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2019, Nissan Frontier SV 4x4, Arctic Blue.
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This is amazing and very helpful! I'm just about to start a very similar project but mount the battery in the truck bed. I may run an accessory wire from the bed (through brake light above the bed) into the back seats so i have the option of both fridge mounting options.... if i can find a good way to seal it.

one question, what did you do with ground from the aux battery? frame, starter battery neutral or onto the engine ground?
Just a general word of wisdom, you do not ever want use a neutral as a ground ever. It is meant to be there as a back up only, and combining the two creates a potential hazard for electric shock, should anything short out. That being said using a clean bare metal portion of the frame is not a bad idea, especially considering the wiring to go back to the engine ground would be a more complicated and unnecessary process.
 

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Martinogg2: I am working on my second battery setup and I bought two 4 gauge wires and ran them from the battery, alongside the frame into the front of the bed. I build a board where I installed my DC to DC charger and a switch panel. I bought negative ground insulated battery junction Post block M8 Studs and connected the ground wire from DC to DC charger and from the primary battery and secondary battery to it. These M8 studs are available on Amazon. I plan on installing a fridge in the bed on a slider. Hope this helps
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The aux. battery will be located to the right side of this board. Another 4 gauge wire will run from the DC charger to the battery. I will run it from behind this board to the battery. A 6 awg wire will be connecting the aux. battery to the switch panel. there is a hole in the back of the box where the positive will be entering the switch panel. The Renogy DC to DC charger has MPPT built into it o a future solar panel can be installed on the roof of my truck feeding the energy to the DC charger. All of the switches have a fuse in them. I brought the positive and negative from the primary battery in the bed through the drain on the front of the bed. It is located behind the board and the plastic cap can be popped out. I drilled a hole in that cap and installed a rubber grommet through which I ran the wires. I am working on the slider and the next purchase would be fridge and battery. Not yet decided to go with an expensive fridge or a cheap one.
 

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That helps alot thanks again, nice setup! Ive heard those DC to DC chargers are even better than the smart chargers. Ive just ran my wires from the starter battery into the truck bed today with 4 gauge wire and started building up my battery box so making steady progress. Yeah i brought them through the rubber grommet at the back right of the bed too, next big step is getting two 10 gauge wires into the cab back seats to run the fridge. thinking through the 3rd light brake light, ive ordered some gland grommets. i dont have a canopy (just bed bars and a RTT) so would like the option of mounting the fridge in both locations
 

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1 more question what fuse size did you use running 4 gauge power? ive a 100amp but thinking i might need 120amp
 

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Just a general word of wisdom, you do not ever want use a neutral as a ground ever. It is meant to be there as a back up only, and combining the two creates a potential hazard for electric shock, should anything short out. That being said using a clean bare metal portion of the frame is not a bad idea, especially considering the wiring to go back to the engine ground would be a more complicated and unnecessary process.
Neutrals and grounds are only relevant in AC wiring at 120vAC and above. Vehicles have no neutral.
 
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1 more question what fuse size did you use running 4 gauge power? ive a 100amp but thinking i might need 120amp
4GA should be fused at a max of 100a for safety. 120a would be possible and should not present a fire hazard, but is not recommended for continuous duty.
 

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Wouldn't you want to know the wattage you'll be consuming before selecting a fuse, as your trying to protect your appliance from burning up right. amps X volts = watts if your only using 50 amps a 100 amp fuse will let your fridge burn up before fuse melts.
 

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Wouldn't you want to know the wattage you'll be consuming before selecting a fuse, as your trying to protect your appliance from burning up right. amps X volts = watts if your only using 50 amps a 100 amp fuse will let your fridge burn up before fuse melts.
Fridge should be fused independently, fused branch line sized and protected according to the measured draw of the branch equipment, just like homes have a central breaker at 200a, etc, and then branches at 15, 20 or 30a each. The main 100 or 120a is to protect the line / circuit running to the cab, truck bed, etc from catching fire if it rubs through and shorts to chassis ground.
 
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Martin: I am using a 100 amp main breaker near the battery. then each switch on the switch panel (pictured above) has its own fuse. In addition, I will add 40 amps fuse going from second battery to the switch panel. It may be overkill but I don't want any mishaps.
 
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