an LT275/65R18/C (six-ply rated) might only have a 1,948-pound capacity at its maximum 50 psi. The difference: P versus LT.”

That article is all over the place, but it very clearly states LT tires are heavier, and retain more heat.


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“When comparing tires that are the same size/same internal static air volume but have different load ranges, one with a higher load range at higher air pressures actually may have a lower LCC. For example, a P275/65R18 can have a 2,500-pound maximum LCC at 35 psi, whereas an LT275/65R18/C (six-ply rated) might only have a 1,948-pound capacity at its maximum 50 psi. The difference: P versus LT.”

That article is all over the place, but it very clearly states LT tires are heavier, and retain more heat.


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Did you miss the derate values for the P-Metrics?
Car tires have no business on 5k# trucks. But it's your money and your truck. I'm going to get Load E's cause I wheel on rocky terrain in Maine and need the cut resistance and heavy carcass construction.
 
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