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Discussion Starter #1
So I'm in the middle of changing all of the fluids in my truck.

Backstory - Bought the truck used about 2.5 years ago and only had the rear diff changed.

So I changed the rear diff and, as you'd expect, it wasn't too bad. This was a 30k mile change

Transfer case was bad. Lots of sludge attached to the drain plug. This was a 60k mile change. I'd say this is by far the hardest of them all to change. The fill hole is just not accessible.

Front diff - It wasn't too bad at all. Had some sludge but I don't offroad enough to put a lot of time on it. Glad it's done though. This too was a 60k mile change.

Next is the tranny. A job for tomorrow. I did check the fluid today though. It's a golden brown. I don't think it was too bad at all but I've already purchased the tranny oil so I'll do it tomorrow morning. It will also be a 60k mile change.

I've always been a bit leary about doing this myself. Other than needing a bag of kittylitter to clean up the driveway, it was uneventful.
 

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The fill hole is just not accessible.
Do you have a pump ($7 at your local auto parts store -- screws onto the fluid bottle) to fill with? If not, get one; they're well worth it.

Your truck will be happy once you're all done.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
trans fluid quantity question

OK - So I drained the trans fluid this morning and mowed while it was dripping out. It came up short of 4 quarts - Probably 3 3/4 quarts of fluid. The dipstick didn't register low when the truck was cool. I forgot to check it when it was hot.

I measured by pouring the old fluid into a gallon jug. Came up just short of what I'd call full.

I read in a lot of the posts about getting 4.5 quarts out of a drain/fill. But I also read a few about "just replace what came out and you'll be fine".

Should I be concerned?
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Golden brown transmission fluid? That surely needed to be changed. It should be reddish.
That's what it looked like to me on the dipstick (honestly!). When I drained it, it was reddish. First thing I thought of when I saw the fluid was this post. ha!
 

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Changing all the Fluids:

1) engine oil
2) transmission fluid
3) transfer case
4) front differential
5) rear differential
6) radiator coolant
7) power steering fluid
8) brake fluid

You have a long way to go......
 

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My Frontier is a low mileage truck: only 24k miles for an '06.

But before the snow flies around, I will do a drivetrain fluid change. This means both pumpkins, transfer case and 6M tranny.

A question concerning the 6M fluid: The fluid needs to meet GL-4 standards, but not better. GL-5 fluid that technically meets GL-4 standards will cause premature wear on the tranny. Is this true?

The fill ports for the 6M and transfer case are in difficult locations. There are fill pumps that will work. But has anyone taken out the shifter boot to gain access? Is the effort needed to remove the boot worth it?
 

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Stick with the correct fluid.

GL-4 and GL-5 are standards set by the American Petroleum Institute for gear oils. GL-4 are intended for axles with spiral bevel and hypoid gears operating under moderate to severe conditions of speeds and loads. They are also suitable for sychronized manual transmissions when MT-1 gear oils are NOT recommended. GL-4 should be used in limited-slip differentials. The GL-4 generally indicates "Limited Slip" properties in the gear oil; sometimes abbreviated as LS.

GL-5 is indicated for high-speed/shock loads and low-speed/high-torque conditions. GL-5 also has multi-purpose or mild EP (extreme) properties too. GL-5 is often seen with the MT-1 designation too.

MT-1 indicates lubricants intended for NON-sychronized manual transmissions. MT-1 indicates the additional additives necessary to protect against thermal degradation, component wear and oil-seal deterioration which are not requirements by GL-4 or GL-5 approval.

GL-5 is not the latest and greatest improvement over GL-4; unlike oil classifications where higher classification numbers mean tougher standards and backward compatiblity. It is important to know what type of gears you are lubricating, their applications and follow the manufacturer's recommendations!


I always use an inexpensive hand transfer pump to change these fluids. They are very cheap at Walmart, Kmart, or any Auto Parts store and work great.
One tube for in and one tube for out.
 

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Stick with the correct fluid.

GL-4 and GL-5 are standards set by the American Petroleum Institute for gear oils. GL-4 are intended for axles with spiral bevel and hypoid gears operating under moderate to severe conditions of speeds and loads. They are also suitable for sychronized manual transmissions when MT-1 gear oils are NOT recommended. GL-4 should be used in limited-slip differentials. The GL-4 generally indicates "Limited Slip" properties in the gear oil; sometimes abbreviated as LS.

GL-5 is indicated for high-speed/shock loads and low-speed/high-torque conditions. GL-5 also has multi-purpose or mild EP (extreme) properties too. GL-5 is often seen with the MT-1 designation too.

MT-1 indicates lubricants intended for NON-sychronized manual transmissions. MT-1 indicates the additional additives necessary to protect against thermal degradation, component wear and oil-seal deterioration which are not requirements by GL-4 or GL-5 approval.

GL-5 is not the latest and greatest improvement over GL-4; unlike oil classifications where higher classification numbers mean tougher standards and backward compatiblity. It is important to know what type of gears you are lubricating, their applications and follow the manufacturer's recommendations!


I always use an inexpensive hand transfer pump to change these fluids. They are very cheap at Walmart, Kmart, or any Auto Parts store and work great.
One tube for in and one tube for out.
What is the source of your information?
 

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The information regarding GL4 and GL5 oils came from API: American Petroleum Institute.
Welcome To The API Website

Its specifically from API Publication 1560 Titled:
"Lubricant Service Designations for
Automotive Manual Transmissions,
Manual Transaxles, and Axles
API PUBLICATION 1560
SEVENTH EDITION"
 
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