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Discussion Starter #1
I'm looking to replace my current alternator with one at least or better than 220A.
What have you guys used for high amperage alts?

I need at least 160A at idle and 220A at around 1200-1600RPM.
I've seen some at 220A-250A going for about $238

If I can get a good alt then I will look into adding a second of the same.
Ideally I am looking to be able to get ~300A idle and ~340A at around 1200-1600RPM.
I need at least 2880W continuous / NEC de-rated.

A portable generator will not work for my purposes.
 

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Assuming your alternator is set to regulate at around 13.8 volts, 2880 watts would be around 210 amps.
 
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Discussion Starter #3
That would be Peak power. I need "continuous" / NEC de-rated power. So if 13.8VDC is the set value then I need 3600W or 260A for a continuous 2880W.

At this continuous load it may run for 2hrs or more.

Numbers aside, what high output alts do you guys use?
 

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I've been considering QualityPower 250A (around $400.) and Mean Green 200A (around $350).

But looking at the location on our trucks, I'm reluctant to pay that kind of money to
have it sitting in water on a regular basis.

I'm looking to see what will be involved in relocating it to a better spot.

Have you looked to see if a shop can rewire the stock to increase output?
 

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Discussion Starter #5
yeah the location is kind of a crappy place to put an alternator......lol

I haven't checked on a shop to rewire because the alt is a pretty compact package and such a small package will have issues dissipating heat at the rate it will be run/used.
I figured an alt designed for the load would be better.

As for a second alt, i'm not sure anyone has done it on a 2005 Front. Or at least I haven't seen pics. If there are pics please post. :)
 

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Good luck, the heat output for a continuous 160 amp output at idle for 2 hrs will need a serious heat sink in addition to increased cooling capacity, also the draw on your engine in general for that kind of output is kinda ridiculous. Many years back I had a WPP alternator (Wrangler Power Products) on a Mazda B2200 pickup. The alternator I ran was rated 250 amps max, 120 continuous, at idle I couldn't keep enough airflow going over it and fried it twice. At the time, I volunteered for a Search and Rescue and ambulance service. This was pre-led days, not uncommon to sometimes sit at an accident scene with the flashers, headlights and maybe a aux. off-road lights all on fro an hour. The other thing to consider, at idle, your truck idles at 800 rpms warm, that alternator is going to want 1,200 rpms continuous idle for that output.
 

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I can't remember where I got it, but back when I was working as a construction equipment
contract mechanic, I'd had an alternator installed on my truck that also worked as a
A/C stick welder. If I remember right I got it from an Austrailian company. It could
provide A/C or D/C power and came with a solenoid that could kick up the idle speed to a
preset position based on power draw.

I can't remember where I got it... but clearly the technology is there since that was
in the 90's.
 

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Good luck, the heat output for a continuous 160 amp output at idle for 2 hrs will need a serious heat sink
A few decades ago, it wasn't uncommon to find "high output" aftermarket alternators that had the rectifier diodes re-located to a big, external heat sink that you could mount in any cool location. It's a good idea, but seems to have fallen out of favor.

also the draw on your engine in general for that kind of output is kinda ridiculous.
If the alternator was 100 percent efficient, producing 3600 watts of electricity would require around 4.8 engine horsepower.

In the real world, you might get 30 percent efficiency out of the alternator - which would still only require around 16 engine HP.
 

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I can't remember where I got it, but back when I was working as a construction equipment
contract mechanic, I'd had an alternator installed on my truck that also worked as a
A/C stick welder. If I remember right I got it from an Austrailian company. It could
provide A/C or D/C power and came with a solenoid that could kick up the idle speed to a
preset position based on power draw.

I can't remember where I got it... but clearly the technology is there since that was
in the 90's.
Wrangler Power Products and another company introduced these in the late 80's, they got their start down under and then a US company ran with it here. The 4wd mags all ran articles on it, great technology, they are still around, but pricey.

A few decades ago, it wasn't uncommon to find "high output" aftermarket alternators that had the rectifier diodes re-located to a big, external heat sink that you could mount in any cool location. It's a good idea, but seems to have fallen out of favor.



If the alternator was 100 percent efficient, producing 3600 watts of electricity would require around 4.8 engine horsepower.

In the real world, you might get 30 percent efficiency out of the alternator - which would still only require around 16 engine HP.
That external heat sink still generated a S* ton of heat, mine was mounted on the fire wall, and you didn't want to touch it.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
I'm going to abandon the second alt. Not enough space for it
I'm just going to drop in a moderate 210-240A alt.
 

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I was thinking the same or just take a tow strap.
 
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