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Discussion Starter #1
I’m shopping around for an LSD. I have a 2006 4.0 king cab, 6 speed, RWD. From what I’ve gathered the diff is a Dana 44 with 32 splines. Is this correct? Will any Dana 44 32 spline LSD fit? Thanks!
 

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No. Not really a dana 44. A derivative of the dana 44.
And you won't find a normal dana 44 with 32 spline axles. The old dana 44 had 30 spline axles.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Gotcha. But how many splines does my modified Dana 44 diff have??

Here are 2 LSD’s that supposedly fit
 

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Gotcha. But how many splines does my modified Dana 44 diff have??
32. You have the M226 axle. Made by Dana/Spicer for Nissan and based on the Dana 44.

Before you buy something, tell us what why you want it. Do you drive mostly on road, occasionally off road, or mostly off road? Do you want something that will automatically work, or would you prefer to activate it only when necessary?

There are various different LSD or locker types and they are suited to different situations.

Even Yukon has three types: Zip selectable air lockers, Grizzly automatic mechanical lockers and Dura Grip clutch type limited slip differentials.

The Speedmaster you link to is a torsen or helical gear limited slip differential. It will only work if both wheels have some traction. The way it works is multiplies the torque at the wheel with low traction and "sends" it to the wheel with traction. The bias ratio on this one is 3.5. So if one wheel is slipping, it will be able to provide 350% of that torque to the wheel with traction. If one wheel completely loses traction (ice or snow, wheel in the air, zero traction) it is unable to transfer torque to the wheel with traction. Zero multiplied by 3.5 is still zero. Torsen diffs are best suited to the street. I have one in my RWD car. It is great, but when it snows, it is not as good. It is a Wavetrac brand so it has an additional clutch in it for the zero traction situation I described above so it is better than a Quaife in those circumstances. I suspect the Speedmaster is similar to the Quaife. These are still a solid choice for on road when both wheels have some traction, but in a truck you will probably get into situations when one wheel has zero or almost zero traction. Eatan Truetrac is another type of helical gear limited slip differential.

There are also automatic mechanical lockers like "Detroit" or "lunchbox" or Yukon Grizzly lockers. These will lock the to wheels together when torque is applied from the drive shaft. This probably would NOT be a good option if you spend any time on road. When making tight turns on pavement your wheels will be locked and it will make is more difficult to turn, tires will wear faster, your tires may "chirp" as they temporarily lose traction, your truck may lurch as the tires bind.

I suspect what you want is a clutch type limited slip differential, like the Yukon one linked to above. These have clutch discs which connect the two wheels mechanically. They are automatic and allow some slip like when navigating a parking lot, but they will be able to apply torque to the wheel with traction even if the other wheel has zero traction. They are commonly known as posi-traction differentials.

In the Pro-4X models the M226 axle comes with a selectable electronic locker. It works similarly to the air locker above, but it uses an electric current instead of air pressure. You could always retrofit one of these. Just run the wires to a switch on the dash.
 

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Before you buy something, tell us what why you want it. Do you drive mostly on road, occasionally off road, or mostly off road? Do you want something that will automatically work, or would you prefer to activate it only when necessary?

There are various different LSD or locker types and they are suited to different situations.

In the Pro-4X models the M226 axle comes with a selectable electronic locker. It works similarly to the air locker above, but it uses an electric current instead of air pressure. You could always retrofit one of these. Just run the wires to a switch on the dash.
^^ Probably this. For most folk the on-demand locking is the best answer for a truck. For a performance automobile, yes, automatic locking is going to be best, the Frontier already has brake-activated "locking" by applying brakes to the freely spinning wheel, so the mechanical locker is kinda "Stage II" for when you really think you're in the crap.
 
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i have been on a trutrac for a good 4-5 years now and i have never had a single bad day with it.
almost completely silent, and as long as both wheels are touching the ground you are good to let both roast.


the thing id like to do to improve on this a bit, is add a hydro ebrake. something im working on this winter
and add a front selectable locker, something im doing end of next summer.


now im not a hardcore crawler guy. i really just love trails overall and being offroad.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
32. You have the M226 axle. Made by Dana/Spicer for Nissan and based on the Dana 44.

Before you buy something, tell us what why you want it. Do you drive mostly on road, occasionally off road, or mostly off road? Do you want something that will automatically work, or would you prefer to activate it only when necessary?

There are various different LSD or locker types and they are suited to different situations.

Even Yukon has three types: Zip selectable air lockers, Grizzly automatic mechanical lockers and Dura Grip clutch type limited slip differentials.

The Speedmaster you link to is a torsen or helical gear limited slip differential. It will only work if both wheels have some traction. The way it works is multiplies the torque at the wheel with low traction and "sends" it to the wheel with traction. The bias ratio on this one is 3.5. So if one wheel is slipping, it will be able to provide 350% of that torque to the wheel with traction. If one wheel completely loses traction (ice or snow, wheel in the air, zero traction) it is unable to transfer torque to the wheel with traction. Zero multiplied by 3.5 is still zero. Torsen diffs are best suited to the street. I have one in my RWD car. It is great, but when it snows, it is not as good. It is a Wavetrac brand so it has an additional clutch in it for the zero traction situation I described above so it is better than a Quaife in those circumstances. I suspect the Speedmaster is similar to the Quaife. These are still a solid choice for on road when both wheels have some traction, but in a truck you will probably get into situations when one wheel has zero or almost zero traction. Eatan Truetrac is another type of helical gear limited slip differential.

There are also automatic mechanical lockers like "Detroit" or "lunchbox" or Yukon Grizzly lockers. These will lock the to wheels together when torque is applied from the drive shaft. This probably would NOT be a good option if you spend any time on road. When making tight turns on pavement your wheels will be locked and it will make is more difficult to turn, tires will wear faster, your tires may "chirp" as they temporarily lose traction, your truck may lurch as the tires bind.

I suspect what you want is a clutch type limited slip differential, like the Yukon one linked to above. These have clutch discs which connect the two wheels mechanically. They are automatic and allow some slip like when navigating a parking lot, but they will be able to apply torque to the wheel with traction even if the other wheel has zero traction. They are commonly known as posi-traction differentials.

In the Pro-4X models the M226 axle comes with a selectable electronic locker. It works similarly to the air locker above, but it uses an electric current instead of air pressure. You could always retrofit one of these. Just run the wires to a switch on the dash.
The truck is my daily but I take it to local trails (dirt, clay, sugar sand) regularly for fast Baja style driving. Going fast I don’t have any trouble (bilstiens all around, sector 8 wheels, Toyo Open Country A/T II’s), but when I slow down one wheel looses traction and digs me in. I also skid easily in the rain. Most of my off reading is done above 20mph, so I’m not looking for a locker. Because of this, I feel like a posi/clutch type would be best for me. Do you agree?
 

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The truck is my daily but I take it to local trails (dirt, clay, sugar sand) regularly for fast Baja style driving. Going fast I don’t have any trouble (bilstiens all around, sector 8 wheels, Toyo Open Country A/T II’s), but when I slow down one wheel looses traction and digs me in. I also skid easily in the rain. Most of my off reading is done above 20mph, so I’m not looking for a locker. Because of this, I feel like a posi/clutch type would be best for me. Do you agree?
IMHO I'd install an electric or pneumatic locker and call it a day. All the benefits of a spool, none of the downsides. Otherwise, yes, clutch-type would probably be your best bet if you want full-time part-posi action.
 
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Discussion Starter #9
32. You have the M226 axle. Made by Dana/Spicer for Nissan and based on the Dana 44.

Before you buy something, tell us what why you want it. Do you drive mostly on road, occasionally off road, or mostly off road? Do you want something that will automatically work, or would you prefer to activate it only when necessary?

There are various different LSD or locker types and they are suited to different situations.

Even Yukon has three types: Zip selectable air lockers, Grizzly automatic mechanical lockers and Dura Grip clutch type limited slip differentials.

The Speedmaster you link to is a torsen or helical gear limited slip differential. It will only work if both wheels have some traction. The way it works is multiplies the torque at the wheel with low traction and "sends" it to the wheel with traction. The bias ratio on this one is 3.5. So if one wheel is slipping, it will be able to provide 350% of that torque to the wheel with traction. If one wheel completely loses traction (ice or snow, wheel in the air, zero traction) it is unable to transfer torque to the wheel with traction. Zero multiplied by 3.5 is still zero. Torsen diffs are best suited to the street. I have one in my RWD car. It is great, but when it snows, it is not as good. It is a Wavetrac brand so it has an additional clutch in it for the zero traction situation I described above so it is better than a Quaife in those circumstances. I suspect the Speedmaster is similar to the Quaife. These are still a solid choice for on road when both wheels have some traction, but in a truck you will probably get into situations when one wheel has zero or almost zero traction. Eatan Truetrac is another type of helical gear limited slip differential.

There are also automatic mechanical lockers like "Detroit" or "lunchbox" or Yukon Grizzly lockers. These will lock the to wheels together when torque is applied from the drive shaft. This probably would NOT be a good option if you spend any time on road. When making tight turns on pavement your wheels will be locked and it will make is more difficult to turn, tires will wear faster, your tires may "chirp" as they temporarily lose traction, your truck may lurch as the tires bind.

I suspect what you want is a clutch type limited slip differential, like the Yukon one linked to above. These have clutch discs which connect the two wheels mechanically. They are automatic and allow some slip like when navigating a parking lot, but they will be able to apply torque to the wheel with traction even if the other wheel has zero traction. They are commonly known as posi-traction differentials.

In the Pro-4X models the M226 axle comes with a selectable electronic locker. It works similarly to the air locker above, but it uses an electric current instead of air pressure. You could always retrofit one of these. Just run the wires to a switch on the dash.
Are Titan differentials similar enough to the M226 to use an LSD made for Titan? I found one which fits 2004-2014 titans and is 32 spline.
 

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Are Titan differentials similar enough to the M226 to use an LSD made for Titan? I found one which fits 2004-2014 titans and is 32 spline.
They're exactly the same. The Titan axle tubes are just longer.
 
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They're exactly the same. The Titan axle tubes are just longer.
Will the elocker meant for earlier NISMO's fit into a standard M226? Apparently the one I found is for M226 diff's with "unequal length axel shafts." Here's the link. I can't tell from the description if the diff has to be from a NISMO in order to fit.


If it will fit, what else will I need in order to install? Anyone know the part number for the control wire?
 

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If you are actually driving off road a selectable locker cannot be beat. If you have questions on converting an open M226 to a factory e-locker, contact Steve at Rugged Rocks. I have never dealt with him, but have heard good things.

A clutch LSD would probably help, but especially if you are driving fast in low traction situations I would worry about overheating the fluid. In certain situations where clutch type LSDs are used an auxiliary pump and heat exchanger is used to regulate the fluid temp. Seems like a lot of trouble for what you are looking for.

If you are mostly driving in situations where all wheels are on the ground a helical gear LSD might also be a good choice. They advantage is it is always active. Disadvantage is limited torque biasing capability dependent on the wheel with the least traction. I wonder how these work with the Nissan ALBS (ABLS?) system. If the truck applies the brakes to the wheel with no traction, this would help overcome the limitation of this type of LSD. This option would also be really good on road. A selectable locker would be of limited usefulness on road. Humvees come with helical gear lockers and I have heard if you get in a situation where you have lifted wheels the SOP is to apply the throttle and the brake simultaneously. The braking on the wheel in the air will allow torque to be transferred (3.5x the braking torque for the Speedmaster) to the wheel with traction.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
If you are actually driving off road a selectable locker cannot be beat. If you have questions on converting an open M226 to a factory e-locker, contact Steve at Rugged Rocks. I have never dealt with him, but have heard good things.

A clutch LSD would probably help, but especially if you are driving fast in low traction situations I would worry about overheating the fluid. In certain situations where clutch type LSDs are used an auxiliary pump and heat exchanger is used to regulate the fluid temp. Seems like a lot of trouble for what you are looking for.

If you are mostly driving in situations where all wheels are on the ground a helical gear LSD might also be a good choice. They advantage is it is always active. Disadvantage is limited torque biasing capability dependent on the wheel with the least traction. I wonder how these work with the Nissan ALBS (ABLS?) system. If the truck applies the brakes to the wheel with no traction, this would help overcome the limitation of this type of LSD. This option would also be really good on road. A selectable locker would be of limited usefulness on road. Humvees come with helical gear lockers and I have heard if you get in a situation where you have lifted wheels the SOP is to apply the throttle and the brake simultaneously. The braking on the wheel in the air will allow torque to be transferred (3.5x the braking torque for the Speedmaster) to the wheel with traction.
I did speak to Steve a few days ago. His advice was to go with ARB locker, so that’s what I’m going to do. it turns out the NISMO elocker requires unequal length axels, and that’s not worth the trouble. I appreciate all of y’all’s advice!!
 
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