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Discussion Starter #1
Hi All,

Quick question. My Frontier is a little light in the back during winter and I struggle for traction (granted, my first winter with it was with the stock Hankook tyres). Does anyone have any ideas/solutions to get some weight into the load bed?

I have been told cinder blocks etc. but I am not keen having then banging about all winter (even with the Uni Trak system trying to tie them down) and then having to store them come spring.

I was thinking 5 or 6 20KG bags of water softener salt tied down in the bed andf then I can use them in spring/summer/fall and just replace in winter.

Any other ideas?

Cheers

Andrew
 

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I live in the St.Louis area and sand bags are the most popular around here. I plan on throwing a couple in mine this winter. I noticed on wet roads it tends to slide a little easy so I'd already made up my mind about the bags. I agree with you about the cinder block method.

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Thanks for the reply. My issue with the sand bags is the same as the cinder blocks. What do I do with the sand come spring? :) At least i can use the water softener salt. I am just wondering is anybody has a soft bag filled with water solution that will freeze over winter, thaw is spring, drain the water out and fold up the bag perhaps?
 

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I get by fine without added weight in the bed, although I do have a cap (added weight). To me, it's all about the tires. You really need a winter tire, or an off-road oriented tire with a winter rating.

Vic
 

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Hankook Dyna Pro ATM did very well for me on last Frontier. Do you have the H/T's from the factory? You can use sand bags, I'd stay away from salt as if it leaks at all you're inviting corrosion from it.
They make a water bag with chamber dividers to keep it from moving around, in the spring you drain it and fold it for the off season.

Clint
 

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I store my bags in the garage. I won't go overboard with a lot of them.. Some say yeah throw it in 4wd but that doesn't help with sliding. Hence the people you see on the side of the road in an ice storm that think because they have 4wd, they don't need to be cautious.

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I didn't say they would, but a heavier load in the back does help with traction. Of course, I've got Nitto All Terrains, so I could always test it out without bags. I dunno. Maybe you're right.

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it does help for sure, agreed.


with my driving style and what i do, it just doesnt make much sense for me to spend time and money adding weight to the bed.
 

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it does help for sure, agreed.


with my driving style and what i do, it just doesnt make much sense for me to spend time and money adding weight to the bed.
It will probably make my gas mileage worse also. I'm just gonna try it one time to see how it does. I do have some stuff on mine to make it a bit heavier than a regular SV model anyway.

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I almost always just use 4x4 in the winter. (if there is snow on the road I'm in 4x)

There really isn't any reason not to if you're in a situation where you want sandbags in the back. Studded tires are the best thing ever, too.
 

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Centered over the axle and can handle cargo on top of it as well. So you don't have to take it out every time you need to use the bed
 

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LOL, so that's a Walmart design, they actually use those in their semi's that run the west in the winter, not so much for traction weight, but to keep them from being blown over on I-25 or I-80 in Wyoming. Some of the trailers also have a large concrete block in the nose over the tractors drive axle for weight, and then several of those water bladders in the middle, and they fill them from their last stop before heading back.'


I have a topper on my SV, the 200 lbs it adds is not enough. I've got my contico tool box in the front with a few items in it. I guess I've got maybe 250 lbs in the bed total. I just use 4wd and not worry about it.
 

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Discussion Starter #17 (Edited)
I have the factory H/T's. I found that they were ok in deepish snow but the cold just turned them into Lego blocks.

I see Walmart or Canadian Tire no longer stock them here in Canada. Will have to look for a supplier. Thanks for the link! :) It's exactly what I was looking for.
 

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There was a bit of a nip in the air this morning.

Winter tires are the only real solution. I assume that Ontario stays cold so your snow stays dry. Around here it gets above freezing most days and the snow melts and turns to ICE at night. I don't run any additional weight other than a camper shell; which is only slightly more than 100 lbs. But I do switch out to winter tires seasonally. A modern studless will spank an old school studded tire anyday for traction. Currently I am running a studdable winter tire that I do not stud. Master craft courser MSR. Not as good as the blizzaks I have for the wife's car. but way cheaper.



In my 2/Rwd car I throw about 150lbs of sand in the back + winter tires.
 

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I've got yet to go through winter with my truck but my old friend used to keep a couple of wooden pallets in his truck. You could strap them down to keep them from sliding. He also tossed a couple sand bags in there too. We worked at a grocery store and he would just toss the pallets in with the old ones going back to the warehouse during the summer and grab new ones each winter.
 

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First winter I bought several bags of tube sand. They lasted 2 seasons before the plastic bags began to wear out. During the winter they freeze solid so there's no worry of the sand going anywhere. 2nd spring I dumped the tubes into several short rubbermaid storage tubs. Keeps the sand tidy and easy to strap down. Total I have about 320lbs. Takes care of the small snow, when it gets deep, flip the knob.
And get some decent tires...
 
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