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***SOLD***Up for sale all new never used, only tested SWR Uniden CB Set. Have about $250 into it, decided to go with 2-ways instead. Everything purchased on Amazon except coax cable. I wanted a removable option so I fused a cigarette lighter plug to fit in the center console. Not pictured is an external speaker. Selling as a set - don't really want to separate.

$160 shipped to continental US. Listed items below.

RF coaxial coax adapter UHF male PL259 to female so239 right angle
FireStik K4 Antenna Stud Mounts
RG58A/U COAX CABLE 3 foot Jumper for CB / Ham Radio - Workman CX-3-PL-PL
K40 K403CBPP 2-Wire 15A 3-Pin CB Power Cord with 12V Cigarette Lighter Plug
WORKMAN 40-8009 FME MALE TO UHF PL259 MALE ADAPTER
RoadPro RPSP-15 Universal CB Extension Speaker with Swivel Bracket, 2-3/4 x 4-1/2"
USA-CA RG58 PL259 UHF MALE to FME FEMALE Coaxial RF Pigtail Cable
Firestik SS-3H Heavy Duty Stainless Steel Antenna Spring
Astatic PDC1 100 Watt SWR Meter
Firestik II FS3-R Tunable Tip CB Antenna, Red (3 feet)
Hustler QD-2 Antenna Quick Disconnect - Stainless Steel!
FireStik SS-204A Adjustable stainless steel vertical door jamb mount (Powder coated white)
Firestik 4ft Firestik ® II FS Series Tunable Tip CB Antenna 900 Watts White - Firestik FS-4WH
18 Ft White Marine Grade RG8x PL259 to FME Male Cable USA Made Coaxial Cable
Uniden PRO520XL 40-Channel CB Radio
 

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What is the purpose of having multiple antennae? I'm a CB noob but Im in the market for one
coverage. an antenna will be shaded or blocked in its radiation pattern opposite of the truck. Dual antennas will do 2 things. it will get you greater radiation to the side (compared to the single ant) it also will concentrate the signal F-R. This is ideal for highway drivers.
Think of an antenna as a lightbulb or candle. This is the reason the best place (for signal distance) to place the antenna is on top the roof, and the worst is the bumper. There are measures you can take to mitigate a lower mounting (such as a taller antenna)
Take a look at Right Channel Radios articles & videos. They can explain it better than I can. I need to do it in person and with a whiteboard... too much the engineer...
 

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Also, keep in mind that on the average passenger vehicle, you don't have enough distance to separate the antennae properly, which can have a detrimental effect on your radio wave propagation, potentially giving you worse performance than a single antenna.
 

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Yup. Twin sticks need to be at least five feet apart at a minimum, and ideally around nine feet.

The main reason you see them on OTR rigs is because A) it directs the signal more front-rear than left-right, and B) the trailer would block the signal on a single antenna.
 

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So, my truck is a 2012 Pro4X CC with a camper shell. If I mounted one of these antennae to the rear bumper and the other on th front bumper, that would be the ideal setup?
No

read me

I mean, your uses are your own, but what you describe would extend your range left-right and severely limit it front and rear.

Best usage for a trail rig is a single antenna, centered on the roof.
 

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No

I mean, your uses are your own, but what you describe would extend your range left-right and severely limit it front and rear.

Best usage for a trail rig is a single antenna, centered on the roof.
Right on. Also, you can illegally boost a CB to get quite a distance and then there is the overcast weather which sometimes can get you really far. Like some of the other guys have recommended, I also recommend that you read up some on Antennas, CBs, as well as 2 ways. Keeping in mind, who you want to communicate with and where. Remember, you still have a phone. (maybe)
 

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Right on. Also, you can illegally boost a CB to get quite a distance and then there is the overcast weather which sometimes can get you really far. Like some of the other guys have recommended, I also recommend that you read up some on Antennas, CBs, as well as 2 ways. Keeping in mind, who you want to communicate with and where. Remember, you still have a phone. (maybe)
Boosting wattage and playing around when the skip is rolling (in the right conditions, radio waves perform an atmospheric skip, making them go much further than normal) is fun for the hobbyist, but again, impractical for trail usage. Running a boosted box when the people you're talking to are 20' in front of you will annoy them greatly, and possibly damage their radio (even more annoying)

Quality radio, mic, and antenna. Good antenna well tuned and placed correctly. These are the keys to trail comms.

Ask anyone I've wheeled with on these forums my trials and tribulations with amateur radio...
 
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