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Guessing Winter fuel still rules at the gas stations these days? I've had opportunities to take more rural hwys w/ speed limits from 55-65 mph lately...though mixed w/ a fair dose of regular city driving. My last three tanks were 18.53, 18.28 & 19.02. So, this is up from my 17.5-ish avg...and overall I'll speculate saving a whopping 3.5 gallons worth of fuel and maybe $7.
Wow. Party time. lol & smh & YMMV!
 

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Has anyone tried to lean out the fuel mix to get better mpg?
I did this on my Hardbody 3.0 and had great success!
I spoofed the MAF by reducing the voltage going to the CPU so it thought there was less air moving, so it sent less fuel. The result was a higher air to fuel ratio (same amount of air intake, less gasoline sprayed).
I could start from stock 14.7:1 and as I leaned it out I could feel the power surge.
I cut into a wire at the CPU which was under the pass seat.
The truck was rated at 18mpg hwy. I had slightly larger tires and could get 22mpg, and up to 23 when I put on an air dam.

I have not looked into it for the Fronty yet, just wondering who has done this.

Also, the more fillups you can calculate in the more accurate your numbers. Not all pumps are accurate, most are off a bit, and zero of them are off to give you more gas than you pump. I have seen 9/10ths of a gallon pumped for a gallon sold quite often, so this plays havoc on your calculations. I have pumped 5 gallons more into a tank than it could even hold and thats with 3-4 gallons still in it when I started pumping.
The reality is that you will get cheated at pumps, so mpg is a reality of cheated fill-ups, so there is no sense knowing what it could get if all numbers were perfect, but what you calculate is taking into account the cheater pumps and the accurate pumps all together to give you an aggragate (spell?). The more fillups you have the better the numbers. One calculation off one tank fillup is of very little interest to anyone. Long-term numbers matter more.
If you lean out from 14.7, power will drop.

314982
 

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Youtube has a road test of a turbo'd 4cyl chev colorado by Fast Lane Trucks.Going up a 10 mile climb on some Cali interstate (6%) grade. It got 4mpg in their test.Alot of variables come into play.
You sure that wasn't the Ike Gauntlet ?
That would actually be in Colorado and most of the Hill climb test they do is on the IKE because it's so damn hard on Towing and gas

 

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That 14.7:1 chart is almost believable. I have not met an auto mechanic that is not angry at the mere suggestion of altering that ratio. However, this ratio is not the ideal ratio. It is the ideal solution for all driving environments we might see in N America, or most of the world's roads.
I know this because I leaned out my ratio.
Guess what happened? More power!
Take that chart!
On a long steady climb with no grade changes it is most obvious. As I lean out the mix the power goes up.
Overall mpg improves significantly also.
I did not have tools to measure what the ratio was, but it was between the 1471 and the point the engine starts to sputter and not fire. By between I mean about the mid point or just above the mid point, not the entire between.
If you have ever flown airplanes you know you have to constantly adjust the fuel ratio for altitude. Why? Because there is no ONE setting that works all the time everywhere. Higher altitudes mean less air, so a leaner mix brings the ratio back to normal. In the airplane ex the lean mix is still trying to maintain the same ratios, so Im arguing against myself a little, but I am not sure the vehicle can monitor and maintain to such exactness at every altitude, temp and environmental condition.
I question this, because, in fact, a leaner mix produced more power and greater economy, not just in my vehicle, but in 100's if not 1,000's of others in different vehicles, gas and diesel, who executed the same adjustments with the same results: more power, greater mpg.
I'm surprised that it was so common on a Hardbody motor, but I cannot find anyone who has tried it on this 15 year old design.
 

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That 14.7:1 chart is almost believable. I have not met an auto mechanic that is not angry at the mere suggestion of altering that ratio. However, this ratio is not the ideal ratio. It is the ideal solution for all driving environments we might see in N America, or most of the world's roads.
I know this because I leaned out my ratio.
Guess what happened? More power!
Take that chart!
On a long steady climb with no grade changes it is most obvious. As I lean out the mix the power goes up.
Overall mpg improves significantly also.
I did not have tools to measure what the ratio was, but it was between the 1471 and the point the engine starts to sputter and not fire. By between I mean about the mid point or just above the mid point, not the entire between.
If you have ever flown airplanes you know you have to constantly adjust the fuel ratio for altitude. Why? Because there is no ONE setting that works all the time everywhere. Higher altitudes mean less air, so a leaner mix brings the ratio back to normal. In the airplane ex the lean mix is still trying to maintain the same ratios, so Im arguing against myself a little, but I am not sure the vehicle can monitor and maintain to such exactness at every altitude, temp and environmental condition.
I question this, because, in fact, a leaner mix produced more power and greater economy, not just in my vehicle, but in 100's if not 1,000's of others in different vehicles, gas and diesel, who executed the same adjustments with the same results: more power, greater mpg.
I'm surprised that it was so common on a Hardbody motor, but I cannot find anyone who has tried it on this 15 year old design.
There's so much incorrect info in here I don't no where to start,but we'll start with the suggestion that diesel engine's use A/F ratio's to determine power in a way similar to a gas engine,and I have no idea how many hours you have in your log book, I've only got about 500 on a C140, but the only time I touch the mixture lever is one time after take-off and climb to altitude,never seen any pilot constantly fiddle with it.I'd like to know how you eliminated your O2 sensors and ECM from your truck to allow you to lean out that much, And have you checked your plugs and piston tops after running that lean?? It all sounds suspicious to me. Please enlighten us.Thx
 

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The stoichiometric, (Ideal) for a gasoline engine, air fuel ratio is not the best for power or gas mileage, it is the ideal for power and gas mileage. 12.6 to 1 is where it will make the most power and 15.4 to 1 is were it is the most efficient.
I picked this info up from 20 years of drag racing. I set everything at 12.6 for the track.
 

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Fill your tank, reset your trip meter, drive for 250-300 miles, fill up again and divide miles driven by # of gallons to BEST obtain MPGs. Going by the display on your dash is just not nearly as accurate.
The Trip Computer is badly off ever since mods The DTE on fill up reads 245
I know for a fact I can get more out of then that
 

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diesel trucks are hardly anyones concern here...
Airplanes would do this with big changes in altitude, not at a constant cruising altitude and not with an engine that does that automatically. Again, planes not important...
How do I know? I did it many years. I did keep constant watch on the spark plugs to evaluate what the valves inside the cylinder might be doing, but I was not leaning out so much as to cause significant temp increases to burn out the engine. Ideally, You would monitor exhaust temps, and thus be able to lean out up to the safe limit. I went a little bit and gained HP and MPGs, yet could have seen more mpg increases with a temp sensor allowing me to monitor it.
In the Hardbody, as mentioned, I spoofed the MAF sensor to think less air is passing. There are a couple different routes to the same result in spoofing. What the O2 sensor sees is part of the equation, but obviously not absolutely going to over-ride the other sensors and richen the mix beyond what I can lean out. You can spoof the O2 as well.
Don't bother questioning the Hardbody, or other similar model year vehicle modification. It is pretty settled and better to go research all that from thousands who have done it already than try to argue facts here. The HHO forums are a good source of knowledge, yet, like here, there will be bad info too, which anyone with any internet sense will already know about and not worth the mention either.
I'm more interested who has done this on the Frontier as it has more engine controls.
I may be the first to try.
rholland had an interesting tidbit, would like to hear more...
 

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2005 V6 auto 2wd kingcab. Averaging 19.5 mpg. Mixed two lane driving. Does better on interstate driving with cruise, but I don’t do enough of that to be sure, but generally 23mpg +/-1.
 

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2005 V6 auto 2wd kingcab. Averaging 19.5 mpg. Mixed two lane driving. Does better on interstate driving with cruise, but I don’t do enough of that to be sure, but generally 23mpg +/-1.
If most people learned how to operate the cruise control, their fuel economy would go up. Bio-metric studies show all people feather the gas pedal. Some days more than others. The cruise maintains the greatest consistency.
 

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If most people learned how to operate the cruise control, their fuel economy would go up. Bio-metric studies show all people feather the gas pedal. Some days more than others. The cruise maintains the greatest consistency.
By the way, I still haven't learned my Frontier's cruise yet.
 

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I use cruise control anytime I am not coming up to a light and above the speed it needs to be activated. I am a huge fan of cruise control, that's why I am trying to fix it on this truck I just bought. I would be using it driving around the golf course here on base coming and going from work if it was working now and the speed limit on base is 30mph
 

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My wife won't use cruise under any circumstances. Her Honda Civic averages in the low 30's when she drives. When I drive, one trip to airport and back, 47 mpg. From FL to Memphis loaded down, 40+. My Durango is similar as far a savings, but not even in the same league as the Civic.
 

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I love Honda's. Velvety engines w/ a swoosh of power upstairs. Wish they made their ugly Ridgeline w/ a 7' box and a 6 or 7 speed manual transmission...that was PRICED like a Frontier.

My gal's Honda Fit is a buzzy lil commuter car. It's really not much fun at all on the hwy since it's turning close to 4k RPMs on the interstate. But, low-mid 30s MPG for 100% city driving is hard to beat.
 

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I love Honda's. Velvety engines w/ a swoosh of power upstairs. Wish they made their ugly Ridgeline w/ a 7' box and a 6 or 7 speed manual transmission...that was PRICED like a Frontier.
Don't we all.....I'll add, have a body on frame like a Frontier also.
 
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