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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Anyone have any experience using flutter stacks in their coilovers? I'm still trying to decide how to correct my currently soft running truck and during my research, I came across this. Before I read about these stacks, I was thinking of using the Jounce Shocks with what I'm running now but I wasn't too sure it that would be the "right" way to do things, almost like a band-aid fix.

If I get my coilovers valved with flutter stacks as well as having some extra shims and/or heavier oil thrown in there, I should in theory have a truck that would run smooth on the small bumps as well as having good bottom out resistance? Thanks for any replies guys!

btw if anyone is wondering, I do just about all kinds of off road driving with my truck except for "intentional" jumping.
 

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Just a quick read for other looking into what a "flutter stack" is: Inside King Shocks Assembled Piston Head Photo 13

Basically it is installed to change the way in which the oil moves from one side of the piston to the other. This stack is usually a cone shape but a fluttered stack has larger and small disks sandwiched together.

If anyone has a better explaination and a link it would be nice to be able to read up on this since a lot of members have started to run COs and it would be nice to have some more info about them.
 

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Thanks, I guess I could have done a better job explaining what it was.
I figured that there would only be a handful of members that understood exactly what you ment and at the time, I was not one of them. Now I know a little and hope that others will broaden their minds. Now I understand more about COs and how they work.
 

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I don't know if my situation is the same but...
I recently got Rad2.0's from PRG. I do like them, and think they were an improvement. However. Now that I have them cranked up so im level with my 2" AAL's, it feels as though the CO's are to stiff. Now I understand it's a lift so it will be rougher, but im talking beyond that. Senario: Driving down road, expansion crack/sharp bumps sound and feel jarring. Bigger bumps/deeper dips it seems to take it very nice. I know that these CO's ARE capable of running very smooth in most all situations. When I first installed them I did not crank them up. I could hit the worst wash-board gravel road I could find and it was butter smooth. To the point where I was bragging about to my buds. Now I have them cranked up to where I have about an inch clearance between UCA and coilbucket. Its still ok, but it feels as though they have lost alot of the "progessiveness" they had at the lower setting. Hitting wash-board roads is back to being rough again. And the suspension just seems louder now. Like it really is too stiff for the short quick bumps, and fine for the bigger.

Sorry if this was kinda rambling, or not relative to your topic at all. Its just been on my mind lately and this seemed as though it might be related.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 · (Edited)
I'd say you've preloaded your springs too far if it's riding as stiff as you say it is. I had a similar problem so I undid the preload and added a spacer to make up for the lift. As far as I'm concerned, the eye to eye length of the shock is what will lift your truck, the spring rate will determine your sag and the amount of preload will fine tune where the truck sits within the allotted travel.

I don't know why cranking the coils is such a popular way to lift a truck because all it's doing is increasing compression travel and reducing droop travel as well as making for a stiffer ride. Would make more sense to me if manufacturers actually made a longer shock with the right spring for that length.

I know there has been quite a heated debate about this but after reading all that I could handle, this is what makes the most sense to me.
 

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^^I actually just read a bit about a 1 inch spacer being used to be able to back off the co's a little bit. I may give that a go.
I knew next to nothing about lifts and 4x4's when I bought my truck, and still didn't necessarily know a whole bunch when I bought my lift a few months ago. I just wanted the max lift I could get without going DB. Coilovers seemed to be the most functional way of doing that so that's what I did. Even with only 1 inch of clearance between my UCA's and coilbucket, I don't think I have heard any unexpected contact at all except for situations where I knew it would. Meaning I don't have any problems on daily driving with coilbucket contact, not really even speed bumps unless I really give'r over them. And my buckets don't seem to have any marking/scaring either to make me think im wrong.

Sorry if I rambled. Thanks for your input.

One more thing. Since you seem to know a bit about Coilovers, how come CO's for our trucks or maybe trucks in general are not adjustable like car or motorcycle shocks? My buddy is buying CO's for his civic and they're adjustable (aside from preload) and made me wonder why Radflo's aren't.

Thanks
 
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