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2015 Nissan Frontier SV Crew Cab LWB 4x4
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So a lot of manufacturers lately have been using special processes when forming the frames for their trucks. Many of these processes result in stronger frames but as a side-effect one isn't supposed to weld or drill on them.

Normally these features are touted in advertisements for the trucks, but they don't really advertise the Frontier much anymore and I wasn't really paying attention in the mid-noughties when these trucks first came out, so I'm not sure if Nissan has done anything with high-strength steel, or heat-treated steel, etc.

Is there any literature that might answer this?

I suppose what has made me think of this is the pre-drilled/tapped bosses for the trailer hitch. Most trucks I've worked on in the past just call for the hitch holes to be drilled in the frame, but they've obviously sought to compel us to use their holes, and since that costs money to add those bosses there must be at least some kind of reason.
 

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Registered
2015 Nissan Frontier SV Crew Cab LWB 4x4
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1,975 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Hmm. I'm kind of thinking no...

  • Body-on-frame construction
    Benefits: Safety/Security, Performance, Comfort/Convenience, Durability​


    Rugged strength of body-on-frame construction carries all mechanical components securely and provides a strong backbone for hauling and towing.​
  • Frame includes integrated front and rear crumple zones.
    S S S S​
  • Welded ladder frame

    Steel-reinforced frame has crossmembers that are welded (not riveted) to the frame rails to reduce frame flexing and increase durability. Robotic welding ensures precise, consistent welds.​

  • Full-length box section rails

    Frame rails are box-sectioned (enclosed on all four sides) for their full length to provide added strength for heavy-duty use. Full-length box section rails also help reduce noise, vibration, and harshness.​

  • Post-weld piercing

    To help ensure accurate fit of the body assembly and precise location of suspension components, body and suspension locating points on the frame are hydraulically pierced after welding is completed.​
Has anyone done any intentional bending on their frame, either to modify something for a specific purpose or to do post-accident repair?
 
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