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I asked my service department about what this would cost and the head service writer told me that nissan says not to flush the brake fluid. I thought he said that they got sent a bulletin telling them not too. This seems a little odd, but they are a pretty good dealership so I trust what he said. Can anyone else confirm this with their dealer?
 

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I asked my service department about what this would cost and the head service writer told me that nissan says not to flush the brake fluid. I thought he said that they got sent a bulletin telling them not too. This seems a little odd, but they are a pretty good dealership so I trust what he said. Can anyone else confirm this with their dealer?
I know on some vechicles you are not supposed to "power" flush the brake fluid, but you can still flush them using other methods. Brake fluid is probably one of the most ignored fluids (along with PS fluid), but it seems like it would be good to have it changed periodically (I think it's listed in my maintenance schedule -- I'll have to look up the interval).
 

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I know on some vechicles you are not supposed to "power" flush the brake fluid ...
I think you're correct -- it's all about how the procedure is done. Service departments seem to have the "flushing" process advertised everywhere on everything these days -- it's the phrase that pays. But as Zero Six LE says, the stuff needs to be replaced nonetheless and I'll bet that doing it the old fashioned way is just fine.
 

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I would just use a vacuum pump to replace my brake fluid. It draws the fluid from the bleeder valve. I would use Speed bleeders if I could find out what size I need. ...
Holy cow -- Speed Bleeders has a NEAT product idea and rather reasonably priced too.
 

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well Ford, Jaguar etc dont follow that guideline, but Jaguar will pay and is included as maintainance to flush system every 24 months. You cannot keep brake fluid from absorbing moisture which reduces boiling point, causes corrosion etc. Its hydoscopic meaning it absorbs moisture from the air. When I flush a system, I suck out the reservoir of old fluid with a $2 handheld squeeze bulb, then pour in fresh new fluid, hook up adapter to reservoir and pressurize my brake bleeder to 10psi and open each bleeder valve till new fluid comes out. once all 4 are done so am I....
 

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my SVX had a bad cap on the brake fluid container and it got lots of water in it. Brakes just locked up after about 20 minutes of driving SUCKED ***.

Easy fix though.
 

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Color is not always a indicator of condition, but my 04,s brake fluid was black at 32k when I decided to flush it for the 1st time.

I used Vavoline SynPower brake fluid ,and at 46k it is still clear.
 

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Color is not always a indicator of condition, but my 04,s brake fluid was black at 32k when I decided to flush it for the 1st time.

I used Vavoline SynPower brake fluid ,and at 46k it is still clear.

Black is not the color of good fluid though. Anything far from clear can't be very good for long term usage. The vehicles that don't get regular fluid exchanges will normally have problems with wheel cylinders and calipers.
 

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I agree.
Im ocd about vehicle mantinence.
All of my fluids were changed well before the manual suggested ,and all have been upgraded.
Amsoil in the diff, engine ,and trans.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
The truck was at the dealer today so I asked the head service writer about again and he printed up the service bulletin for me to show me he wasn't lying. Dated 12/12/07 with reference number NPSB/07-027. In bold it states "Nissan North America does not advocate the use of aftermarket flushing systems and strongly advises against performing these services on any Nissan or Infinity vehicle, except as noted in the Service Maintenance Guide (SMG)."

There's a bunch of other stuff it says about flushes and Nissan engineering including that flushes are mostly done for business's to make a profit. The main thing they say is to follow the service schedules that come with your vehicle.
 

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They are most likely refering to machines.
I did mine the old fashioned way.

Start with the wheel farthest from the master cylinder which is the back right, and end with the wheel closest which is the left front.

I had my buddy pump the brakes until clear fluid poured out,and then close the bleeder back up.
Once ive got clean fluid pouring from all 4 wheels I will go back ,and bleed each one to make sure no air got in.
 

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The truck was at the dealer today so I asked the head service writer about again and he printed up the service bulletin for me to show me he wasn't lying. Dated 12/12/07 with reference number NPSB/07-027. In bold it states "Nissan North America does not advocate the use of aftermarket flushing systems and strongly advises against performing these services on any Nissan or Infinity vehicle, except as noted in the Service Maintenance Guide (SMG)."

There's a bunch of other stuff it says about flushes and Nissan engineering including that flushes are mostly done for business's to make a profit. The main thing they say is to follow the service schedules that come with your vehicle.
Reading that I gather that they mean mechanically or chemical assisted flushes. It doesn't mean not to change the fluid. When you get the fluid changed out you have to flush out the old fluid in the lines with new fluid. Simply drawing out the old fluid through the bleeders until the new fluid flows is all it takes. Its standard brake maintanance. I would think twice about dealing with that dealership if they can't figure out what that bulletin means. Maybe its a rookie working for them or something. Either way I wouldn't want them working on my truck.
 

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Discussion Starter #16
Reading that I gather that they mean mechanically or chemical assisted flushes. It doesn't mean not to change the fluid. When you get the fluid changed out you have to flush out the old fluid in the lines with new fluid. Simply drawing out the old fluid through the bleeders until the new fluid flows is all it takes. Its standard brake maintanance. I would think twice about dealing with that dealership if they can't figure out what that bulletin means. Maybe its a rookie working for them or something. Either way I wouldn't want them working on my truck.
Yeah I reread the bulletin and it sounds like they are mostly referring to aftermarket flush machines, but I also asked about changing/bleeding the fluid. They said it's not needed unless your fluid is contaminated or your brake pedal feel changes noticeably.
 

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I Agree, I Say You Should Never Ever Change The Fluid. I Meen If You Dont Change The Fluid Then I Could Replace Calipers, Master Cylinders, And Abs Valve Blocks More Often And Make Some Really Good Money.. So Please Everyone Do Not Change The Brake Fluid Evaaaaarrrrrrr.
 

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Discussion Starter #18
I Agree, I Say You Should Never Ever Change The Fluid. I Meen If You Dont Change The Fluid Then I Could Replace Calipers, Master Cylinders, And Abs Valve Blocks More Often And Make Some Really Good Money.. So Please Everyone Do Not Change The Brake Fluid Evaaaaarrrrrrr.
Lol, I'm just letting everyone know what my Nissan dealer told me, and trying to find out why they said that.
 

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Lol My Honest Feeling About This Is If You Dont Suck Out The Fluid From The Master Cylinder First You Run The Risk Of Running Something(dirt Etc) Into Abs Valving And Creating A Warranty Part Return Costing Nissan Money. So In Their Eyes You Wont Ever Really Have An Issue With Brake Fluid Causing A Part To Fail When Under Warranty In The Brake System Due To Corrosion. So Its Better To Not Do It And Reduce What May Be Warranty Returns Due To Flushing Dirt Into System And Causing Problems. This Also Bring Up A Good Point Too, When Possible I Like To Open Bleeder Screws When Pushing, Or Screwing In Caliper Pistons. Makes Easy To Retract Them And Also Doesnt Risk Pushing Crappy Caliper Fluid Up Into System. Just Be Sure To Either Bleed When Done Or Make Sure That You Leave Bleeder Open Long Enough To Get Any Air Out That May Have Gone In When You Stopped Pushing The Piston In.
 
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