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2022 Frontier SV LWB 4x4
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Yo SuperDave1, what is the make and model of your travel trailer?

Since your SV is towing it satisfactorily, something similar will be a candidate for my shopping list.
The trailer is a 2018 Coachmen Freedom Express 204RD. I'm thinking of selling it and going with the Coachmen Apex Nano 213RD. It has a similar floor plan but has a slide and is one foot longer but narrow at 71/2' and opposed to the 204RD which is 8'. The 213RD is also a little lighter and has less tongue weight.
 

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Thank you!
 

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I tow a 17 ft camper just fine. I cruise around 60-70, and average 13 to 14mpg on flat ground. Less going up mountains. Camper tongue weight (I think) is around 400lbs. The picture was coming back from 'boondocking' and my tanks were full. Have some squat, looking at some helper springs/bags this summer.

Cloud Wheel Sky Tire Land vehicle
 

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Towing these small trailers and you realize why the truck has side mirrors.... so you can check to see if the trailer is still there. Small trailers are nothing to tow.
In a 4 cyl truck be aware that the trans only locks in 5th gear, not 4th (and sadly the v-6 does not lock in 3rd gear, ever, whats wrong with you Nissan?). You will be driving unlocked most of the time in the 4 banger so keep in mind your trans temps will be running high.
 

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I tow a 17 ft camper just fine. I cruise around 60-70, and average 13 to 14mpg on flat ground. Less going up mountains. Camper tongue weight (I think) is around 400lbs. The picture was coming back from 'boondocking' and my tanks were full. Have some squat, looking at some helper springs/bags this summer.

View attachment 347540
I put on FIrestone bags and they are great, even for a small cargo trailer. The leaf springs in these trucks sag pretty early on in their life, so adding bags will be good even unloaded. My 2015 truck I keep 10-15 psi in them unloaded, even up to 30, the truck will sit higher in the back at 30, but the ride is still smooth. With a small trailer like yours I would only need 40psi.
I sprang for the $400 Firestone air bags, but those $100 red ones you might see out there will work just as good. There is no magic to air bags, they are literally just thick balloons that sit under the components and help out. If you are handy and wanna save a buck then that would be an option. I cant speak for their quality though.
 

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2022 Frontier SV LWB 4x4
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I tow a 17 ft camper just fine. I cruise around 60-70, and average 13 to 14mpg on flat ground. Less going up mountains. Camper tongue weight (I think) is around 400lbs. Looking at getting helper springs since we travel alot. The picture was coming back from 'boondocking' and my tanks were full. Have some squat, looking at some helper springs/bags this summer.

View attachment 347540
Do the Sumosprings in blue. They are easy to install and fairly inexpensive.
 

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Towing these small trailers and you realize why the truck has side mirrors.... so you can check to see if the trailer is still there. Small trailers are nothing to tow.
In a 4 cyl truck be aware that the trans only locks in 5th gear, not 4th (and sadly the v-6 does not lock in 3rd gear, ever, whats wrong with you Nissan?). You will be driving unlocked most of the time in the 4 banger so keep in mind your trans temps will be running high.
I actually have the v6 in mine, I'm not sure what you mean about locking in gear. I do know that when in 5th, if you hit a small hill, it will shift back into 4th. Going up any larger grades I do take it out of over drive.
 

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I put on FIrestone bags and they are great, even for a small cargo trailer. The leaf springs in these trucks sag pretty early on in their life, so adding bags will be good even unloaded. My 2015 truck I keep 10-15 psi in them unloaded, even up to 30, the truck will sit higher in the back at 30, but the ride is still smooth. With a small trailer like yours I would only need 40psi.
I sprang for the $400 Firestone air bags, but those $100 red ones you might see out there will work just as good. There is no magic to air bags, they are literally just thick balloons that sit under the components and help out. If you are handy and wanna save a buck then that would be an option. I cant speak for their quality though.
I haven't really decided on bags or just helper springs yet, leaning more towards the bags. I love the idea to be able to control the bags, and height of the truck, but like the simplicity of helper springs. Yes, they are just there, you get what you get in height and performance (could be an advantage?). I am pretty handy so I would be installing them myself.

Do the Sumosprings in blue. They are easy to install and fairly inexpensive.
I was looking at the black Sumo Springs on ETrailer (and the helper springs). I like watching their install videos Lol. They have a few videos for installing things on our trucks.
 

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The torque converter will lock when up to speed in 4th and 5th gear. Look up how that works and it will make more sense. Probably on your hill your truck is staying in 5th gear and just unlocking the TC, your rpm's will jump 1,000 when this happens. For just a shift to 4th the rpm's will only jump 400 or so. The truck likes to unlock rather than make a shift, this is supposed to be easier on the life of the transmission too. however, running unlocked will create more heat in the trans and will be less efficient for your mpg's. When going up a long hill I just manually shift to 4th so truck climbs hill in a locked 4th rather than an unlocked 5th. If not towing then just let the truck do what it wants. IN these trucks the 4th gear is also a 1 to 1 ratio in that the engine directly turns the driveshaft. On a manual trans this would mean there is a direct link from engine to the driveshaft, and no trans gears are being used to drive the truck, but Im not sure how it works on an auto - less gears are being turned though.

I would do the bags unless you are poor. Having stiffer springs for towing, and stiffer springs for a daily driver not good. Being able to adjust the suspension is a good thing - you are controlling all of the suspension, not just catching it at the bottom after the truck sags or something. Those fixes are fine for always towing, but I am guessing most Fronty owners are not always towing, you get a bigger truck for always-towing needs.
 

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I haven't really decided on bags or just helper springs yet, leaning more towards the bags. I love the idea to be able to control the bags, and height of the truck, but like the simplicity of helper springs. Yes, they are just there, you get what you get in height and performance (could be an advantage?). I am pretty handy so I would be installing them myself.



I was looking at the black Sumo Springs on ETrailer (and the helper springs). I like watching their install videos Lol. They have a few videos for installing things on our trucks.
I had the black ones on my 2013 and they were a little rough without a trailer. The blue ones would hold your load fine and give a better ride.
 

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The torque converter will lock when up to speed in 4th and 5th gear. Look up how that works and it will make more sense. Probably on your hill your truck is staying in 5th gear and just unlocking the TC, your rpm's will jump 1,000 when this happens. For just a shift to 4th the rpm's will only jump 400 or so. The truck likes to unlock rather than make a shift, this is supposed to be easier on the life of the transmission too. however, running unlocked will create more heat in the trans and will be less efficient for your mpg's. When going up a long hill I just manually shift to 4th so truck climbs hill in a locked 4th rather than an unlocked 5th. If not towing then just let the truck do what it wants. IN these trucks the 4th gear is also a 1 to 1 ratio in that the engine directly turns the driveshaft. On a manual trans this would mean there is a direct link from engine to the driveshaft, and no trans gears are being used to drive the truck, but Im not sure how it works on an auto - less gears are being turned though.

I would do the bags unless you are poor. Having stiffer springs for towing, and stiffer springs for a daily driver not good. Being able to adjust the suspension is a good thing - you are controlling all of the suspension, not just catching it at the bottom after the truck sags or something. Those fixes are fine for always towing, but I am guessing most Fronty owners are not always towing, you get a bigger truck for always-towing needs.
Ahh.. Thats why there is the button on the shifter that only lets it go into 4th gear. Thanks for explaining that. I am thinking the bags will be best. Not poor, but not rich either! I don't tow all the time, most of the time is just city driving, occasionally highway from Carson City to Reno.


I had the black ones on my 2013 and they were a little rough without a trailer. The blue ones would hold your load fine and give a better ride.
I like the idea of the 'better ride' I'll look into the blue ones. Thanks for your recommendation.
 

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On a manual trans this would mean there is a direct link from engine to the driveshaft, and no trans gears are being used to drive the truck, but Im not sure how it works on an auto - less gears are being turned though.
Just wanted to let you know that in a manual you are absolutely turning the gears, just as many as you would in any other gear except reverse.

The input shaft from the clutch is short and all it does is turn the countershaft and all that does is turn all the gears (which freewheel) on the output shaft. When you select a gear you are connecting a gear on the output shaft to the shaft itself.


An auto, beats me but I'd bet more are turning as each planetary gearset is a Sun, Ring, and three or four Planets sooo.. I have taken one apart and put it together again, just not a pickup transmission but a semi tractor one.

Anyway, just wanted to clarify what goes on in the guts of a stick shift transmission for the uninitiated.
 
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Yes, thanks. All the gears turn and that is good to keep the oil flowing through the transmission, but the manual 4th, though it turns, the other gears are just freewheeling, as you say, so are not under a load, the load goes straight through for what I can tell having had to replace two poorly rebuilt transmissions on a big truck. All the gears turn but only one gear is selected and under load.
My issues on the 3/4 ton truck was that 5th gear (the highest gear on it) is a really small gear with just a few teeth, unlike 1st gear that is a giant cog with lots of teeth, and the 5th gear is under a lot of load due to this. The poor workmanship in my rebuilt trans became obvious towing. I did not tow in 5th uphill but would on flat ground at a low load, but it still went. Not really an issue on an auto since the TC will protect the transmission from too much stress, but if you have a manual then be careful in high gear (O/D).
Newer auto transmissions use planetary gears to turn the shaft (Im sure I am not saying this right) and those 3 gears are spreading the workload out so these autos can be more durable than a manual which still has one gear turn one other gear. IDK what the Fronty has, these are old designs, so likely are old trans designs too.

**so, for those still confused - we are talking about gears that are under load, and not concerned if the un-used gears are turning or not, unused gears that spin are not under load, do not see stress, will not create heat, will not wear etc. So, in 4th gear you are not using 1st gear, not using 2nd gear, not using 5th gear, so the gears are not under load, not getting worn, not creating heat. There is no 4th gear in a way as there is no need to gear down or gear up because the input shaft and output shaft are turning the same speed. There are other toothed cog things going on, but there is no gearing in 4th.
 

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Just wanted to let you know that in a manual you are absolutely turning the gears, just as many as you would in any other gear except reverse.

The input shaft from the clutch is short and all it does is turn the countershaft and all that does is turn all the gears (which freewheel) on the output shaft. When you select a gear you are connecting a gear on the output shaft to the shaft itself.


An auto, beats me but I'd bet more are turning as each planetary gearset is a Sun, Ring, and three or four Planets sooo.. I have taken one apart and put it together again, just not a pickup transmission but a semi tractor one.

Anyway, just wanted to clarify what goes on in the guts of a stick shift transmission for the uninitiated.
Your correct, the other guy obviously never graduated from tranny school.
 

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Yes, thanks. All the gears turn and that is good to keep the oil flowing through the transmission, but the manual 4th, though it turns, the other gears are just freewheeling, as you say, so are not under a load, the load goes straight through for what I can tell having had to replace two poorly rebuilt transmissions on a big truck. All the gears turn but only one gear is selected and under load.
My issues on the 3/4 ton truck was that 5th gear (the highest gear on it) is a really small gear with just a few teeth, unlike 1st gear that is a giant cog with lots of teeth, and the 5th gear is under a lot of load due to this. The poor workmanship in my rebuilt trans became obvious towing. I did not tow in 5th uphill but would on flat ground at a low load, but it still went. Not really an issue on an auto since the TC will protect the transmission from too much stress, but if you have a manual then be careful in high gear (O/D).
Newer auto transmissions use planetary gears to turn the shaft (Im sure I am not saying this right) and those 3 gears are spreading the workload out so these autos can be more durable than a manual which still has one gear turn one other gear. IDK what the Fronty has, these are old designs, so likely are old trans designs too.

**so, for those still confused - we are talking about gears that are under load, and not concerned if the un-used gears are turning or not, unused gears that spin are not under load, do not see stress, will not create heat, will not wear etc. So, in 4th gear you are not using 1st gear, not using 2nd gear, not using 5th gear, so the gears are not under load, not getting worn, not creating heat. There is no 4th gear in a way as there is no need to gear down or gear up because the input shaft and output shaft are turning the same speed. There are other toothed cog things going on, but there is no gearing in 4th.
When ANY forward gear is selected there are four gears that the power are going through. The input gear to the jackshaft gear, then the corresponding jackshaft gear to the output shaft gear. That's four gears in total that the power from the engine is going through to make it to the driveshaft. Fourth gear is exactly the same as 1st through 6th.
 
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