Nissan Frontier Forum banner

1 - 20 of 36 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
213 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
i have a 2016 frontier V6, king cab, 60,000 miles. auto trans not 4 X 4. iam running castrol 10-30 full syn. iam thinking of going to shell Rotella sae 12W-40 full syn. i live in Wichita, ks. the coldest the air temp in winter is 0. i am wanting to get more engine protection in hot weather. what think?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
213 Posts
Discussion Starter #2
i have a 2016 frontier V6, king cab, 60,000 miles. auto trans not 4 X 4. iam running castrol 10-30 full syn. iam thinking of going to shell Rotella sae 15W-40 full syn. i live in Wichita, ks. the coldest the air temp in winter is 0. i am wanting to get more engine protection in hot weather. what think?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,134 Posts
Diesel engine oil has a different additive package than gas engine oil. Some of them can interfere with the life of the cats.
If the oil you are using does not indicate on the label GF-5, SN, or SN Plus, then use it at your own peril.
If you are using your truck in situations that exceed the protection offered by recommended engine oil, your truck won't last anyway as you'd need a bigger truck.

Also, 40 weight oil is a tad thick for an engine with 60K miles. It will increase oil pressure which is not a good thing. If it had 200K I'd say go for it, but not with 60K.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,450 Posts
Run 5w30.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,101 Posts
I would'nt worry about it, the castrol will do anything the rotella will do, just keep it changed regularly.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
838 Posts
i have a 2016 frontier V6, king cab, 60,000 miles. auto trans not 4 X 4. iam running castrol 10-30 full syn. iam thinking of going to shell Rotella sae 12W-40 full syn. i live in Wichita, ks. the coldest the air temp in winter is 0. i am wanting to get more engine protection in hot weather. what think?
You are doing damage using a weight not designed for the Engine if you want protection get a better brand Synthetic and keep up the 5000 miles maintenance
You should never change the oil weight or oil type that was listed you use conventional oil but synthetic is proven better choice
Now when you get over 100k Miles I would start using a High Mileage Synthetic to compensate for the regular synthetic that was used in the beginning look at is as progression of engine care

Bottom line different weights will hurt performance than increase it
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,101 Posts
Don't worry about running heavier weight oil if you don't mind a .010% loss in mileage, Nissan service manual for the 2016 frontier gives approval for up to 20-50w oil if your regional temps are between 30-100 degrees. This 5-30w debate is just for those who read the oil fill cap only.....lol. Synth oil is only an advantage at very low temps or extremely high temps for circulating thru the system. Is great for aircooled motors such as dirtbikes in 100 degree temps, but has no advantage over conventional oil when it comes to lubrication. I'd like to see where these guys are getting this data,but I'm pretty sure their just swallowing the marketing hype from the manufacturers.I'll be happy to post the chapter and page number of the service manual where it recommends 20-50 weight if your in doubt.It's pretty hard to argue with the engineers who built the truck but I'm sure some of these guys will.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,448 Posts
Synth oil is only an advantage at very low temps or extremely high temps for circulating thru the system. Is great for aircooled motors such as dirtbikes in 100 degree temps, but has no advantage over conventional oil when it comes to lubrication.
I strenuously disagree with this part of the statement. As with many many many of the electronics, chemicals and construction and fabrication techniques now used world-wide, synthetics came out of the development of military parts, weaponry and rocketry in WWII and directly following.

There is ZERO chance any dyno oil is going to equal the qualities of a good synthetic in any category, as it is built from the ground-up to be the best, especially the ones fabricated from natural gas, that have no oils as a base stock in their first iteration. 5w30 synthetic is the best, to follow not only Nissan recommendations but best-practices for engine wear and lubrication protection. If you believe 20w50 is better, or wish to run 12w40 diesel formulation, and dyno oil is just as good as synth, by all means, the 1A protects your opinion and I'll be happy as a clam to back you up 101%, but I'll still strenuously disagree. The wonderful thing about a Republic or Democracy is that everyone has the right to an opinion, right or wrong.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Tommy Pearson III

·
Registered
Joined
·
838 Posts
Don't worry about running heavier weight oil if you don't mind a .010% loss in mileage, Nissan service manual for the 2016 frontier gives approval for up to 20-50w oil if your regional temps are between 30-100 degrees. This 5-30w debate is just for those who read the oil fill cap only.....lol. Synth oil is only an advantage at very low temps or extremely high temps for circulating thru the system. Is great for aircooled motors such as dirtbikes in 100 degree temps, but has no advantage over conventional oil when it comes to lubrication. I'd like to see where these guys are getting this data,but I'm pretty sure their just swallowing the marketing hype from the manufacturers.I'll be happy to post the chapter and page number of the service manual where it recommends 20-50 weight if your in doubt.It's pretty hard to argue with the engineers who built the truck but I'm sure some of these guys will.
I would disagree ,I witness first hand why conventional oil sucks vs synthetic
#1 The Build up and sludge that comes from actual oil
#2 Synthetics have better additives for better all around lubrication
#3 Conventional Oils Break down faster and required to be changed more frequent
Conventional oil is used as a cheap out vs more Expensive synthetic and many would choose Synthetic over conventional

I had a oil change on my Frontier a while back and the A-holes tried to cheap out on me and use Conventional oil
I showed him have I never used that oil in my History of coming here made the guy do the job all over again not my fault he wasn't paying attention and just that fast he could of F'ed me up on some BS because he tried to cheap out on my Oil

Now I choose a preferred oil Royal Purple and if they don't have it I bring my own I don't play that Shyt
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,134 Posts
Additives make up somewhere between 1/3 and 40% of your "oil." There is very little difference between dino and synthetic under normal conditions because dino is full of synthetic additives. Those additives are what prevent sludge, so you will get none with either oil.

The only damage that could result from using heavier weight oil is wear on the plastic timing chain guides which are literally pressed into service with oil pressure. Higher oil pressure will result in higher pressure between the guides and the chain, and steel rubbing on plastic under high pressure is not a good thing. For that reason only, I'd suggest not using thicker oil on those overhead cam engines until they have higher mileage. Pushrod engines have no plastic guides...if they're even made anymore.

Other than that, nothing else in that engine will suffer from higher oil pressure from thicker oil.

The assertion that "tolerances are tighter" is misinterpreted. The machinery making engine parts certainly have tighter tolerances resulting in more consistent quality parts. Any machinists in the crowd can confirm that. But clearances inside an engine haven't changed in 60 years. Show me clearances from a current engine, and I'll show you the same clearances from 1960's service manuals. And 30 and 40 weight oils have been used in all of them. Although I suspect those tolerances will tighten soon when the new 0w-16 oil hits the market in June.

Thin oil is for increased fuel economy, not for better lubrication.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
677 Posts
Don't forget the variable valve timing is hydraulic so might make difference with oil thickness. I think more important is a quality filter with synthetic drainback valve. Don't forget Rotella makes a gas truck full syn now that is usually on sale at tractor supply store.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
677 Posts
I bought 2 jugs of it last time it was on sale for $18 and used the RP 10-2867 filter from Royal Purple Direct and my 2018 has never been this quiet on initial startup since I've owned it! YMMV.
 
  • Like
Reactions: busemans

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
6,065 Posts
ANYTHING can be supported OR refuted on the interwebs.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,448 Posts
The assertion that "tolerances are tighter" is misinterpreted. The machinery making engine parts certainly have tighter tolerances resulting in more consistent quality parts. Any machinists in the crowd can confirm that. But clearances inside an engine haven't changed in 60 years. Show me clearances from a current engine, and I'll show you the same clearances from 1960's service manuals. And 30 and 40 weight oils have been used in all of them. Although I suspect those tolerances will tighten soon when the new 0w-16 oil hits the market in June.
These are the specs from my LQ1 Chevrolet DOHC 3400 from the late 80s. I'm pretty sure that 60s engines didnt have a Main Thrust Bearing Clearance variation of 17 / 10,000 of an inch. I will be happy to be proven wrong but let's put real numbers up here folks, not guesses. The second column is inches, the first, MM's. 60s engines to now is like comparing the Wright Brothers Flyer to a 747-400.

314076
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,134 Posts
I will be happy to be proven wrong but let's put real numbers up here folks, not guesses. The second column is inches, the first, MM's. 60s engines to now is like comparing the Wright Brothers Flyer to a 747-400.

View attachment 314076
Looks like the engines from the '60s ran even tighter tolerances.
And they ran on 10w40.
Don't be a victim of slick marketing and think newer engines are better than older. Other than ignition and fuel systems, there's not much difference.

image000000(6).jpg
image000000(5).jpg
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,134 Posts
I run 10w40 Castrol GTX. With 75k miles and no issues on a 2013 Frontier 4.0
If I still drove the way I use to drive, I'd probably be running 10w40 also, and to hell with the chain guide concerns. There is a certain peace of mind that comes from knowing you have a thick cushion of oil between moving parts.
And my feeling on the chain guides is just a gut instinct, I have nothing to back up my concerns that his might be a wear point... it just seems logical that the weak spot would be the first point to show the consequences, if any.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
481 Posts
If I still drove the way I use to drive, I'd probably be running 10w40 also, and to hell with the chain guide concerns. There is a certain peace of mind that comes from knowing you have a thick cushion of oil between moving parts.
And my feeling on the chain guides is just a gut instinct, I have nothing to back up my concerns that his might be a wear point... it just seems logical that the weak spot would be the first point to show the consequences, if any.
Exactly.
I also read somewhere, probably bobistheoilguy, that castrol GTX 10w40 conventional outperformed a lot of name brand full synthetic 5w30 and 5w40. That why I use it. Some guy also sold his stash of 0w40 Mobil 1 and now runs GTX 10w40
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
3,188 Posts
I have a 2003 Frontier SVE with 210,000 miles on it, a 2006 Pathfinder with 210,000 miles on it and a 2008 Pathfinder with 240,000 miles on it. I use Walmart's Supertech Full-synthetic 5W30 in all of them with the Pathfinders getting 7500 service intervals. I had an oil sample of the 06 Pathy done at 150,000 miles (7500 on oil) and at 225,000 miles on the 08 Pathfinder (12,000 on oil). Blackstone Labs said both samples looked great; on the 06 they recommended extending it to 9500 mile intervals and on the 08, which had 12,000 miles on the sample, they said it was good but due for changing. I pay $17 for a 5-quart jug and use a Nissan oil filter. The Pathys don't burn oil, smoke nor knock. The Frontier burns some on start-up, which I believe is valve seals, but I didn't take ownership of that until it had 185,000 miles on it. As far as using thicker oil because it gets hot in Kansas, I don't think it gets hot enough in Kansas that it makes much difference whether you use 5W30 or 20W50 in regards to better engine protection. Maybe if it gets near 400 degrees F. in Kansas, it might make a difference, but at that point, I think you'll have bigger issues to worry about than what engine oil your truck has in it! ;)
 
1 - 20 of 36 Posts
Top