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Apples to oranges 4runner isn't a truck
And ranger doesn't have a 3.5l so when comparing if you want to compare a 35k truck to a 60k truck you aren't making a fair comparison
 

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Apples to oranges 4runner isn't a truck
And ranger doesn't have a 3.5l so when comparing if you want to compare a 35k truck to a 60k truck you aren't making a fair comparison
Dude, you are the one stating that in order to get a new vehicle you will have to get a DI engine. There are brand new vehicles with port injection engines, Heck you can still get a 2019 Frontier brand new with Port injection. You don't have to settle for a DI engine just because you want a brand new vehicle. DI injection was created long time ago and i know its here to stay. Based on Freaking Emissions Car manufacturers are obliged to use DI but the advantages of the DI engine "to me" are not worth it. I would rather take an engine that lasts a long time and take minimal maintenance than spending money every 20k in walnut blasting and putting crap to clean the valves. New doesn't mean reliable or good. Look at all the early ford ecoboost engines all the problems they had with DI engines and they had to go the D4s Toyota way, dual port and direct injection. Eventually i see the manufacturers moving in that direction. Get into the forums of every manufacturer and you will see some scary things happening with DI engines. The headaches to me are not worth it. Its only a matter of time when you start seeing people complaining on this engine and the carbon buildup. Again my .2 cents
 

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Oh my God the sky is falling. DI injection is only a problem for people who don't do regular and this is club frontier not club pathfinder or club titan
 

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The manufacturers use DI engines to pass the ever more stringent epa regulations and to get the best hp/ltr numbers out to one up the tow ratings of the last guy. Most drivers nowadays only keep their vehicles for 2-3yrs before upgrading when the problems start creeping up. It takes quite awhile for enough carbon to build up to eventually break off and punch a hole in a hot piston or bend a valve. Like said earlier, it's hard to feel a very gradual decrease in performance over time. I had a hyundai veloster with the 1.6 gdi engine and whenever I'd take it in for a tsb or warranty work, they'd always try to sell me an "induction cleaning" service for $185. If people didn't stay on top of it with seafoam and such then the next stop was the walnut blasters.
I had an idea that I emailed Berryman company to try to resolve the issues, but got the standard "we'll send the idea on to our research dept..." Maybe I should contact shark tank! Lmao.
I put berryman in my tank every 10 fillups hell I even use it in my lawnmower
 

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I looked at the new 3.8L 2020 engine up close today. The high pressure pump is right next to the brake master cylinder. One of the hoses coming out of the bottom of the pump goes right to the intake manifold about 2" before the throttle body. It's black rubber and is about the same size as the vacuum line that connects the engine to the power brake booster. Could it be some kind of gas "rinse cycle" that engine might benefit from since it's D.I.? Anyone else looked up close?
I drove one also - not keen on that 9 speed transmission at all. The truck seems sluggish in first gear, so I gave it more throttle, then it shifted into 2nd and lunged forward. All other shifts are perceptible, but barely noticeable. It also hesitated a few seconds when I floored it from a stop. It did that several times when I hit the gas hard. It wasn't fully warmed up though. Once it started moving though - wow did it move.
The oil filter is in the same place as the 4.0L, but there's enough space that I could reach it from the top if I wanted to. There's a lot more open space between the engine and the radiator on the passenger side area.
The push button start works really well. You don't have to hold it down until the engine starts - just press the brake and give the button a quick press - it starts. The transmission shifter is restyled with a push button in the front of it.

Everything else about the 2020 Frontier (SV) seems to be the same as the 2019.
 

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Isn't the DI mitigated by using a good oil catch can?
Yes
No. They'll coke up regardless. The catch-can may slow it down, my DI TurboCooper wasted its engine after I put a catch-can in anyway. The Turbo's coke up faster but all the DI's will have issues if they aren't hybrid DI & Port.
 
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DI has been around for a very long time Decades. With regular oil changes and the fuel detergents available it's a bs excuse to not buy a vehicle. It's just common sense, change the effing oil regularly and failure is reduced dramatically. And please stop comparing Minis to Nissans two completely different animals.
 

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Uh the whole point of DI being a problem is that the fuel with the additives is NOT coming into contact with the intake valves. It doesn't matter what you put in the fuel, it's not gonna do much, if anything at all.

Mini Cooper, GMC, Nissan, Mazda; it doesn't matter, if they aren't dual or port or have some novel cleaning system, DI is extra maintenance.

And furthermore, DI has been around since the early 1900s, but only 2.8% of American vehicles used gasoline DI in 2008, and then 50%!!! use it in 2016. We have yet to see the long term reliability of many of these motors.


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Uh the whole point of DI being a problem is that the fuel with the additives is NOT coming into contact with the intake valves. It doesn't matter what you put in the fuel, it's not gonna do much, if anything at all.

Mini Cooper, GMC, Nissan, Mazda; it doesn't matter, if they aren't dual or port or have some novel cleaning system, DI is extra maintenance.

And furthermore, DI has been around since the early 1900s, but only 2.8% of American vehicles used gasoline DI in 2008, and then 50%!!! use it in 2016. We have yet to see the long term reliability of many of these motors.


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Very informative links woodtemple. Thank you.

My hunch is that for people who do lots of highway dribing, DI probably isn't a huge issue. But for people like myself with an 11 km commute never exceeding 75 km/h, general jigging around town and very seldom doing true highway driving, it could be a big problem, even bigger in cold weather as it take a lot longer to get up to operating temperature.

When I was interested in buying a Frontier, my mechanic recommend the 2.5 litre I4 heavily based on my driving needs as he felt that the 4.0 litre V6 would not get much workout from me. I think the 3.8 with DI could be a real problem for Frontiers that just go around town. Around here Frontiers are a popular light duty work truck for businesses - that means lots of urban and suburban driving. Could be a big problem.
 
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Uh the whole point of DI being a problem is that the fuel with the additives is NOT coming into contact with the intake valves. It doesn't matter what you put in the fuel, it's not gonna do much, if anything at all.

Mini Cooper, GMC, Nissan, Mazda; it doesn't matter, if they aren't dual or port or have some novel cleaning system, DI is extra maintenance.

And furthermore, DI has been around since the early 1900s, but only 2.8% of American vehicles used gasoline DI in 2008, and then 50%!!! use it in 2016. We have yet to see the long term reliability of many of these motors.


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I agree with this statement, it doesn't matter which brand you have. DI will cause carbon buildup no matter what , I have seen engines with extremely expensive catch cans and after 20k they still have carbon buildup. Yes, the majority of vehicles now come with DI but I am just saying if you are looking for long term reliability this isn't it. Ford and Toyota learned their lessons already with DI and that is why they have Hybrid Injection systems. Again my 0.02 cents. This is a killer for me because i was planning to get this truck unless Nissan shows that their DI system is different which i doubt based on the 5.6 DI engines from the Titans which are having already carbon buildup problems.
 
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