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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi guys so Im gonna try doing a fuel filter i was reading around and was wondering is it necessary to disconnect the fuel pump fuse? If so where is it located on a 2002 2.4l ka24 and if there any tips and tricks you guys can throw at me will be very thankful!
 

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The fuse diagram is on the back of the fuse panel door. You have to pull the fuse and then start it and let it run until it stalls. This will relieve the pressure in the lines. The rest is common sense. Replace the filter and the fuse and start it up. It may stall and need to be restarted to build up pressure in the lines. Be sure to check for leaks.
 

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The fuel filter on these is underneath, on the inside of one of the two frame rails. Get underneath about the center of the bed and look towards the sides. Best I've found is to loosen the bracket from the rail. On my '98, when purchased at 100K miles, the fuel filter was the original Nissan and the hose clamps faced upward, installed before the bed was attached. Same on my 2004 (both are same engine as yours).

Anyway, I've never pulled the fuse or run until it stalls from lack of fuel. I wear safety glasses in case there's a burst of gas at initial loosening (which hasn't happened), and work quickly. Obviously, be aware that gasoline is flammable and explosive.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thank you both so much and once the new one is installed everything should start up
Properly? And work good as new? And also check for leaks around the little clamps that hold the hoses in place with filter or check for leaks through the whole line?





The fuel filter on these is underneath, on the inside of one of the two frame rails. Get underneath about the center of the bed and look towards the sides. Best I've found is to loosen the bracket from the rail. On my '98, when purchased at 100K miles, the fuel filter was the original Nissan and the hose clamps faced upward, installed before the bed was attached. Same on my 2004 (both are same engine as yours).

Anyway, I've never pulled the fuse or run until it stalls from lack of fuel. I wear safety glasses in case there's a burst of gas at initial loosening (which hasn't happened), and work quickly. Obviously, be aware that gasoline is flammable and explosive.
 

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No matter your approach, always assume there is pressure in the lines. Be ready for a spray of fuel when you disconnect the hoses (place your free hand over the connection or block it somehow). I removed the fuse and ran the engine before I replaced the fuel filter on my 2004. I ended up with a face and ear full of gas. Fortunately I was wearing safety glasses and was able to quickly run inside and shower.
 

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Anyway, I've never pulled the fuse or run until it stalls from lack of fuel. I wear safety glasses in case there's a burst of gas at initial loosening (which hasn't happened), and work quickly. Obviously, be aware that gasoline is flammable and explosive.
I'll add that one should also cover the fitting connection with a rag when first loosening the clamp or connection so fuel doesn't spray, even with safety glasses.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
My clamps are face up too how did you get to yours?








The fuel filter on these is underneath, on the inside of one of the two frame rails. Get underneath about the center of the bed and look towards the sides. Best I've found is to loosen the bracket from the rail. On my '98, when purchased at 100K miles, the fuel filter was the original Nissan and the hose clamps faced upward, installed before the bed was attached. Same on my 2004 (both are same engine as yours).

Anyway, I've never pulled the fuse or run until it stalls from lack of fuel. I wear safety glasses in case there's a burst of gas at initial loosening (which hasn't happened), and work quickly. Obviously, be aware that gasoline is flammable and explosive.
 

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My clamps are face up too how did you get to yours?
Too bad, so dummmm, so stoooopid !!

I unbolted the bracket and rotated the whole thing like 90 degrees and then was able to get the clamps loose. I can't remember what kind of clamps were originally on there, but know I have regular worm-type hose clamps on it now. Yes, my new clamps face downwards !!!
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
I work on my truck a lot and I must say they put some parts in weird places and pain in the a** places like alternator I had to replace and that was a project I didn’t take any hoses off because I didn’t wanna make a
Mess with radiator fluid and so on so that was a interesting little thing haha.



My clamps are face up too how did you get to yours?
Too bad, so dummmm, so stoooopid !!

I unbolted the bracket and rotated the whole thing like 90 degrees and then was able to get the clamps loose. I can't remember what kind of clamps were originally on there, but know I have regular worm-type hose clamps on it now. Yes, my new clamps face downwards !!!
 

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One thing I do is after the clamps are loose, I spray the hoses on the fittings with some carb cleaner, which softens the hose a little and makes it easier to break loose from the fitting. If you should happen to replace the clamps, make sure they are fuel injection hose clamps, and not just standard worm-gear clamps. The same goes for any time you have to replace a hose; make sure it's fuel injection hose and not standard fuel hose.
 

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once the new one is installed everything should start up Properly?

It probably doesn’t make much difference, but you may want to turn the key to run and wait for the fuel pump to stop running before you start it for the first time to prime the system.



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I work on my truck a lot and I must say they put some parts in weird places and pain in the a** places like alternator I had to replace and that was a project I didn’t take any hoses off because I didn’t wanna make a
Mess with radiator fluid and so on so that was a interesting little thing haha.
Changing out the pcv valve is loads of fun.


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One thing I do is after the clamps are loose, I spray the hoses on the fittings with some carb cleaner, which softens the hose a little and makes it easier to break loose from the fitting. If you should happen to replace the clamps, make sure they are fuel injection hose clamps, and not just standard worm-gear clamps. The same goes for any time you have to replace a hose; make sure it's fuel injection hose and not standard fuel hose.


Smj, why cant we use regular hose clamps. I just changed my filter and replaced the clamps with hose clamps. Should i go buy some fuel injections clamps instead.
 

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Smj, why cant we use regular hose clamps. I just changed my filter and replaced the clamps with hose clamps. Should i go buy some fuel injections clamps instead.
For starters, regular worm gear clamps tend to cut into and damage the exterior of the hose where the slots are. Fuel injection hose clamps don't cut up the section of the hose they are securing, are designed for higher pressures associated with fuel injection systems and provide more even pressure (than worm gear clamps) around the hose, providing a better seal between the hose and the metal line to which they are being connected. Also, most FI clamps are stainless steel to provide good resistance to corrosion. If you want to do the job correctly, then replace those worm gear clamps with fuel injection hose clamps; I would cut the end of the hose off that was under the worm gear clamp to make sure there are no cuts in the section of hose where the new clamps will be installed. A few, fuel injection hose clamps are a lot cheaper and safer than a potential fire due to a high-pressure fuel leak caused by using the incorrect parts!
 
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Fuel injection clamp:
 

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Fuel injection clamp:
I believe mine have regular worm-style hose clamps, but I'd have to check. In any event: if the hose clamps on mine were OK, I likely just re-used them, just oriented them how I wanted them.
 

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I believe mine have regular worm-style hose clamps, but I'd have to check. In any event: if the hose clamps on mine were OK, I likely just re-used them, just oriented them how I wanted them.
Yes, I used the original clamps on my 1998 Frontier, confirmed that today.

My 1998 also was overdue for a fuel filter replacement (75K on it) so I did that today as well. Nissan is exceedingly dumb in my opinion in the engineering of this, the bracket is in the way of replacing the fuel filter. I've reported that when I got this truck at 100K, the fuel filter had never been replaced, its clamp screws were facing up and essentially impossible to access. It's all designed to be installed before the bed goes on, and screw those trying to do this later on.

So this time I wised up, finally got fed up, so I reversed the bracket to underneath so it wouldn't block access to the fuel filter, yet still secures the filter in place. I drilled three holes in the support bar and used three #12 hex head sheet metal screws after drilling 9/64" holes.
 
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