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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hey guys, I'm having some weird issues with my truck not cranking. It's a 2000 4x4 V6. Let me explain:

After work the other day I got a no click no crank. No problem- I get a jump, she starts right up and I go home. Then I pulled the battery and put it on my Yuasa charger, expecting it to take the usual 12+ hours to charge. Except... the charger says the battery is full. Weird.

So then I was thinking starter, but just to be sure I got the battery out of my Toyota pickup (anyone want to by a Toyota? lol) and tried that. Now, this battery is smaller and has less cold cranking amps, somewhere around 650, but it should be enough to turn over the Nissan. I charged it for about an hour until it was full at 13v and go figure the Nissan cranks right up. So at this point I'm thinking its a bad cell in the original battery, except this morning she wouldn't start AGAIN, even with the charged Toyota battery. What the heck is going on here?

It was cold last night, around 35F. Is it possible the first test, when the battery was full, used up just enough juice so that in the morning when the battery was cold it wouldn't start?

Plan on getting the batteries tested at Autozone later today to see if one or both are bad. If the first one is bad then I know my Toyota battery doesn't have quite enough amperage and I'll have to buy a bigger battery. Any other ideas?
 

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Have Autozone test the battery. Sounds like a bad cell or cells. Voltage could be good, but not have enough CCA to start the truck. Also how old are the batteries?
 

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1st off, 35 isn't "cold"

secondly, charging a rarely used battery for one hour isn't giving it a full charge. Then using it to start an engine probably ran it right back down.

third, how old is the battery in your truck?

Have your battery tested and go from there.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
The Toyota battery is almost brand new, less than 6 months. The Nissan says 2015 on it and I'm assuming the dealer had it put in because they bought the truck from auction, probably had a dead battery. The original battery must have a dead cell, but I found it odd that my Toyota battery wouldn't turn it over more than once considering it's relatively new. How many CCAs do these trucks need?
 

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What condition are the connections in, are they corroded or covered in blue/green gunk? Really want to know what is happening to the voltage right at the battery when you turn the key...
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
The connections are good, zero corrosion. I used a wire brush on the contacts just to be sure but its in good shape.
 

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If when it's not cranking there is NO CLICK, NO NOISE of any type then I would first check the safety switch on the clutch pedal, and pedal must be pressed all the way down (Mrs. Cusser once walked home 4 miles because she hadn't pressed the clutch pedal down far enough, and the '98 wouldn't crank, she learned that lesson the hard way). Unless I missed it, don't know what transmission type you have, so if automatic check the neutral safety switch , jiggle the shift lever a bit and try.


For what it's worth: about a decade ago I had intermittent starting issues on my 1998 Frontier, and it needed a new starter. That starter is still working.
 

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Nissan batteries are sketchy at best, they are not maintenance free and I have had three quit in under 18 months the newest one was 7 months old.

Clint
 

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Could be weak batteries, could be excessive resistance in the cables, bad clutch switch, or even a bad starter. There could also be excessive parasitic draw on the battery (more than 50 milliamps is considered "excessive") that is running the battery down overnight. It would be a good idea to take a voltmeter and measure the battery voltage first thing in the morning to see if it is low. It would also be a good idea to see what the voltage drop is while attempting to start the vehicle.
Batteries these days aren't nearly as good as they were about 10-15 years ago. I remember Nissan batteries were delivered dry to the dealer and we had to install the battery acid at the dealer and then slow charge them before we sold them. This isn't the case anymore. It seems you could get 5-6 years out of a battery back in the day. Now, three years seems to be average. Most of the batteries are made by only a couple of companies, anyway, namely Johnson Controls and Exide.
 

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1st off, 35 isn't "cold"

secondly, charging a rarely used battery for one hour isn't giving it a full charge. Then using it to start an engine probably ran it right back down.

third, how old is the battery in your truck?

Have your battery tested and go from there.
Beat me to it!
 
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