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Discussion Starter #1
I've been searching for some sort of alternative to the ARB locker for the c200k for some time now. Today I finally hit the magic keywords, or the gods smiled on me, or whatever and I came across this: https://www.4x4parts.com/i-23898610-c200k-31-spline-lunch-box-locker.html

It says in the description that it would fit my 2014 SV 4x4 automatic...but there's really not much info on the product itself. I've emailed the company asking for more info so I'll post that when I get a response, but I'm just wondering if anyone has one of these installed and if its good, bad? The only reason I'm considering it is because it is on a reputable website, and lack of alternatives. I know its an autolocker and that it can/will be quirky, but I'm willing to put up with it.

Any info or suggestions would be much appreciated.
 

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I've been searching for some sort of alternative to the ARB locker for the c200k for some time now. Today I finally hit the magic keywords, or the gods smiled on me, or whatever and I came across this: https://www.4x4parts.com/i-23898610-c200k-31-spline-lunch-box-locker.html

It says in the description that it would fit my 2014 SV 4x4 automatic...but there's really not much info on the product itself. I've emailed the company asking for more info so I'll post that when I get a response, but I'm just wondering if anyone has one of these installed and if its good, bad? The only reason I'm considering it is because it is on a reputable website, and lack of alternatives. I know its an autolocker and that it can/will be quirky, but I'm willing to put up with it.

Any info or suggestions would be much appreciated.
Here is a thread on the topic
http://www.clubfrontier.org/forums/f8/frontier-spartan-locker-60301/

Possible a power trax locker. One of the only ones I see that fits a C200k
http://www.clubfrontier.org/forums/f62/attention-do-not-order-c200k-powertrax-locker-73394/

There is a lot of talk about having a rear auto locker to be a PITA to drive. Read JrNevadas accounts of having a rear spartan locker in her truck. Lokka actually recommends if you were to have 1 auto locker have it in the front so that most of the time you are not affected by the locker and can power through tight corners and u-turns.

Frequently Asked Questions - LOKKA

"Q10. Which end should I fit first? (if buying one)
This is dependent on the vehicle, its existing differential types, the type of suspension system, LOKKA model availability and the type of 4x4 driving you do.
However, often the front is the first choice.

If the vehicle is an IFS (Independent Front Suspension) model then the front fitment will result in the greatest increase in 4x4 ability. This is because many IFS vehicles have very limited suspension movement (hence limited wheel travel and articulation) resulting in easily lifted wheels and total loss of front traction. Fitting a LOKKA to the front will solve this serious deficiency.
If a vehicle has a good quality LSD in the rear, then a front fitment will obviously provide the best total traction ie. one locker and one LSD is better than one locker and one standard differential.
If a vehicle has a poor quality LSD then the issue becomes less clear and personal preference or ease of installation often become the more important criteria. However one LSD and one locker is still a better choice - if that is possible.
If the vehicle is a constant 4x4 then a rear fitment may be the easiest solution from a fitting perspective, but may not be the best solution from a traction perspective.*
A front fitment will actually yield the greatest improvement in off road ability. This is because, most vehicles require the increase in traction (that a locker gives) when hill climbing. Under hill climbing conditions, due to the angle of the vehicle, the rear wheels are carrying a much greater weight (weight transfer) and the front wheels are therefore carrying a lessor weight and tend to break traction more easily.
Once one front wheel starts to spin, the other front wheel stops turning and the front differential ceases to provide traction. At this point all power load is transferred onto the rear wheels as if it were a 2x4 and due to this increased load, the rear wheels are encouraged to spin and the vehicle stops.
If you can solve the problem of the front wheels losing traction, you have solved the traction problem.
Another advantage is that on road there are no changes to normal driving characteristics – assuming it has Free Wheel Hubs or a Disconnect Mechanism,


* Q10 d. - Extra info
A couple of things to Note: the front diff lock (any type) will give the greatest advantage off road, rather than the rear, assuming most vehicles have greater problems going up hill rather than down.
Two are better than one, but one in the front is better than one in the rear.

This is due in part to the transfer of weight onto the rear wheels, thereby providing greater 'natural' traction as the weight pushes the rear wheels into the terrain. The steeper the slope, the greater the weight transfer.

In addition the front wheels usually have less wheel travel than the rears, so they tend to lift off the ground as the rear drops into holes. As soon as they do, the drive load is rapidly doubled on the rear wheels, as all the front drive is lost to the wheel spinning in the air or on the loose surface, and the front wheel still on hard ground has no drive.
All the load of moving the vehicle is on the rear wheels. The rapid transfer of this load encourages the rear wheels to break traction - forward motion is stopped.

Also remember the front wheels get to the worst part of the track first - assuming you are going forward. The loose gravel, the sandy bit, the tree root, rock ledge, the slippery mud etc etc all these will get one front wheel spinning first, then the other front wheel not being driven, the load on the rear wheels rapidly doubles. The resulting rapid transfer of load encourages the rear to break traction again - forward motion is stopped.

Putting any locker into the rear does nothing to stop the front losing traction, it just makes the vehicle a lot better 2x4, better at pushing from the rear. Even if you can only keep one wheel driving at the front, you will probably have three wheels working and spreading the driving load over the greater surface area of three tires."
 

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Discussion Starter #3
So I heard back from 4x4parts.com and it is a Trax locker.

"Thank you for your interest in our products. It is made by Trax and is made specifically for C200K, if you want we also have ARB locker in stock and we do have specials on ARB locker which is far more superior units to any thing else on the market.

If you wish to order please let us know.

thank you

Mike

Automotive Customizers

www.4x4parts.com

954-971-3510"


I've seen the threads you linked above and the one about PowerTrax lockers is 6 years old. Maybe they've got their **** together since then? If they hadn't fixed them then I would assume they would have just stopped making them after their first production fail talked about in that thread. Has anyone besides the author of that thread installed one on these forums? If so, step forward and tell us your story!
 

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Discussion Starter #5
No I'm definitely not anti front locker, they're just generally a much more pita to install. I would love a front locker.

I'm just curious about this product because as far as I know there is only the arb locker, the trax auto locker, and a lsd that came out last year...that's it.
 

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I've had the same experience from 4x4 parts. In reality if you call them they will be a little more forthcoming with their experience with the Powertrax auto locker. They have had a lot of fitment issues with them and claim about 25% install success rate with them and a 75% return rate with angry customers who claim that the locker was wrong for their C200K diff. I cancelled my order for the auto locker and just saved my nickels and dimes and now have ARB lockers front and rear. I know it's a big ecpense but it's the only way to get what you truly want. For those who can't financially do the ARB option I'd agree that the Lokka front auto locker is the way to go. Also don't discount what our trucks are capable of with the ABSLS. You'll see a lot of nay sayers here about it but the bottom line is, it was the difference between being stuck and not on a few different occasions for me. Stand outside a vehicle that has it on a muddy hill climb then a vehicle on the same hill with open diffs. You won't doubt what they do after that. Of course they aren't a true locker but until we have options that our Toyota brethren seem to have we have to muddle through.
 

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I've had the same experience from 4x4 parts. In reality if you call them they will be a little more forthcoming with their experience with the Powertrax auto locker. They have had a lot of fitment issues with them and claim about 25% install success rate with them and a 75% return rate with angry customers who claim that the locker was wrong for their C200K diff. I cancelled my order for the auto locker and just saved my nickels and dimes and now have ARB lockers front and rear. I know it's a big ecpense but it's the only way to get what you truly want. For those who can't financially do the ARB option I'd agree that the Lokka front auto locker is the way to go. Also don't discount what our trucks are capable of with the ABSLS. You'll see a lot of nay sayers here about it but the bottom line is, it was the difference between being stuck and not on a few different occasions for me. Stand outside a vehicle that has it on a muddy hill climb then a vehicle on the same hill with open diffs. You won't doubt what they do after that. Of course they aren't a true locker but until we have options that our Toyota brethren seem to have we have to muddle through.
was going to ask, I assume that you went with lockers because you did overcome the capabilities of ABSLS. How striking was the difference?

My concern with any of the passive lockers and ABSLS is that the combined systems will essentially second-guess each other, and if a passive locker engages once a bit of wheelspin occurs, the ABSLS will try to interrupt the wheelspin too, and the differential will act as if it's open again more readily than with a powered locker like the ARB unit or the stock locker in the M226 axle.
 

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I installed a lokka into a front r180 diff on my bench top. Took a couple of leisure nights in a spare diff. Was not very hard to do. I have yet to install the diff into my truck though. Another options would be to buy a full m266 axle from a nismo/pro4x with a e-locker. I priced them out a while ago about about $1000k. Cheaper than a ARB and some would consider it an upgrade.
 

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The ABSLS, as many have experienced, applies the braking system to stop the spinning wheel and force traction to the non-spinning wheel. It does limit your ability to throttle out of a situation. That's a major negative for the ABSLS system. Also I prefer to pull the fuse for the ABS when off road for safety reasons which kills the ABSLS. The ARB lockers are on demand and you can leave the rear locked and turn the front on when needed. True lockers are ideal for off-road but I'd say one of your last mods. Front and rear bumpers, lift, skids and rock sliders are my short list of mods needed to tackle moderate trails. Lockers are great but if you don't have these first you're missing the boat. With that said the ARB's are night and day all around in the tough stuff. They also replace the fragile spider gears with nearly bulletproof ones in our R180 front diff as well as the adequate but still breakable C200K stock gears. I believe the Lokka locker replaces the spider gears on the front diff with much tougher ones too. M226 with electric lockers are a good option but I can never find one around my part of the country. They have inherent problems as you can read on this site but it is a superior rear end with more options as far as upgrades.
 

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True lockers are ideal for off-road but I'd say one of your last mods. Front and rear bumpers, lift, skids and rock sliders are my short list of mods needed to tackle moderate trails. Lockers are great but if you don't have these first you're missing the boat.
Trouble is, I have been in situations that disagree with your assertion that lockers are the last upgrade. One of the factors motivating me was a trip we took to visit geological formations out in the forests around us, and we got hit with a freak April snowstorm. The trails through the forests and scrub turned into creeks and under-truck body armor wasn't the issue, losing traction on a wheel and thus having wheelspin was. One guy got his Tundra stuck by sliding sideways into a ditch and getting it out was entertaining with how slippery it was.

Every major kind of terrain has different problems, and some things are needed for some before they're needed for others.
 

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My concern with any of the passive lockers and ABSLS is that the combined systems will essentially second-guess each other, and if a passive locker engages once a bit of wheelspin occurs, the ABSLS will try to interrupt the wheelspin too, and the differential will act as if it's open again more readily than with a powered locker like the ARB unit or the stock locker in the M226 axle.

I ran a Spartan auto locker (M226) for several years and wheeled the heck out of it. I never encountered anything like what you’re describing.
 

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Agreed. Every situation is different and different mods can help in different situations. Did you have issues where you were needing a pull from someone?

A winch may have been handier to help you and your Tundra friend out than you having lockers for example. Also lunch box lockers are not great for winter weather (especially on road where people use their trucks the most). Obviously you know best what your truck needs. Definitely do the upgrades you think best. If you are set on lunchbox lockers I'd go with Lokka on the front like others pointed out, at least until we have better options that have a better chance at fitting out trucks rear end.

I like bumpers first because if you need recovery points for a winch or tow from a stuck position you have them and also have a place to jack up from if you plan on using a hilift jack for your recovery. Lockers are also great for getting your truck hopelessly stuck, again where stock bumpers and no winch can be a problem.

Did you get any pics of your journey and of your Tundra friends predicament?
 

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Also, if you do get yourself the Powertrax locker let the rest of us know how it fit. Maybe even do a detailed description of the project on a new thread. There are so many outdated threads of problems that no longer exist. I wish there was a way to get rid of some like the 2010 Powertrax thread...
 

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Agreed. Every situation is different and different mods can help in different situations. Did you have issues where you were needing a pull from someone?

A winch may have been handier to help you and your Tundra friend out than you having lockers for example. Also lunch box lockers are not great for winter weather (especially on road where people use their trucks the most). Obviously you know best what your truck needs. Definitely do the upgrades you think best. If you are set on lunchbox lockers I'd go with Lokka on the front like others pointed out, at least until we have better options that have a better chance at fitting out trucks rear end.

I like bumpers first because if you need recovery points for a winch or tow from a stuck position you have them and also have a place to jack up from if you plan on using a hilift jack for your recovery. Lockers are also great for getting your truck hopelessly stuck, again where stock bumpers and no winch can be a problem.

Did you get any pics of your journey and of your Tundra friends predicament?
Didn't really get any pictures. This was back in 2014 or so, we were in my folks '99 Tracker, which is about the smallest BOF, traditional transfer case 4x4 SUV made at the time. We were slipping all over the place.

I ended up driving his truck out of the ditch. Had to get a running start, steer to the right to get the right side wheels up on the shoulder, then steer left hard to bounce through the ditch and back on to the road. Took three times if I remember right and I had to keep backing up to retry because there was a drainage pipe under the road that I needed to avoid.
 

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Thanks OverlandFronty. Now. I have another question. Since this locks up when torque is applied, i.e. under acceleration, let's say I'm on dry pavement, taking a corner. Maybe I'm driving a little hot, I come to the corner, I let off the gas, half way through, I get back on the throttle. Remember, I'm driving a little hot. So, I give it some go juice. Won't this lock up? Won't that be a bad thing?
 

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You will get the traction control that will take over but the ABSLS only is active in 4wd. You can turn the traction control off with the traction control switch if you’re into drifting and doughnuts in 2wd. I’m not 100% that all 2nd gen Frontiers have both or either. I’m 80% sure though. :)
 
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