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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
My horn and steering wheel buttons don't work, I checked the fuse's and they are good. Previous owner said it's the horn ring. I'm going to swap the steering wheel from my parts truck. How do i remove the steering wheel? 98 Frontier 4x4 manual 4cyl.
 

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You didn't mention if you had an air bag or not, so I'm assuming you do. Disconnect the battery cable and let sit for 10 minutes. Remove the side covers (or switches, if equipped) on the sides of the steering wheel to access the bolts that hold the air bag module. You'll need Torx T-50X socket to get the tamper-proof Torx bolts out (new bolts are recommended by Nissan when you reinstall them...FYI. Nissan P/N 01141-00411). Remove the bolts and lift the air bag module upward from the steering wheel. Unplug the connectors and put the air bag on a surface in a safe place where it won't fall off and make sure the back side of the module is facing down. Remove the steering column nut and use a steering wheel puller to remove the steering wheel. If you feel strong and don't want to use the puller, loosen but don't completely remove the steering column nut (unless you like a steering wheel to end up in your face). Brace your legs and grab each side of the wheel and pull back with all your might, rocking the wheel back and forth as you pull. The wheel will break loose, hopefully. Remove the nut and then the steering wheel. FYI, there is no "horn ring" if you do have an air bag; you are more likely to have a bad clock spring assembly, which Nissan parts catalog refers to as a "wire assembly-steering air bag."

https://www.nissanpartsdeal.com/par...l-unit.html?Filter=(2=KA24DE)&Diagram=253_002
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
You didn't mention if you had an air bag or not, so I'm assuming you do. Disconnect the battery cable and let sit for 10 minutes. Remove the side covers (or switches, if equipped) on the sides of the steering wheel to access the bolts that hold the air bag module. You'll need Torx T-50X socket to get the tamper-proof Torx bolts out (new bolts are recommended by Nissan when you reinstall them...FYI. Nissan P/N 01141-00411). Remove the bolts and lift the air bag module upward from the steering wheel. Unplug the connectors and put the air bag on a surface in a safe place where it won't fall off and make sure the back side of the module is facing down. Remove the steering column nut and use a steering wheel puller to remove the steering wheel. If you feel strong and don't want to use the puller, loosen but don't completely remove the steering column nut (unless you like a steering wheel to end up in your face). Brace your legs and grab each side of the wheel and pull back with all your might, rocking the wheel back and forth as you pull. The wheel will break loose, hopefully. Remove the nut and then the steering wheel. FYI, there is no "horn ring" if you do have an air bag; you are more likely to have a bad clock spring assembly, which Nissan parts catalog refers to as a "wire assembly-steering air bag."

https://www.nissanpartsdeal.com/par...l-unit.html?Filter=(2=KA24DE)&Diagram=253_002
I really appreciate the info, thank you. You put in part numbers that is amazing.

Yes there is an airbag, and the airbag light is on, it doesn't flash just stays on. Yaah i was wondering what a "horn ring" was myself. What with the amount of work involved to get to the clock spring assembly and how dangerous airbags are. I will have to dive deeper into properly trouble shooting the problem. The steering wheel also has a hair of axial play. Again thanks for the info.
 

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All of the wiring for the air bags, steering wheel switches and horn go through the clock spring, so, it's very likely that's the problem. A horn ring was used on older vehicles, when the only electric parts on the steering wheel was the horn pad and contacts. A spring loaded, metal pin pressed against a metal ring, which provided a constant electrical circuit while the steering wheel was turned. Since there was only one circuit, this worked out fine. Once they started adding more switches and components to the steering wheel, a simple horn ring wouldn't work, so, the clock spring (or "spiral cable") was created to handle the multiple circuits.
 
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